Hope Again Receives Stars Silver Rating for Sustainability Achievements

Hope College has again earned a STARS Silver rating in recognition of its sustainability achievements from the Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education (AASHE).

STARS, the Sustainability Tracking, Assessment & Rating System, measures and encourages sustainability in all aspects of higher education.  Hope has held a silver rating since 2017, after previously holding a Bronze rating beginning in 2012.

Read the full press release announcement by following this link.

The ratings are at four different levels:  Bronze at 25 points, Silver at 45 points, Gold at 65 points and Platinum at 85 points.  Hope’s overall score is 57.65 points, an increase from the college’s 2017 score of 48.64.  The college’s report is publicly available on the STARS website at stars.aashe.org.
Learn more about campus sustainability at: hope.edu/sustainability

Living Sustainably: Combat groundwater challenges by watering wisely

By Rich C. Lakeberg, Ottawa County
Water – it’s one of the building blocks of life, and Michiganders are surrounded by it. With more than 3,000 miles of Great Lakes shoreline, one may assume Michigan could never face a water shortage.
But Ottawa County is facing such a challenge. To understand why, we need to look underground.
In Ottawa County, and in much of Michigan, municipal water drawn from the Great Lakes is only available to those near a city. In rural areas, drinking water is sourced from aquifers — pockets of saturated soil 50 to 350 feet below ground that are not connected to Lake Michigan.
Locally, there are two types of aquifers: glacial and bedrock. Glacial aquifers are the preferred well source; but when glacial sources aren’t available, bedrock aquifers are tapped. Normally, aquifers are replenished with rainwater. However, in many areas of Ottawa County, clay deposits block rainwater from reaching the bedrock aquifer.
“Based on seven years of scientific study, we’ve learned drinking water in the bedrock aquifer isn’t being replenished as quickly as it’s being removed,” said Paul Sachs, director of the Ottawa County Planning and Performance Improvement Department. In some instances, wells have run dry; in others,briny sediment has been pulled from the bottom, damaging plumbing and affecting water quality. To protect our groundwater from further decline, we need the community’s help to reduce outdoor water use.
As the weather warms, our attention turns to our yards. EPA data shows, on average, 30 percent of Americans’ daily water consumption is outdoors. By changing our landscaping habits, we can save H20.

Consider these tips to protect local water resources:
Smart irrigation – You may have a sprinkler system on a timer that runs rain or shine. By installing smart devices like rain sensors or a weather-based irrigation controller, thousands of gallons can be saved per year.
Rain barrels – Catch rain runoff to water your landscaping. The barrel can be connected directly to an irrigation system, or soaker hoses can be attached.
Consider replacing your grass lawn – Slow-growing groundcovers such as buffalo grass or clover can provide a green space that needs less water and mowing.
Shrink your lawn – Traditionally, turf grass covers the majority of a yard. Consider planting turf only where it’s needed. Low-traffic areas can be converted to gardens or buffers.
Plant native gardens – Consider replacing exotic plants ill-suited to our climate with natives that need little water, enrich the soil, and provide habitat.

By taking a few steps to reduce water use in our yards today, we can join in on the effort to ensure Ottawa County residents and stakeholders have permanent, sustainable access to clean water. For more information on Ottawa County’s groundwater challenges and what’s being done to address them, visit miottawa.org/groundwater.

 Rich C. Lakeberg is a communications specialist for the Ottawa County Planning and Performance Improvement Department, which uses tax dollars to deliver county programs and services for residents, visitors, and businesses through thorough planning and thoughtful evaluation.

ABOUT THIS SERIES  
Living Sustainably is a collection of community voices sharing updates about local sustainability initiatives. It is presented by the Holland-Hope College Sustainability Institute, a joint project of Hope College, the City of Holland and Holland Board of Public Works. Go to www.hope.edu/sustainability-institute for more information.

This Week’s Sustainability Framework Theme
Environmental Awareness/Action: Environmental education and integrating environmental practices into our planning will change negative outcomes of the past and improve our future.

Groundcovers such as buffalo grass do not need the heavy irrigation of traditional lawns, thus saving groundwater resources.
This landscape design incorporates native wildflowers and grasses that need less water, and features turfgrass only where it’s necessary. Photo courtesy USA.gov.
Buffalo grass is a native warm-season grass that is drought-tolerant and only grows to 4-5 inches in height. Photo courtesy USA.gov

Living Sustainably: Holland Farmers Market opens with new safety regulations

By Lisa Uganski, Ottawa County Department of Public Health
It’s that time of year when many people look forward to shopping outdoors at farm markets. The Holland Farmers Market is now open to provide the community with fresh, local and healthy food in a safe outdoor environment.
Due COVID-19 concerns, the market has implemented a number of safety regulations for vendors and customers. If planning to shop at the market, customers should be aware that:
The market will be open 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. every Wednesday and Saturday. However, the hour from 8 to 9 a.m. will be strictly reserved for those who are immunocompromised, aged 60-plus, and pregnant women.

 The perimeter of the Eighth Street Market Place will be fenced and there will be three entrances and exits for customers. Vendors will be located outside only and access to the Holland Civic Center will be limited to the restrooms only. Market staff will count the number of shoppers coming in and out so they can ensure that everyone can maintain adequate social distancing. Please expect to wait in line and maintain at least 6 feet of distance between you and others while doing so.
 Please avoid shopping at the market if you, someone you live with, or someone you’re caring for has been ill within the last 14 days. (Excluding health care workers.)
 Customers are highly advised to wear masks while they shop.
 Please be mindful to maintain at least 6 feet of distance between you and other customers at all times to keep yourself and your fellow customers safe and healthy.
 Please shop as quickly and efficiently as possible. It’s recommended that you to shop alone, without children and with as few family members as possible.
 Shoppers are encouraged to wash or sanitize their hands before entering the Eighth Street Market Place and again when leaving.
 Customers are advised to wash all produce and wipe down all food packages prior to eating and storing products at home.
 Food is not allowed to be consumed onsite at the market.
 Dogs are still prohibited at the Holland Farmers Market.
 Bridge Cards (SNAP or EBT), Pandemic EBT, Double Up Food Bucks, WIC Project Fresh, Senior Project Fresh and Market Bucks are all accepted as payment, in addition to cash. There is currently no limit on how much you may “double up” if using your Bridge Card or Pandemic EBT card. Some vendors also accept credit cards.
 A number of vendors allow customers to pre-order products in advance via phone, website or email with product pick-up at the market. Customers are highly encouraged to explore this option with individual vendors. For more information, visit www.hollandfarmersmarket.com or call (616)355-1138.

 Lisa Uganski is a registered dietitian and has been working at the Ottawa County epartment of Public Health for 19 years. Lisa has a passion for making healthy food available and accessible to everyone. She is the coordinator of Ottawa Food, a collaboration of local agencies and individuals that exists to ensure that all Ottawa County residents have access to healthy, local, and affordable food choices.

This Week’s Sustainability Framework Theme
Community & Neighborhood: The places we live and the individuals we interact with support the development of our personalities and perspectives on life. Encouraging vital and effective communities is essential.

ABOUT THIS SERIES  
Living Sustainably is a collection of community voices sharing updates about local sustainability initiatives. It is presented by the Holland-Hope College Sustainability Institute, a joint project of Hope College, the City of Holland and Holland Board of Public Works. Go to www.hope.edu/sustainability-institute for more information.

Safe practices at the Holland Farmers Market include limiting access points to control the size of the crowd. Photo courtesy City of Holland.
The Holland Famers Market is open with safe practices in place, including limiting the numbers of shoppers and encouraging wearing of masks. Photo courtesy City of Holland.
Healthy eating, like fresh in-season asparagus, is matched up with healthy social distancing practices at the Holland Farm Market. Photo courtesy Holland Farmers Market.

Living Sustainably: Economic restart must meet child care needs

By Donna Lowry, Ready for School
A healthy and economically vibrant community depends on meeting the real-time needs of families.
Early learning and child care professionals know this well. They partner with working parents and caregivers to provide children the early learning experiences they need for a strong start in kindergarten and life.

Prior to COVID-19, access to quality child care was limited because the demand exceeded capacity.
Locally, there are only nine child care centers that offer infant care. On average, families encounter an 18-month waitlist for quality infant and toddler care.
When COVID-19 hit, the business of child care took a hit, more severe than in the 2008 recession.
Unlike a decade ago, our community has the early childhood network in place to support the people who are in the business of child care. But there is more to be done.
Helping early learning organizations sustain their businesses is an essential part of beginning to safely reopen the economy. With over 65 percent of Ottawa County families having both parents in the workforce, quality child care is an investment in community infrastructure to support family-centered progress.
To help address this, our community’s public-private early childhood network is paying attention to the business needs in child care – for business owners, working parents, and children.
“High-quality child care settings do more than care for children; they educate, teach social-emotional skills, and foster brain development during the most critical time of child development,” said Tami Mannes, director of early childhood services at the Ottawa Area Intermediate School District.
Both State of Michigan and federal financial relief have been made available. On March 18, the State of Michigan expanded capacity for disaster relief child care services.  The intention of this order was to expand child care capacity for the essential workforce. The Ottawa Area Intermediate School District, in cooperation with state and local partners, is working to support the Executive Order (2020-16)
through Help Me Grow-Ottawa, to support essential workers’ efforts to find child care during this time.
Last week, The Child Care Relief Fund was announced. The program goal is to help child care business owners stay in business and make quality child care more affordable for Michigan families. The application is simple and only takes 10 minutes. Child care providers can apply at www.michigan.gov/childcare.
Leading – especially in times of crisis – means seeing beyond the immediate future to anticipate the next three, four, or five obstacles. To this end, the community is collaborating to understand emerging needs, strengthen the child-care sector, and improve families’ access to high-quality early learning programs.
Communities grow and strengthen with shared care and resilience. Now more than ever it is important for small children to dream BIG. This is essential for the health and economic vibrancy of our community.
 Donna Lowry, MD, is president/CEO of Ready for School. She joined the organization after being a volunteer physician member of the medical task force. Her leadership role involves collaborative team building to ensure that there is a trusted community conduit for system access for all families with young children.

Questions about the Child Care Relief Fund in Michigan?
Contact: The Great Start to Quality Western Regional Resource Center at (877)614-7328 or Child Development and Care Department at (866)990-3227. If you have something to share, contact Ready for School, info@readyforschool.org

This Week’s Sustainability Framework Theme
Community Knowledge: The collective knowledge and energy of the community is an incredible resource that must be channeled to where it is needed.

ABOUT THIS SERIES  
Living Sustainably is a collection of community voices sharing updates about local sustainability initiatives. It is presented by the Holland-Hope College Sustainability Institute, a joint project of Hope College, the City of Holland and Holland Board of Public Works. Go to www.hope.edu/sustainability-institute for more information.

Now more than ever it is essential for the health and economic vibrancy of our community for small children to dream big.
With over 65 percent of Ottawa County families having both parents in the workforce, quality child care is an investment in community infrastructure to support family-centered progress.
High-quality child care settings educate, teach social-emotional skills, and foster brain development during the most critical time of child development.

Living Sustainably: Parents can teach street safety to kids

By Kerry Irons, Pedal Holland
As the weather gets nicer, it’s easier to get children outside for biking and walking while following facemask and social distance guidelines. But other safety measures should be taken too – even after the COVID-19 crisis passes.
Parents and caregivers can help children learn safe skills and behaviors by providing repeated instruction and modeling.
Children who are 4 to 6 years old are entering a time when their physical and mental abilities allow basic walking and sidewalk bicycling safety skills to be introduced, discussed, and practiced.
Children 7 to 9 years old can continue expanding their pedestrian and bicycling abilities and knowledge through more education and practice with adult supervision.
But remember, 7 to 9 year olds are developing and gaining skills at varying rates. There are skills that some 7 year olds can master that present a challenge to some 9 year olds. Adults need to recognize this range of abilities and tailor the teaching and experiences appropriately.
Children age 10 and older continue to develop their physical, cognitive and psychosocial abilities.
With proper training and experience, ages 10 to 12 is when children can begin to safely ride bicycles in the street.
Parents can teach and reinforce judgment skills by walking and bicycling with their children and modeling safe behavior. Young children need to walk with an adult to practice safe street crossing behavior. Parents should wear bike helmets, because if children see it is OK for mom and dad to not wear one, they won’t wear one either when they are out of their parent’s sight.
Attention-switching and concentration are cognitive skills that children are developing throughout childhood, so they often need extra help focusing on the important information in a crossing situation.
Children need help from adults to repeat many times the process of “stop, wait, listen and look” while crossing the street before they can complete it safely by themselves. Also, asking “Can you see a car?” is more effective than “Look both ways.” The latter can become a ritual behavior rather than an action to spot traffic.
Parents can “narrate” their good behaviors, telling their children how they are looking for cars, preparing to stop, watching the driver’s face, estimating vehicle speed, etc. Parents can do this while driving as well, imparting traffic awareness and the logic process used to safely navigate traffic.
The ultimate goal of a parent’s time spent discussing and modeling safe walking and cycling with children – and giving them opportunities to practice – is to help children become safe, confident and independent pedestrians and bicyclists.
Those children will be able to recognize and pick the best places to walk, ride, cross, and behave as safely as possible near traffic. They will also grow up to become better drivers because they understand how to share the road with people on foot and bicycle.

  Kerry Irons is a retired chemical engineer who has lived in Holland for five years.  Irons is a lifelong cyclist who is a member of Pedal Holland, which advocates for bicycle safety in Holland.

Children and traffic: A dangerous mix Understand children’s limitations in dealing with traffic. Remember that children:
 Have about a one-third narrower field of vision than adults.
 Cannot easily judge a car’s speed and distance.
 Assume that if they can see a car, its driver must be able to see them.
 Cannot readily tell the direction a sound is coming from.
 May be impatient and impulsive.
 Concentrate on only one thing at a time; this is likely not to be traffic.
 Have a limited sense of danger.
 Often mix fantasy with reality.
 Imitate the (often bad) behavior of others, especially older children and adults.
Given children’s limitations, drivers should:
 Be especially cautious where children walk, ride or play.
 Reduce speeds around children.
 Stop completely at stop bars and crosswalks.
 Be prepared to stop suddenly.

The Safe Routes to School (SR2S) program has a great guide on children’s bike and pedestrian safety at http://guide.saferoutesinfo.org/pdf/SRTS-Guide_Education.pdf

This Week’s Sustainability Framework Theme
Transportation: The movement of people, goods, and services within the area is an evolving system that links us to our regional, national and global networks.

ABOUT THIS SERIES  
Living Sustainably is a collection of community voices sharing updates about local sustainability initiatives. It is presented by the Holland-Hope College Sustainability Institute, a joint project of Hope College, the City of Holland and Holland Board of Public Works. Go to www.hope.edu/sustainability-institute for more information.

Parents can teach and reinforce judgment skills by walking and bicycling with their children and modeling safe behavior.
The ultimate goal of a parent’s time spent discussing and modeling safe cycling with children – and giving them opportunities to practice – is to help children become safe, confident and independent bicyclists. Parents need to remember young children have significant limitations in dealing with traffic situations.

Living Sustainably: A Sustainable Look at Lawn Care

By Chris Grant, Citizens Climate Lobby
One day while I was raking leaves, it occurred to me to investigate the decibel level of the leaf blowers in use all around me, with the thought that I might need ear protection while using my rake. A Google search turned up information regarding noise, and also some surprising facts about leaf lower emissions.
Many gas-powered blowers have two-stroke (also called two-cycle) engines that burn a mix of gas and oil. Because combustion is incomplete, the engines add to air pollution by emitting hydrocarbons, nitrogen oxides and carbon monoxide. In fact, a comprehensive study by Edmunds Automotive comparing emissions of cars, pickup trucks and leaf blowers found that two-cycle blowers emitted 299 times the hydrocarbons and 23 times the carbon monoxide as the pickup truck!
One possible explanation for this astonishing result is that, unlike two-cycle engines, diesel and gasoline vehicle engines are highly regulated and much cleaner than decades ago. In other words, two-cycle technology is obsolete, though it’s also used in most string trimmers and chainsaws.
As for noise, typical gas-powered leaf blowers produce 80 to 85 decibels, which can be harmful to hearing, and some less-expensive models may produce up to 112 decibels, with hearing loss possible in less than five minutes. Decibels are calculated in such a way that the relationship between levels is not linear; 120 decibels is 32 times as loud as 70.
And noise diminishes slowly with distance. At least seven jurisdictions in Michigan are attempting to regulate gas-powered leaf blowers by restricting decibel level and/or hours and days of operation.
Alternatives to two-cycle engines include four-cycle models with lower emissions and corded or cordless (battery-powered) electric versions. The use of electric equipment shifts production of greenhouse gases to power plants outfitted with scrubbers that remove pollutants. In Holland, Hope College is currently transitioning away from gasoline engines for some of its landscaping equipment.
Also in Holland, the community organization 3sixty has developed a comprehensive tool-sharing system called the Tool Library. (Although the Tool Library is temporarily closed due to coronavirus concerns, it will reopen at an appropriate time with safety measures in place. Updates will be posted on the neighborhood’s website at www.3-sixty.org.)
Featuring power and non-power tools, most of the library’s blowers, trimmers and mowers are electric. Electric equipment initially can be more expensive than gas-powered choices, a drawback addressed by the borrowing program.
The neighborhood’s website, www.3-sixty.org, includes a short video about the library along with contact, appointment and membership information. It’s also possible to borrow tools for a fee without becoming a member. Use of the Tool Library is open to anyone over 18 years old in the city’s core neighborhoods – Eighth to 24th streets between Ottawa and Fairbanks/Lincoln Avenues.
This cooperative program is a fine example of how to promote sustainability on a local level, an example other neighborhoods and communities might want to explore.
 Chris Grant is a City of Holland resident and is interested in helping our community better understand our choices for reducing our carbon footprint. Chris is a member of the Citizens Climate Lobby.

This Week’s Sustainability Framework Theme
Environmental Awareness/Action: Environmental education and integrating environmental practices into our planning will change negative outcomes of the past and improve our future.

ABOUT THIS SERIES  
Living Sustainably is a collection of community voices sharing updates about local sustainability initiatives. It is presented by the Holland-Hope College Sustainability Institute, a joint project of Hope College, the City of Holland and Holland Board of Public Works. Go to www.hope.edu/sustainability-institute for more information.

The 3sixty Neighborhood Tool Library is an example of a cost-effective, sustainable way for a neighborhood to provide quality, low-polluting electric lawn tools for residents.
Electric leaf blowers avoid the ear-splitting noise and the extremely high levels of pollution produced by two-cycle engine-powered blowers.

Living Sustainably: Local campaign asks, “If you don’t need it yourself, #ShareTheStimulus”

By Patrick Cisler, Lakeshore Nonprofit Alliance
Stimulus checks from the federal government started to arrive in the bank accounts or mailboxes of Ottawa County residents over the past week. These funds are vital for those who are currently unemployed or underemployed, struggling with food security, or facing unexpected financial challenges due to the COVID-19 pandemic.
The majority of American households will need their stimulus funds to cover basic expenses over the next couple of months. While we know the full impact of the COVID-19 pandemic hasn’t yet been revealed, we’ve already seen initial implications for our economy. The nonprofit sector has seen and felt the impact, too, with requests for services like food assistance rapidly increasing.
What about those households who are in a stable financial position, but receive a stimulus check which they may not need? To those people, we humbly ask you to consider sharing the stimulus.
A coalition of nonprofit and government leaders here in Ottawa County believe that small, intentional acts of investment in our local community can help us all emerge stronger from the other side of this. That’s why we’ve created the #ShareTheStimulus campaign.
Sharing the stimulus can take any number of forms. For some, it’s ordering carry-out from your favorite local restaurants and leaving generous tips for the servers. You can purchase goods or gift cards online from a small business. Perhaps you’ve noticed people in your circle of influence who are struggling and want to give directly to them.
Another option is to make a financial gift directly to a nonprofit of your choice, or a contribution to the Emergency Human Needs Funds set-up by The Community Foundation of the Holland/Zeeland Area, The Grand Haven Community Foundation, and Greater Ottawa County United Way. Donations to the Emergency Human Needs Funds are distributed in real-time to support the incredible agencies who are keeping people fed, housed, and healthy during this pandemic.
To date, over $534,000 has been distributed from the Emergency Human Needs Fund. Generous contributions from our community, along with seed money from the three founding agencies, made this impact possible. Grants are helping Community Action House pack food boxes that support two people for a week. They are helping Mosaic Counseling continue to offer mental health services to their clients by adapting to remote sessions. They are helping Children’s Advocacy Center remain available to children and their families affected by abuse. A full list of agencies receiving grants is available at careottawacounty.com.
Sharing the stimulus, whether you choose to order food, buy a gift card, help a neighbor, or support the mission of a nonprofit, ensures our community can bounce back from these challenging times. The need is great, and the time is now. Please join us if you can and #ShareTheStimulus.

 Patrick Cisler is executive director of the Lakeshore Nonprofit Alliance, an organization which works to strengthen the ability of more than 150 member nonprofit organizations to successfully accomplish their missions by working together.

Programs like food distribution at The Bridge in Zeeland can benefit from #SharingtheStimulus by those who have enough resources are better off.
Sustaining our business and nonprofit communities through small, intentional acts of investment can help us emerge stronger from the pandemic.
“Share the Stimulus” asks that people who have enough resources to consider the needs of businesses, nonprofits or individuals that are hard hit by the shutdown.

Earth Day Bingo!

In celebration of the 50th Annual Earth Day (April 22), Michigan universities and colleges are excited to collaborate to present Earth Week Bingo as a call to action.  Please join us in completing various Earth-themed activities (this week and every other day) to honor our beautiful community and take care of our Earth.  While still heeding social distancing guidelines, choose activities and post photos of the activities that you complete all week! Try to complete a full line of the bingo board, or even fill out the whole thing.  Every time you post a photo, show your collegiate spirit and tag your school (or alma mater!), use their hashtag, and #miearthday!

Tag us at-

Twitter: HC_Green Instagram: HollandHopeSustainability Facebook: Hope Advocates for Sustainability

Earth Day 2020 Bingo pdf

Living Sustainably: Earth Day turns 50!! April 22

By Dr. Steven Bouma-Prediger, Religion Department, Hope College
April 22, 1970. I remember it well. The very first Earth Day. It was a special day in my junior high school. We watched some of the national events – in Washington D.C. and New York City – on a television. We went outside and planted some flowers. We discussed some of the local environmental issues of that day – water pollution, air pollution, species extinction.
The brainchild of Wisconsin senator Gaylord Nelson, Earth Day was designed to promote care for the environment and place such care permanently on the national political agenda. But neither Nelson nor any of the other organizers knew how influential an event Earth Day would turn out to be.

More than 20 million people participated – nearly one in 10 Americans at that time. Imagine a gathering today of 10 percent of our present population – 33 million Americans. That is over three times the population of the entire state of Michigan.
Fifty years later that very first Earth Day ranks as not only one of the largest gatherings in American history, but also one of the most influential. Many mark that first Earth Day as the real beginning of the environmental movement.
The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration was founded on Oct. 3, 1970. Congress passed the Clean Air Act with only one dissenting vote and it was signed into law by President Richard Nixon on Dec. 31, 1970. The Clean Water Act was signed into law in 1972. The Endangered Species Act was passed in 1973. The Toxic Substances Control Act in 1976. The list goes on.
In short, that first Earth Day fundamentally altered for the better the political, economic, and cultural (not to mention the physical or ecological) landscape of our country.
So, what about Earth Day 2020? What will we do on this Earth Day to make the world a better place? What will we do in the weeks and months and years ahead that will cause those on Earth Day 2070 to say that our home planet is more habitable and hospitable because of what earthkeepers did in 2020?
(For more on this, see the Earth Day 50th anniversary special issue of National Geographic, presenting two contrasting possible futures: “How We Lost the Planet/How We Saved the World).

We live in a time when, in the face of large and seemingly intractable ecological problems, many say there is nothing one person can do to make a difference. We feel helpless. But we must resist the urge to think we are helpless. Just like those on Earth Day 1970, we must be people of hope who imagine and believe possible a good future of earthly flourishing, and then do what is needed to make it real.
Robin Wall Kimmerer, a college professor and writer, tells the story of one of her students who responded to her apology that the environmental activism of her (baby boomer) generation should have solved more of the problems we currently face. Her student replied: “When everything hangs in the balance, it matters where I stand. How wonderful to live in a time when everything that I do matters.”
Everything that we do matters. So, let’s celebrate the 50th anniversary of Earth Day by doing what we can to make our home planet more livable for those (human and non-human) around us.
 A college professor for 30 years, Dr. Steven Bouma-Prediger loves nothing better than teaching students outside.

This Week’s Sustainability Framework Theme
Environmental Awareness/Action: Environmental education and integrating environmental practices into our planning will change negative outcomes of the past and improve our future.

ABOUT THIS SERIES  
Living Sustainably is a collection of community voices sharing updates about local sustainability initiatives. It is presented by the Holland-Hope College Sustainability Institute, a joint project of Hope College, the City of Holland and Holland Board of Public Works. Go to www.hope.edu/sustainability-institute for more information.

The beauty of Earth, celebrated on Earth Day, is seen just above the horizon of the moon in this image from NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter.
Work begun in the wake of Earth Day 50 years ago continues with cleanups that have made Lake Macatawa an attractive recreational and financial resource.