Meet Dan Osterbaan ’91

Greetings from Hope College!

I want to take a moment to introduce myself and my new role at Hope. I am both an alumnus and a parent of two third-generation Hope students. This April, after a 21-year career at a Fortune 250 company, I made the decision to accept a role at my alma mater focused specifically on parent engagement and philanthropy. I am grateful for the education and opportunities that Hope has provided for my family and delighted to join a team that is focused on transforming the lives of our students, our community, and our world.

One of my objectives is to engage alumni and families to expand the reach of the college via enhanced learning and vocational experiences through the Boerigter Center for Calling and Career. By establishing the Boerigter Center, Hope College is one of the few higher education institutions nationally to streamline the intersection of calling, academic advising, experiential learning, and internships/career connections. This forward-thinking was recently highlighted in a New York Times article titled, “One Way to Make College Meaningful.”

Strong and diverse networks are a key element that make these types of programs successful. Parents and alumni play an integral role in identifying and cultivating experiential learning opportunities for our students as well as expressing the value that Hope College brings to your family and community.

I look forward to connecting with you in the near future to personally hear your ideas and insights about Hope College. Together we can build the network and support the services needed to enhance students’ experiences, equipping them to impact our community and our world.

Regards,

Daniel J. Osterbaan ’91
Director of Development for Parent Giving
Development and Alumni Engagement

Find me on LinkedIn.

My Journey to Hope

My name is Yea Rang Song. I will be a junior this fall, and I am pursuing a degree in religion with an emphasis on biblical studies, German and classical studies. I plan to go to seminary after college and prepare to become a missionary like my parents; their lives as missionaries in South Africa and Zimbabwe have inspired me to help others.

Two years ago, on August 16, 2017, my plane landed at the Gerald R. Ford International Airport in Grand Rapids, Michigan. I was exhausted from a long flight from South Korea but also excited for the “dream come true” college life. I remember getting into a white van with the Hope College logo on it and setting off for Holland, Michigan to begin a new adventure.

Growing up in South Korea, South Africa and Zimbabwe, I knew I wanted to attend college, but I wasn’t sure where. I began researching different colleges, but was interested in Hope because it was recommended to me by my cousin. Unlike other colleges and universities, Hope had the best acceptance letter! All the other places sent a short email or letter congratulating me, but Hope’s was different — it was very personal. They responded to every single detail that I had written in my application essay. That is when I decided that I wanted to be part of a community like Hope College.

When I got out of the van, I found myself surrounded by a beautiful green campus. It was quiet because I had arrived a week earlier than other incoming freshmen. This was so I could attend a time of orientation designed especially for international students. This week-long series of events and activities put on by the Fried Center for Global Engagement was set up to help us learn about Hope, Holland and Michigan. My favorite part was visiting the Sleeping Bear Dunes and Mackinac Island. Looking back at this experience, I am even more grateful for the warm welcome I received and for all of the staff members at the Fried Center for Global Engagement.

Freshman year was the year of adjusting to American life. Although I had grown up in various countries as a foreigner my entire life, living in America was different. All my professors made their very best effort to make me feel more comfortable and welcome. After class, they would take time to talk to me – it felt good that they went out of their way and were willing to get to know me. Of course, there were times when I didn’t understand why people were saying certain things or doing things in a certain way, but because of these experiences, I was able to learn.

Being part of the Phelps Scholars Program allowed me to experience a more diverse community. All the professors and the students tried their best to understand students from different cultures and values. This program is also where I met my group of close friends. Knowing that there will always be a community for me made my first year at Hope easier.

I got my first job working in Print and Mail Services during the second semester of my freshman year. I learned a lot, and it helped me improve my communication skills. Even at work I felt welcomed. At the beginning of each semester, my boss brought us a meal while going over the goals for the semester. She even provided all the student workers snack bags before finals. Through her actions, I could see how much the staff at Hope cares about their students, and once again there was proof that I had made the right choice in coming to Hope.

After freshman year, I went back home for the summer. Although it was hard to leave home again, returning to Hope for my sophomore year was easier because I knew I had a community at Hope waiting for me which had become my second family. It was also the year I began working in the Development and Alumni Engagement office and learning more about fundraising. I learned how many people give back to help support students like me. In this new job, I had the great opportunity of thanking people for their gifts by writing notes to them.

All of the “different” I had experienced in the past two years was a good different. Growing up as a missionary kid, serving was always a part of my life. It was not until I started working on Hope’s campus that I realized the true meaning of reciprocal service. Serving and being served was a new life experience for me. I am looking forward to traveling to Germany to study abroad this spring and learn even more about what it means to serve in a global society. Hope College has been a blessing to me.

You can help support students like Yea Rang when you make a gift to the area that you love at hope.edu/give.

Day of Giving 2019

This was a record-breaking year, thanks to your incredible efforts. With the new “Give To What You Love” campaign, the campus community rallied around Day of Giving with incredible enthusiasm. In 36 hours, $281,395 was raised to support Hope students from over 1,500 donors. (Prior to this year, our best Day of Giving was 2017, when we received $162,101 from 855 gifts.) We couldn’t have achieved this success without your passion and collaboration — and maybe a little competition, too. What if somebody missed Day of Giving and they still want to make a gift? How exciting! Go to hope.edu/give which features an online form for making gifts.

Thank you for coming together for Hope students. Your generosity inspires us — and it tells us that you believe in the transformative power of a Hope education. We are so grateful for your enthusiastic support.

From all of us at Hope College: Thank you!

Participation Matters

“Put me in Coach, I’m ready to play today.”

In this season, many Hope LAX, SB, BB, Golf, XTC&F and 10S athletes (you know who you are by your Twitter handles) echo John Fogerty’s refrain. Wanting to play, striving to win is their mission. And don’t we all want to participate in life in some way to affect outcomes?!

Participation matters in sports, academics and co-curricular activities at Hope College. It also matters in giving to your alma mater. Numerous buildings and projects on campus are named for distinguished Hope graduates who provided a special or penultimate gift to capstone a distinctive career and lifetime of giving. The impact of such philanthropy is obvious, but Hope is built no less on gifts at a variety of levels by thousands of alumni, parents and friends. Many of the college’s major donors presented three-figure ($100+) annual gifts thirty years ago. By today’s standards, that equates to a good cup of coffee a couple times a week. While that may sound a tad hyperbolic, what is not is that their giving began and was sustained by establishing a habit. Just like that cup of coffee.

Hope requires a broad spectrum of donors to remain competitive and to keep the Hope experience accessible and affordable. Tuition and fees alone do not support the kind of Hope experience we strive to provide. Your philanthropic participation begins a journey toward a lifetime of joyful giving, bolsters our reputation scrutinized by external reviewers such as Princeton Review and U.S. News & World Report, and fortifies the value of your hard-earned degree. Your gift also leverages other gifts and grants. Many national foundations examine participation rates in advance of affirming a grant. Participation from many stakeholders is considered, including Board of Trustees (100% expected), Alumni Board, Administrative Council, Deans, faculty and alumni.

It is easy to deflect. Many constituents suggest that we seek major funding from recognized philanthropists in our region with names that include De__  or Van_____. Some also suggest the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation or Warren Buffett, even though their funding priorities are narrowly defined and their beneficiaries are often pre-selected.

Younger alumni cite their debt loads following graduation. I’m keenly aware, since my debt was equivalent to a very handsome new car. I’m also reminded that my financial aid package in the form of scholarships and Hope grants was also equivalent to a few nice cars, and made possible by donors I didn’t know or meet.

I’ve heard the chorus many times: “When I win the lottery or inherit a fortune, I’ll give a major gift to Hope.” Steady-and-regular wins the race if we participate together. Your gifts, combined with others, transform Hope and expand opportunities for students to learn, discern, serve and make a difference in communities and our world.

The transformational education that Hope has provided for more than 150 years has been possible only because of generous support. Through those many decades, Hope has been a good steward of resources entrusted by parents, friends, corporations, organizations and alumni. Hope is worthy of your investment.

Are you ready to participate?

Visit dayofgiving.hope.edu to learn how your gift, no matter the size, makes an impact. #Give2Hope

Day of Giving 2019 – Join Our Team!

Get ready!
Hope College’s Day of Giving is 14 days away. We need your voice, your networks and your enthusiasm to help promote Hope College. Please join our team on Thursday, April 11 and Friday, April 12 and become an online ambassador!

What’s an Ambassador?
An ambassador can be an alumni, parent, employee or friend that is willing to promote Day of Giving through their personal networks, especially social media using #Give2Hope. Ambassadors will receive a personal online link and be able to promote a specific category, program or department. The individual ambassador with the most gifts tied to their ambassador link will win a Hope College prize pack!

Words of the Week: Give to what you love!
This year, you can designate the area you would like to support. This option allows you to “pick your passion” and support the areas you feel most closely connected to. Help us spread the word: Give to what you love at Hope College!

Help us make the day a success. We will supply you with a toolkit full of easy to post pictures and graphics, sample posts and more. Did we mention the one-of-a-kind t-shirt? All you need to do is sign up and start promoting Hope College on your social media accounts.

Please consider helping our efforts this year and sign up to be an ambassador!

Refer A Student

Referrals from alumni and families make a difference. Once a prospective student is referred, one in five of them apply. Over the past four years, nearly 300 students are at Hope because they first connected through a referral from someone like you.

WHY HOPE?

With more than 3,500 colleges and universities in the United States alone, what makes Hope such a unique option? Well, let’s start with three words: mind, body and spirit. These are the anchors of the Hope experience. Before you reach out to the prospective Hope students in your life, brush up on why there’s never been a better time to consider Hope College.

WHO SHOULD I REFER?

Students from around the world that are currently sophomores and juniors in high school and have demonstrated leadership, service and academic performance are great candidates for a referral. We seek students who will bring a wide range of perspectives and gifts to enrich our campus community. Though admission is selective, we’ll give each completed application careful consideration and review for factors that signal future academic and social success.

WHAT SHOULD I SAY?

Feel free to share your own Hope experiences in addition to these ideas:

For those that express interest, don’t forget to suggest they apply.

HOW DO I MAKE A REFERRAL

Making a referral is easy. You simply fill out this refer a student form. There are a few required fields including:

  • Name
  • Address
  • Current school

Other items like contact information, date of birth, GPA and academic interests are not required, but are helpful if you have them.

The Hope College admissions team will follow up with individual attention to the student you recommended.

WHAT HAPPENS NEXT?

You’ll receive an email from Hope confirming your referral, and we will follow up with the student encouraging them to apply to Hope.

As a thank you for referring a student you will receive a coupon code for $10 off a purchase of $40 or more to the Hope College Bookstore.

Refer a student today!

The Alumni Postcard Project

Here in the Office of Alumni & Family Engagement, we spend a few minutes every Tuesday morning watching a TED Talk or two. We’ve learned how to overcome fears from a man who climbed a 3,000 foot cliff with no ropes, how to find joy in everyday life, and how hilarious replying to a spam email can be. These short videos have given us a lot to talk about and have also inspired us to get creative in our work. A talk about sending letters to strangers led to a discussion on other ways mail can be used to connect and inspire. Lots of crazy ideas and a few bunny trails later, someone suggested asking our 33,000+ alumni to send postcards to our students to show them where a Hope education can take them.

 

Our new Boerigter Center for Calling and Career asks students “Where will you go?” So we want to know . . . “Where did you go?”

Are you an accountant in Austin? A biologist in Boise? A choreographer in Cleveland? Regardless of where your Hope education has taken you, we want to share your journey with the Hope students who will follow you into the world. The Office of Alumni and Family Engagement and Boerigter Center for Calling and Career are teaming up to launch The Postcard Project. The mission of the project is to inspire current Hope students by showing real-life examples of the paths they could take upon graduation (or even before!)

We are asking our network of more than 33,000 alumni to grab a postcard from where they live or work (hotel gift shops, gas stations or convenience stores like Walgreen’s often carry inexpensive postcards). Then simply write your name, graduation year, major and answer to the question “Where did your Hope education take you?” on the back of the card. You can be straight forward by answering the question with your job title and company, or get creative with a short tale.

Mail your postcard to:

Hope College
Boerigter Center
141 East 12th Street
Holland, MI 49423

We will display the postcards in an installation in the Boerigter Center lobby space in DeWitt Center, allowing students to peruse the cards as they are added in a space that has been designed for them to contemplate their future plans.

You need not have won a big award, made a big discovery or rake in the big bucks to be a big help with this project. We are looking for submissions from every corner of the world and every type of profession. We want students to have a realistic representation of the options that await them – maybe they’ll even be inspired to explore professions they’ve never heard of before.

Want to get even more involved in helping students discern their calling? Sign up to be a DiscoverWork host! This program, operated by the Boerigter Center, provides students with short-term opportunities to meet with or shadow professionals in their field of interest.

Check hope.edu/alumni/events for upcoming events both regionally and near campus.

The Invitation of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

During the school year of 1962-63, Roland Marshall ’63 and Pete Paulsen ’64, with the permission of the administration and the support of student government, invited Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. to campus. Pete contacted the Office of Alumni Engagement recently to share his story:

Hope College campus, 1965

Pete Paulsen ’64 recalls that the early 1960s were years of discussion, action, turmoil, and change. Although Hope College clearly never was a Berkeley, Paulsen admits, all over campus Hope students engaged in passionate discussions about what could and should happen to address the United States’ problem with racism, its movement toward war in Vietnam, and tensions with the Soviet Union.

He confesses that his memory might not be as good today as it was when he was a student. However, it appears that his friends are able to recall even less about the courageous step they took when inviting Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. to the campus of Hope College. “Much of this history must of necessity then be conjecture,” Paulsen therefore concludes. One of his friends involved was Roland Marshall ’63, a former classmate of James Sanford. Together, the two students attended Dr. King’s speech at Ohio University during the International Student Conference of Race. Paulsen recalls his friends’ excitement about the dynamic and direct nature of Dr. King’s presentation upon their return to Hope, and the powerful impact this had on him.

Paulsen believes that this enthusiasm matched the energy Dr. King generated through his effort to address the issues with American racism. Although Paulsen is unsure about specific details, he recalls having planned an invitation of Dr. King to the campus of Hope College together with several friends. Many students placed an importance on hearing what Dr. King, a pivotal figure in the civil rights movement, had to say, and demonstrating their support of his work.

Baccalaureate 1965

Paulsen is confident that an invitation of Dr. King could not have been realized had it not been for student support and the permission of the college’s administration. Unfortunately, Dr. King was unable to visit the campus. Paulsen does not possess a copy of the initial invitation letter and of Dr. King’s response to this. He vaguely remembers having sent Dr. King another letter asking him to choose a date, and in the summer of 1963, Paulsen received a second letter from Dr. King. This indicated that the first letter had offered a specific date on which Dr. King was unavailable. Paulsen recently gave this letter to Hope’s archives. The letter reveals that due to commitments to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, Dr. King was unable to visit Hope College.

MLK Jr. Letter to Hope College student Peter Paulsen, August 1963

According to Paulsen, Hope College has been committed to traditions and historic practice while simultaneously pushing for knowledge and morally right behavior and values. “It was courageous of the college to extend this invitation and invite a challenging voice to speak on campus and to community,” he says. “We need to continue that balance.”

“It was courageous of the college to extend this invitation and invite a challenging voice to speak on campus and to community.”

Thank you, Paul, for sharing your story and this letter. As we look forward to Martin Luther King, Jr. Day on Monday, January 19, you are welcome to attend a lecture by Dr. Joy DeGruy on campus at 2:00 pm. For more information, please visit hope.edu/calendar.

10 Under 10 Award Recipient: Xander Krieg ’12

“He developed an algorithm that allows a greater understanding of facial expressions and emotions.”

Ten Under Ten Award Recipient Xander Krieg ’12

Xander Krieg graduated cum laude with a bachelor of arts degree in Japanese studies and psychology. After his time at Hope, he continued his education at the University of Hawaii where he received a master of arts degree in clinical psychology. Krieg is currently pursuing a doctor of philosophy degree in clinical psychology at the same university.

Since graduating from Hope College, Krieg has had a multi-career track in academics, business, and clinical psychology. Krieg’s scholarship and professional work have led him to spend the past few years of his life traveling between Japan and the United States, the two countries that he calls home. During his initial graduate studies, he worked as a graduate assistant and clinical practicum student at the University of Hawaii’s Center for Cognitive Behavior Therapy.

Krieg was then selected as the Fulbright-Hays Pre-Doctoral Scholar to Japan from 2015 to 2016. He completed his dissertation work at the University of Tokyo and began working for Hitotsubashi University’s Graduate School of International Corporate Strategy as a statistics and research design consultant, where he still consults today. Krieg has also spent time as a therapist and clinical staff member at the TELL Counseling Center in Tokyo, Japan. During the continuation of his education, Krieg was a doctoral intern and clinical staff member at the Student Medical and Counseling Center at Central Washington University. Throughout Krieg’s career as a businessman and academic, he has published peer-reviewed material in academic journals and books, as well as providing workshops, training, and other professional presentations both in the United States and overseas.

Krieg considers himself both a scientist and entrepreneur. In pursuit of his endeavor “to spread the science of psychology and human behavior analysis in the various local and international contexts,” Krieg co-founded Emosta, Inc., a consulting company that provides emotion AI technology to counselors, coaches, and HR consultants. As the chief research and design officer, Krieg is responsible for the design and development of the AI software.

Xavier Krieg receives the Ten Under Ten Award presented by Professor of Sociology Roger Nemeth.

The “10 Under 10 Awards” honor emerging leaders who are making significant contributions by living out their callings; engaged in the local and global community through professional and/or volunteer involvement; and use their education to think about important issues with wisdom and clarity, communicate effectively to bridge boundaries that divide human communities and act as agents of hope living faithfully into their vocations. Designed for alumni who are within 10 years of graduation, they are presented by the Hope College Alumni Association. Make a nomination today!

10 Under 10 Award Recipient: Travis Rieth ’10

“He travels North America as a photographer, writer, consultant, adventurer and advocate.”

Ten Under Ten Award Recipient Travis Rieth ’10

Travis Rieth, also known as Travis Wild, has lived a life of adventure, leadership, and service within numerous communities and through various roles. He says, “I am guessing why I was nominated for this award is not due [to] what has made up my professional career, but the life I’ve lived outside that as a writer, photographer, and someone who goes on adventures.” Rieth graduated cum laude with a bachelor of arts degree in psychology from Hope College.

Following his graduation from Hope College, Rieth worked as a primary counselor at the Dale House Project in Colorado Springs, where he worked with adolescent men and women who had been abused, homeless, in gangs, in juvenile detention, or in the foster care system in some capacity. After this position, Rieth lived homeless voluntarily in Denver in order to better understand how to empathize with a population few understand and for which he would focus on unconditional love. Rieth said he wanted to be “a Christian in a place it is desperately needed and living out love rather than just telling about it.”

This experience led Rieth to focus his efforts on speaking, writing, and leadership in the field of empathy. He has written two books: one about the adventure and lessons he gained leaving a life of comfort to live homeless for a short period of time, and the other is a children’s book for kids who have been abused or trafficked.

In 2011, he returned to Holland where he created a position at the Holland Rescue Mission focused on outreach and helping to build community programs to prevent recidivism. He led a few Hope College Greek Life retreats and coached varsity lacrosse at Holland Christian High School. Rieth then moved back out West where he worked as a Young Life mountain lodge caretaker just outside Lake Tahoe, California, where he coordinated the onsite activities and adventures for groups. From 2015 to 2017, Rieth worked as a travel director for PepsiCo, Marriott, Hewlett Packard, Mercedes, and New York Life.

Rieth founded Wild-Writes, a start-up company that provides photography, videography, design,  writing, digital and consulting services to brands in order to help better tell their stories. Outside of his work with his company, he is focusing on the publication of the books he has written and with aspirations to build on his work as a journalist and photographer. Find him on Instagram.

Travis Rieth receives his 10 Under 10 Award from Assistant Professor of Kinesiology and Volleyball Coach Becky Schmidt.

The “10 Under 10 Awards” honor emerging leaders who are making significant contributions by living out their callings; engaged in the local and global community through professional and/or volunteer involvement; and use their education to think about important issues with wisdom and clarity, communicate effectively to bridge boundaries that divide human communities and act as agents of hope living faithfully into their vocations. Designed for alumni who are within 10 years of graduation, they are presented by the Hope College Alumni Association. Make a nomination today!