ASC Study Tip- Persevere!

Persevere. College can present challenges but facing them will prepare you for challenges in your future career and life.

“Our greatest weakness lies in giving up. The most certain way to succeed is always to try just one more time.” -Thomas Edison

“Nothing is impossible, the word itself says ‘I’m possible!’ ” -Audrey Hepburn

One Week Left to get an ASC Tutor!

The last date that the ASC will accept applications for a tutor is Monday, November 19. If you would like to be matched with a tutor (for most 100 & 200 level courses) please stop by the ASC (261 VanZoeren Hall) by 5:00pm Monday, November 19. A printable application and further information can be found on the ASC website.

ASC Study Tip (week of 10/22)

Keep your study area clear of items that could distract you. Have necessary materials close at hand. Concentrate! If you suddenly think of something else you need to do, jot it down to put it out of your mind and return to it later. Turn off notifications and anything else that might disturb you.

We suggest trying the Pomodoro Technique. Check out another video about this technique and how to stop procrastinating.

The 10 Best Pomodoro Apps!

Try a Pomodoro session with the College Geek.

ASC Study Tip

Most effective studying is active, testing and questioning yourself (not passive like just re-reading notes/ textbook) and spaced throughout the week.

Think about using even short intervals of time effectively (like between classes.)
In 15 minutes you could:

· Review lecture notes and highlight the key ideas.
· Quiz yourself on the key terms in a chapter.
· Write a summary of a few paragraphs from an article/textbook.
· Read a brief article.
· List all the things you have to do later/ tomorrow.

Need more ideas? Check out how the ASC can help!

ASC Study Tip

Keep a calendar of class times, study times, tutoring sessions, and meetings with advisors or instructors and any other commitments you have. Use Google Calendar and sync it to your phone. Planning and managing your time will reduce stress and help you accomplish more. The ASC has printable calendars for your use. Stop by or visit our website!

Preparing for Final Exams

Overwhelmed by finals? College Info Geek has gathered resources that may be helpful as you prepare for the end of the semester. The Ultimate Guide for Studying for Final Exams includes links with useful tips and tricks on everything from breaking through a lack of motivation for studying to maintaining focus and concentration to test-taking strategies for the day of the exam. Check it out and good luck!

Making Accommodations

Often “accommodation” is defined as something that is supplied for convenience or an act that is done to a person, often for convenience or to reconcile differences. Just to be clear, we don’t like these definitions, but all too often this is what non-disabled individuals have thought the term “accommodation” means.

For providing accommodations in higher education, such definitions do not ensure confidence in disability services staff. When we shift our lens to focus on accessibility, however, we view accommodations very differently. They are no longer about convenience but about equal access necessary for learning, attending events, and participating in programs on Hope’s campus.

Paul D. Grossman wrote an article in 2001 about accommodations in higher education titled “Making Accommodations: The Legal World of Students with Disabilities.” I encourage you to click on the link to read the article, but if you don’t have the time, the below summarizes some of the article’s highlights:

MYTH 1: Disability law is not a civil rights law. Thoughts on this may be impacted by the model of disability that informs your view, but we believe disability laws are civil rights laws. To quote directly from the article, “Those who see the connection between disability law and federal civil rights laws will find the path to understanding disability law a great deal easier to follow. We desegregate our schools to remove the stigma that comes from enforced separation and to bring all students the advantages of diversity in the classroom. ‘Academic adjustments and reasonable modifications’ and the provision of ‘auxiliary aids and services’ are important tools for desegregating institutions and extending equal educational opportunity to the disability community. These devices, commonly called ‘reasonable accommodations,’ have had a considerable impact on who participates in higher education.”

MYTH 2: Academic accommodations force faculty to lower academic standards, but in actuality, academic accommodations for courses do not change what but how students learn. For example, a student who is deaf or hard of hearing may capture lecture content by using an assistive listening device, real-time captioning, or an ASL interpreter. Students who are blind or visually impaired may use text converted to Braille, a screen reader, or a magnifier/reader. Students approved for note-taking assistance (for a variety of disability-related reasons) may use technology to take pictures of the whiteboard, to type notes, or record lectures.

MYTH 3: Academic accommodations create unfair advantages for students, but again, directly from the article: “In my experience, modifications to examinations, particularly extra time to complete them, rank first in triggering faculty concerns about treating all students fairly. The objective of providing individuals extra time on examinations is to measure what students have learned rather than the impact of their disability. When a student’s performance speed is a skill a professor intends to measure, extra time on an examination would not be an appropriate accommodation.” Still not convinced? Try out this demonstration on the Stroop Effect.