Food Talk

My arrival in September was not my first time in India. I had the opportunity to join Dr. Annie Dandavati of the Political Science Department and fellow Hope student Tristan Tobias (‘19)  at the Global Liberal Arts Alliance (GLAA) Conference in Pune this summer for a week. I knew the traffic, busyness, and smells enough not to be shocked but India has still found ways to continuously surprise me. When I got off the plane and walked out into a dark and busy New Delhi, my system still did a back flip. Everything is entirely different right down to the pigeons and crows. New languages, car horns, and ways of culture seemed to grasp every inch of my attention until it was left over extended. I cried that first night in New Delhi not because I was sad to be there, but just because this seemed to be the only reaction that could summarize my spinning thoughts. However, in the midst of the crazy, I have found a new relationship that has helped me ground me when I needed it most.

I know a lot of people, myself included, have a very complicated relationship with food. I have spent much of my younger energy on criticizing what and how much I was eating. Although my mindset has come a long way, I would say up until arriving here, I still had a hard time appreciating my relationship with food. I never really acknowledged the partnership that it was. However, something about watching my host mom wake before the sun rises to start cooking for the day, tasting the violent spice of Rajasthani food as the desert sun beats down on my face, and actively participating in a society that values the ability to eat fully has greatly changed my outlook. At the end of the day, being able to sit with a family and appreciate a home-cooked meal has been my center as the world spun.

Growing up, my family would pray before meals, making a point to be grateful for the fact that we had food on our table and recognizing that many people do not. Although I still hold this practice and mindset, I think true appreciation for food goes much deeper. It’s not just seeing and recognizing those without food, but seeing and recognizing all the people and efforts that went into the food. When I lift a bite of a South Indian Dosa to my mouth, I think about the farmers, truckers, factory workers, and cooks that went into the spicy potato and vegetable stuffed lentil crepe. I think of the many steps that went into the exact taste in my mouth. In eating in this way, I am able to see the oil sizzling garlic and onion, the potatoes being roasted and coated in turmeric, mustard seeds being poured over everything, a pinch of cardamom powder bringing all the flavors together, and the final intricate flip of the ballooned Dosa.

A big philosophy in my life is “invite more people to the table.” I think this is what my faith calls me to do and what the world often needs. We don’t need to agree or hold hands all the time, but if we could just sit and share a meal, the world could be a much better place. However, I never really realized the importance of actually inviting food to the table. Each day brings new challenges and learning opportunities, but I now encounter these ups and downs with dedicated time to sit and share a meal with those around me.

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