Preparing for Final Exams

Overwhelmed by finals? College Info Geek has gathered resources that may be helpful as you prepare for the end of the semester. The Ultimate Guide for Studying for Final Exams includes links with useful tips and tricks on everything from breaking through a lack of motivation for studying to maintaining focus and concentration to test-taking strategies for the day of the exam. Check it out and good luck!

Making Accommodations

Often “accommodation” is defined as something that is supplied for convenience or an act that is done to a person, often for convenience or to reconcile differences. Just to be clear, we don’t like these definitions, but all too often this is what non-disabled individuals have thought the term “accommodation” means.

For providing accommodations in higher education, such definitions do not ensure confidence in disability services staff. When we shift our lens to focus on accessibility, however, we view accommodations very differently. They are no longer about convenience but about equal access necessary for learning, attending events, and participating in programs on Hope’s campus.

Paul D. Grossman wrote an article in 2001 about accommodations in higher education titled “Making Accommodations: The Legal World of Students with Disabilities.” I encourage you to click on the link to read the article, but if you don’t have the time, the below summarizes some of the article’s highlights:

MYTH 1: Disability law is not a civil rights law. Thoughts on this may be impacted by the model of disability that informs your view, but we believe disability laws are civil rights laws. To quote directly from the article, “Those who see the connection between disability law and federal civil rights laws will find the path to understanding disability law a great deal easier to follow. We desegregate our schools to remove the stigma that comes from enforced separation and to bring all students the advantages of diversity in the classroom. ‘Academic adjustments and reasonable modifications’ and the provision of ‘auxiliary aids and services’ are important tools for desegregating institutions and extending equal educational opportunity to the disability community. These devices, commonly called ‘reasonable accommodations,’ have had a considerable impact on who participates in higher education.”

MYTH 2: Academic accommodations force faculty to lower academic standards, but in actuality, academic accommodations for courses do not change what but how students learn. For example, a student who is deaf or hard of hearing may capture lecture content by using an assistive listening device, real-time captioning, or an ASL interpreter. Students who are blind or visually impaired may use text converted to Braille, a screen reader, or a magnifier/reader. Students approved for note-taking assistance (for a variety of disability-related reasons) may use technology to take pictures of the whiteboard, to type notes, or record lectures.

MYTH 3: Academic accommodations create unfair advantages for students, but again, directly from the article: “In my experience, modifications to examinations, particularly extra time to complete them, rank first in triggering faculty concerns about treating all students fairly. The objective of providing individuals extra time on examinations is to measure what students have learned rather than the impact of their disability. When a student’s performance speed is a skill a professor intends to measure, extra time on an examination would not be an appropriate accommodation.” Still not convinced? Try out this demonstration on the Stroop Effect.

Faculty Rights and Responsibilities

We are updating the Disability Services website and have added information for faculty regarding rights and responsibilities when providing students with accommodations. You can read the entire list on the website or review a few key points below.

More updates are coming soon. Please continue to check the website for answers to your questions, or feel free to contact Disability Services.

Faculty responsibilities

  1. Trust the expertise of Disability Services staff, and provide students with accommodations as outlined. If you have a concern about an approved accommodation, contact Disability Services to discuss it.
  2. Maintain confidentiality.

Faculty rights

  1. To request academic-accommodation verification of a student’s eligibility for any requested accommodations. Disability Services is the only office designated to review disability documentation and determine eligibility for appropriate accommodations. Please refer students to Disability Services if they are seeking accommodations without proper documentation.
  2. To administer an accommodation as it is stated by Disability Services. If students believe accommodations are not meeting disability-related needs, refer them back to Disability Services.
  3. To expect the same conduct standards for each student in your course.

Disability Services Contact Information
Disability Services website
616-395-7830
ds@hope.edu

Jeanne Lindell – Head of Disability Services

Carrie Dattels – Coordinator of Disability Services

Megan Herzog – Services Assistant

Do I really need to caption my videos?

Making sure videos have captions can be confusing and time consuming for those not familiar with available options. Disability Services (DS) can assist you. If you receive notice that a student in your course needs accommodations that include captions, contact us.

How does providing captions allow access to course materials?

  • The benefit of captions to students who are D/deaf may be obvious, but if you still have questions, feel free to watch this video on the A.I. blog.
  • Silence is golden. Captions are not only useful in noisy environments to increase comprehension. Forget to bring your earbuds and shouldn’t turn up the volume? No problem–turn on the captions.

 

What if videos in class only augment information from the readings or lecture rather than provide additional information for which students will be responsible? The Office of Civil Rights has defined accessible in multiple resolutions with institutions of higher education, as meaning that in any classroom or learning situation or activity:

“Accessible” means a person with a disability is afforded the opportunity to acquire the same information, engage in the same interactions, and enjoy the same services as a person without a disability in an equally effective and equally integrated manner, with substantially equivalent ease of use. A person with a disability must be able to obtain the information as fully, equally, and independently as a person without a disability. Although this might not result in identical ease of use compared to that of persons without disabilities, it still must ensure equal opportunity to the educational benefits and opportunities afforded by the technology and equal treatment in the use of such technology.” (Source: Resolution Agreement: Youngstown State University, OCR Docket No. 15-13-6002).

So now that I know I need to caption videos, what should I do? 

There are ways to manage captions regardless of the video host that is used, even if it is saved in your Google Drive.

https://support.google.com/drive/answer/1372218

Information about other platforms:

 

I still show VHS tapes in class. Can I caption videos on VHS? 

We may not have an immediate answer for this situation, but we are available to discuss how students might receive access to the information that is being shared. When updated digital technology is not available, there are still ways to provide access. Contact us. 

Midterms Are Upon Us

Mid-term exams have started, and you probably have a few for which you are preparing, or should be! Preparation, of course, is the number one key for success, but there are also some good strategies for taking multiple-choice exams. The ASC has gathered some videos we think you might find helpful. There are quite a few on YouTube, but after previewing a bunch for you, these short videos contain the best and most succinct information!
 
Remember, the ASC has many services to help you succeed. Check out everything we have to offer for FREE!

Approaching Midterms…

Needing to Improve Your Studying and Learning?

            In case you haven’t been keeping track, midterm is less than three weeks away and only two weeks after you return from Winter Break!  At this point are you feeling like you need to kick your academics into a higher gear?  If so, you’re not alone: the new-semester honeymoon is over, and February’s dreary days can sap whatever motivation you may have had.  We at the Academic Success Center (ASC) recommend two sets of strategies you can pursue: ways to help yourself and ways to get help from others.  Here are a few of the best:

Ways to Help Yourself:

 Use this checklist of “Keys to Academic Success in College” to get more organized.

† Apply these “Nine Tips for Staying Motivated in College” to overcome your doldrums.

† Practice these “Seven Steps to Becoming a Better Note Taker” to engage and learn better.

† Fill out and follow the two “Fillable Schedules” titled “Saturday – Friday, 6 a.m. – 1 a.m.” and “Semester Planning” located here.

Ways to Get Help from Others:

† Attend any department- or ASC-sponsored group helps sessions related to a class.

† Apply for an ASC tutor NOW for a class that isn’t going very well.

† Apply for a peer academic coach to help you simply “do college.”

† Set up a one-on-one ASC appointment to learn how to improve specific study strategies.

            As you know, college semesters fly by.  So don’t put off doing the very do-able things available through the Academic Success Center in VanZoeren 261.  Here’s our website where you can learn about all the various kinds of help we offer to all students, totally free of charge.

Need a Tutor?

Come to a required half hour tutoring information session before you apply.
If you attend a session, you can apply on-line, no additional appointment needed!
Applications will not be accepted until
Wednesday January 17.

Information sessions will be held on:
Mon 1/15 4:00pm
Tue 1/16 11:00am
Thur 1/18 5:00pm
Fri 1/19 3:00pm
Tue 1/23 & 1/30 11:00am
Thur 1/25 & 2/1 4:30pm
All sessions are held in VanZoeren 240.

Questions? Email us at asc@hope.edu

Tutoring Information Session Poster