Day of Giving 2019

This was a record-breaking year, thanks to your incredible efforts. With the new “Give To What You Love” campaign, the campus community rallied around Day of Giving with incredible enthusiasm. In 36 hours, $281,395 was raised to support Hope students from over 1,500 donors. (Prior to this year, our best Day of Giving was 2017, when we received $162,101 from 855 gifts.) We couldn’t have achieved this success without your passion and collaboration — and maybe a little competition, too. What if somebody missed Day of Giving and they still want to make a gift? How exciting! Go to hope.edu/give which features an online form for making gifts.

Thank you for coming together for Hope students. Your generosity inspires us — and it tells us that you believe in the transformative power of a Hope education. We are so grateful for your enthusiastic support.

From all of us at Hope College: Thank you!

Hope Grad Co-Authors Amicus Brief and Attends Arguments at Supreme Court

The U.S. Supreme Court has announced it will hear a trust tax case that has significant implications for states and trust beneficiaries. A Hope College graduate, Raj A. Malviya ’02, was part of a prestigious group of eight other national trust and estate experts who drafted and filed the amicus brief. He attended oral arguments at the Supreme Court in Washington D.C. on April 16.

The question posed in North Carolina Department of Revenue v. the Kimberley Rice Kaestner 1992 Family Trust is: Does the due process clause prohibit states from taxing trusts based on trust beneficiaries’ in-state residency? Hundreds of millions of dollars of annual tax revenue hang in the balance.

Raj’s involvement is remarkable, considering he is at a relatively early point in his career. However, for those that know him, they aren’t surprised.

Raj on Supreme Court steps
Raj Malviya ’02 on the steps of the Supreme Court on April 16 when he was in Washington D.C. for oral arguments.

Raj has been practicing law since 2005, focusing on estate and tax planning. Today he is a partner at Miller Johnson in Grand Rapids, MI. He is well versed in all aspects of planning for families with foreign ties as well as working with clients like business owners, licensed professionals, film and music artists, public figures and diplomats.

He is involved in a number of professional associations, including the American Bar Association, the State Bar of Michigan, and several sections with the Grand Rapids Bar Association.  He is also a member of the Society of Trusts & Estates Professionals. In 2014, he was appointed to the State Bar of Michigan Probate and Estate Planning Council and was selected from among many qualified candidates across the country to be a Fellow in the American Bar Association Section of Real Property, Trust and Estate Law.

Raj Malviya '02 in his office.
Raj Malviya ’02

Raj is a fellow with the American College of Trust and Estate Counsel, a group of peer-elected trust and estate attorneys from across the United States and abroad. His previous involvement with this group includes being selected as a member of the ACTEC Foundations Young Leaders Program. In 2017, he was elected a fellow by their Board of Regents.

As an advocate for diversity, he was also the co-founder and past president of the South Asian Bar Association of Michigan and served as the Michigan Liaison to the North American South Asian Bar Association where he helped form their Tax Section made up of attorneys, educators, law students and other professionals. In addition, he is an alumnus of the Fellows Program of the Leadership Council on Legal Diversity.

In 2016, Raj was one of West Michigan’s young professionals honored by the Grand Rapids Business Journal in their “40 Under Forty.”

Prior to this prestigious start to his career and true to a liberal arts background, Raj was a biology and business administration major at Hope College. He was also a member of the Omicron Kappa Epsilon fraternity and the men’ tennis team on which he held a 55-22 career record in singles and a 46-18 career record in doubles.

After Hope, he went on to earn his LL.M. in Taxation from Northwestern University Pritzker School of Law and his JD from Valparaiso University School of Law.

This trust income tax case is already getting national attention from a variety of media outlets including Forbes and Bloomberg.

For his part, Raj had this to say about the experience, “It was a privilege to collaborate with national experts on the ACTEC brief. The fiduciary income tax nexus rules across the states are nowhere close to being uniform and vary considerably in scope. Our goal was to provide education to the Court and focus the issues that govern this complex area of tax law. We felt that our brief made a meaningful impact in the case.”

Participation Matters

“Put me in Coach, I’m ready to play today.”

In this season, many Hope LAX, SB, BB, Golf, XTC&F and 10S athletes (you know who you are by your Twitter handles) echo John Fogerty’s refrain. Wanting to play, striving to win is their mission. And don’t we all want to participate in life in some way to affect outcomes?!

Participation matters in sports, academics and co-curricular activities at Hope College. It also matters in giving to your alma mater. Numerous buildings and projects on campus are named for distinguished Hope graduates who provided a special or penultimate gift to capstone a distinctive career and lifetime of giving. The impact of such philanthropy is obvious, but Hope is built no less on gifts at a variety of levels by thousands of alumni, parents and friends. Many of the college’s major donors presented three-figure ($100+) annual gifts thirty years ago. By today’s standards, that equates to a good cup of coffee a couple times a week. While that may sound a tad hyperbolic, what is not is that their giving began and was sustained by establishing a habit. Just like that cup of coffee.

Hope requires a broad spectrum of donors to remain competitive and to keep the Hope experience accessible and affordable. Tuition and fees alone do not support the kind of Hope experience we strive to provide. Your philanthropic participation begins a journey toward a lifetime of joyful giving, bolsters our reputation scrutinized by external reviewers such as Princeton Review and U.S. News & World Report, and fortifies the value of your hard-earned degree. Your gift also leverages other gifts and grants. Many national foundations examine participation rates in advance of affirming a grant. Participation from many stakeholders is considered, including Board of Trustees (100% expected), Alumni Board, Administrative Council, Deans, faculty and alumni.

It is easy to deflect. Many constituents suggest that we seek major funding from recognized philanthropists in our region with names that include De__  or Van_____. Some also suggest the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation or Warren Buffett, even though their funding priorities are narrowly defined and their beneficiaries are often pre-selected.

Younger alumni cite their debt loads following graduation. I’m keenly aware, since my debt was equivalent to a very handsome new car. I’m also reminded that my financial aid package in the form of scholarships and Hope grants was also equivalent to a few nice cars, and made possible by donors I didn’t know or meet.

I’ve heard the chorus many times: “When I win the lottery or inherit a fortune, I’ll give a major gift to Hope.” Steady-and-regular wins the race if we participate together. Your gifts, combined with others, transform Hope and expand opportunities for students to learn, discern, serve and make a difference in communities and our world.

The transformational education that Hope has provided for more than 150 years has been possible only because of generous support. Through those many decades, Hope has been a good steward of resources entrusted by parents, friends, corporations, organizations and alumni. Hope is worthy of your investment.

Are you ready to participate?

Visit dayofgiving.hope.edu to learn how your gift, no matter the size, makes an impact. #Give2Hope

Day of Giving 2019 – Join Our Team!

Get ready!
Hope College’s Day of Giving is 14 days away. We need your voice, your networks and your enthusiasm to help promote Hope College. Please join our team on Thursday, April 11 and Friday, April 12 and become an online ambassador!

What’s an Ambassador?
An ambassador can be an alumni, parent, employee or friend that is willing to promote Day of Giving through their personal networks, especially social media using #Give2Hope. Ambassadors will receive a personal online link and be able to promote a specific category, program or department. The individual ambassador with the most gifts tied to their ambassador link will win a Hope College prize pack!

Words of the Week: Give to what you love!
This year, you can designate the area you would like to support. This option allows you to “pick your passion” and support the areas you feel most closely connected to. Help us spread the word: Give to what you love at Hope College!

Help us make the day a success. We will supply you with a toolkit full of easy to post pictures and graphics, sample posts and more. Did we mention the one-of-a-kind t-shirt? All you need to do is sign up and start promoting Hope College on your social media accounts.

Please consider helping our efforts this year and sign up to be an ambassador!

Frances Traisman ’89 Gets Ready for MLB Opening Day in Tokyo, Japan

Joe DiMaggio once said that Opening Day for Major League Baseball is “like a birthday party when you’re a kid.” For generations, the day has symbolized a fresh start and a sure sign of spring. This year, for one Hope College alumna, opening day will start early. Really early.

On March 20 at 2:35 AM Pacific Daylight Time, eight days and several hours before the rest of the league, Frances Schrock ’89 Traisman will be cheering on the Seattle Mariners as they play an international opener in the Tokyo Dome against the Oakland Athletics.

The Mariners have been connected to Japan since Nintendo purchased a majority of the team in 1992. They have had Japanese players on the roster every year since 1996. That is the same year that Frances Traisman was hired. Now as Senior Vice President of Sales, the former Hope College English major oversees business development and revenue generation through ticket sales, corporate partnerships, sponsorships, radio broadcast sales, customer engagement and analytics.

Frances Schrock ’89 Traisman

After graduation in 1989, Frances spent a year in China teaching English to college students in Hangzhou. A fellow teacher she met there encouraged her to move to Washington, D.C. She eventually landed a ticket sales job at the US Senior Open golf tournament at Congressional Country Club. She loved it. After the tournament, she and her husband, Cliff, packed up a moving truck and their yellow Labrador, Tuco, and headed for Washington (state this time). There, they started a family and their new careers.

Now in her 23rd year with the Seattle Mariners, Frances shares that she enjoys the benefits of her liberal arts education every day. “In our ever-changing world, having broad knowledge of a variety of subjects has made it easier to navigate the changes,” says Traisman who was part of Sigma Sigma and the Vienna Summer School during her Hope days. “Whether evaluating capital improvement projects, researching business development opportunities, or making sales presentations, I draw on a variety of skills and experiences gained at Hope.”

The connections she made while at Hope have also been instrumental in determining where she is today. Her travels to China were at the suggestion of a fellow Hope graduate, and she was introduced to her husband by one of her best friends from Hope. While she has been geographically separated from Hope for a long time, the Hope community continues to play a strong and supportive role in her life.

“Smart people with a curious nature and a broad familiarity of how the world is connected are key – and those are the type of graduates Hope produces.”

As she thinks about today’s students, she says “there are tremendous opportunities in sports and entertainment, especially in the world of data analytics. While it’s important to have someone to write code and structure data, it is as important, if not more so, to have people who can bring the data to life and use it to recommend improvements. Smart people with a curious nature and a broad familiarity of how the world is connected are key – and those are the type of graduates Hope produces.”

Frances’s advice to students interested in a career like hers is to do your research and talk to as many people as you can. Many opportunities exist in sports management, you just need to find the one that fits you.

Wake up early, brew some coffee and tune in to the opening games in Japan on March 20 & 21 on ESPN at 5:35 AM EDT.

Refer A Student

Referrals from alumni and families make a difference. Once a prospective student is referred, one in five of them apply. Over the past four years, nearly 300 students are at Hope because they first connected through a referral from someone like you.

WHY HOPE?

With more than 3,500 colleges and universities in the United States alone, what makes Hope such a unique option? Well, let’s start with three words: mind, body and spirit. These are the anchors of the Hope experience. Before you reach out to the prospective Hope students in your life, brush up on why there’s never been a better time to consider Hope College.

WHO SHOULD I REFER?

Students from around the world that are currently sophomores and juniors in high school and have demonstrated leadership, service and academic performance are great candidates for a referral. We seek students who will bring a wide range of perspectives and gifts to enrich our campus community. Though admission is selective, we’ll give each completed application careful consideration and review for factors that signal future academic and social success.

WHAT SHOULD I SAY?

Feel free to share your own Hope experiences in addition to these ideas:

For those that express interest, don’t forget to suggest they apply.

HOW DO I MAKE A REFERRAL

Making a referral is easy. You simply fill out this refer a student form. There are a few required fields including:

  • Name
  • Address
  • Current school

Other items like contact information, date of birth, GPA and academic interests are not required, but are helpful if you have them.

The Hope College admissions team will follow up with individual attention to the student you recommended.

WHAT HAPPENS NEXT?

You’ll receive an email from Hope confirming your referral, and we will follow up with the student encouraging them to apply to Hope.

As a thank you for referring a student you will receive a coupon code for $10 off a purchase of $40 or more to the Hope College Bookstore.

Refer a student today!

The Alumni Postcard Project

Here in the Office of Alumni & Family Engagement, we spend a few minutes every Tuesday morning watching a TED Talk or two. We’ve learned how to overcome fears from a man who climbed a 3,000 foot cliff with no ropes, how to find joy in everyday life, and how hilarious replying to a spam email can be. These short videos have given us a lot to talk about and have also inspired us to get creative in our work. A talk about sending letters to strangers led to a discussion on other ways mail can be used to connect and inspire. Lots of crazy ideas and a few bunny trails later, someone suggested asking our 33,000+ alumni to send postcards to our students to show them where a Hope education can take them.

 

Our new Boerigter Center for Calling and Career asks students “Where will you go?” So we want to know . . . “Where did you go?”

Are you an accountant in Austin? A biologist in Boise? A choreographer in Cleveland? Regardless of where your Hope education has taken you, we want to share your journey with the Hope students who will follow you into the world. The Office of Alumni and Family Engagement and Boerigter Center for Calling and Career are teaming up to launch The Postcard Project. The mission of the project is to inspire current Hope students by showing real-life examples of the paths they could take upon graduation (or even before!)

We are asking our network of more than 33,000 alumni to grab a postcard from where they live or work (hotel gift shops, gas stations or convenience stores like Walgreen’s often carry inexpensive postcards). Then simply write your name, graduation year, major and answer to the question “Where did your Hope education take you?” on the back of the card. You can be straight forward by answering the question with your job title and company, or get creative with a short tale.

Mail your postcard to:

Hope College
Boerigter Center
141 East 12th Street
Holland, MI 49423

We will display the postcards in an installation in the Boerigter Center lobby space in DeWitt Center, allowing students to peruse the cards as they are added in a space that has been designed for them to contemplate their future plans.

You need not have won a big award, made a big discovery or rake in the big bucks to be a big help with this project. We are looking for submissions from every corner of the world and every type of profession. We want students to have a realistic representation of the options that await them – maybe they’ll even be inspired to explore professions they’ve never heard of before.

Want to get even more involved in helping students discern their calling? Sign up to be a DiscoverWork host! This program, operated by the Boerigter Center, provides students with short-term opportunities to meet with or shadow professionals in their field of interest.

Check hope.edu/alumni/events for upcoming events both regionally and near campus.

The Invitation of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

During the school year of 1962-63, Roland Marshall ’63 and Pete Paulsen ’64, with the permission of the administration and the support of student government, invited Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. to campus. Pete contacted the Office of Alumni Engagement recently to share his story:

Hope College campus, 1965

Pete Paulsen ’64 recalls that the early 1960s were years of discussion, action, turmoil, and change. Although Hope College clearly never was a Berkeley, Paulsen admits, all over campus Hope students engaged in passionate discussions about what could and should happen to address the United States’ problem with racism, its movement toward war in Vietnam, and tensions with the Soviet Union.

He confesses that his memory might not be as good today as it was when he was a student. However, it appears that his friends are able to recall even less about the courageous step they took when inviting Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. to the campus of Hope College. “Much of this history must of necessity then be conjecture,” Paulsen therefore concludes. One of his friends involved was Roland Marshall ’63, a former classmate of James Sanford. Together, the two students attended Dr. King’s speech at Ohio University during the International Student Conference of Race. Paulsen recalls his friends’ excitement about the dynamic and direct nature of Dr. King’s presentation upon their return to Hope, and the powerful impact this had on him.

Paulsen believes that this enthusiasm matched the energy Dr. King generated through his effort to address the issues with American racism. Although Paulsen is unsure about specific details, he recalls having planned an invitation of Dr. King to the campus of Hope College together with several friends. Many students placed an importance on hearing what Dr. King, a pivotal figure in the civil rights movement, had to say, and demonstrating their support of his work.

Baccalaureate 1965

Paulsen is confident that an invitation of Dr. King could not have been realized had it not been for student support and the permission of the college’s administration. Unfortunately, Dr. King was unable to visit the campus. Paulsen does not possess a copy of the initial invitation letter and of Dr. King’s response to this. He vaguely remembers having sent Dr. King another letter asking him to choose a date, and in the summer of 1963, Paulsen received a second letter from Dr. King. This indicated that the first letter had offered a specific date on which Dr. King was unavailable. Paulsen recently gave this letter to Hope’s archives. The letter reveals that due to commitments to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, Dr. King was unable to visit Hope College.

MLK Jr. Letter to Hope College student Peter Paulsen, August 1963

According to Paulsen, Hope College has been committed to traditions and historic practice while simultaneously pushing for knowledge and morally right behavior and values. “It was courageous of the college to extend this invitation and invite a challenging voice to speak on campus and to community,” he says. “We need to continue that balance.”

“It was courageous of the college to extend this invitation and invite a challenging voice to speak on campus and to community.”

Thank you, Paul, for sharing your story and this letter. As we look forward to Martin Luther King, Jr. Day on Monday, January 19, you are welcome to attend a lecture by Dr. Joy DeGruy on campus at 2:00 pm. For more information, please visit hope.edu/calendar.

Hope Alumni Bring Unique Perspectives to the Tech Industry

One of the best parts of my job is meeting some of Hope’s 33,000 alumni on their home turf. With graduates living in all 50 states and over 80 countries around the world, the opportunities for connections are endless. Whether it’s entrepreneurs from Nairobi, newly found connections in Tokyo or young alumni making their mark in Chicago, it is inspiring to meet alumni as they pursue lives of leadership and service in a global society.

This exciting professional privilege reached new heights during a trip last fall to California and Washington State. In part because of a new partnership between the office of Alumni Engagement and the new Boerigter Center for Calling and Career, my goal was to establish connections with alumni in technology to share with current students on campus.

We have over 1,750 alumni living in states with Pacific shores. As you might expect, a fair number, over 600 in fact, live in the San Francisco and Seattle areas. Many of them, also as you might expect, work in the tech industry. This was the focus of my trip.

I had a great visit with Eva at Joanie’s Cafe. Her story of creating community within her field is inspiring.
I had a great visit with Eva at Joanie’s Cafe. Her story of creating community within her field is inspiring.

After Lyft rides during the first 24 hours in the Bay Area in two Lexuses, a Mercedes and a BMW, I knew I was not in Holland, Michigan anymore. My first appointment was in downtown Palo Alto with Eva Gaumond ’90. She has had an accomplished career as a user experience (UX) leader, often fostering collaboration and utilizing empathy she learned as a psychology major at Hope to get to the heart of user needs. After moving to the area and wishing there were more professional development opportunities in her field, she simply created them herself, co-founding a now 2,400 member non-profit professional UX organization from the ground up. It was an impressive start to my day.

Facebook’s new headquarters, MPK20.
Part of Facebook’s new headquarters, MPK21.

After breakfast, I made the short six mile trip out to Facebook’s new headquarters, MPK20. Designed by world-famous architect Frank Gehry, the 430,000-square-foot space, spread over 22 acres, is LEED-certified and boasts a 9-acre green roof (complete with work cabanas) and underground parking lot. While entering this compound of an office building was a unique experience, what made it even more meaningful was connecting with a friend now working inside.

I first met David Moore ’10 when he was an intern in the alumni office. From there he joined the Canadian digital marketing and e-commerce team at Gordon Food Service in Grand Rapids before moving to Philadelphia to work at a start-up using machine learning to personalize websites and apps. Now David counts himself fortunate to live in San Francisco where he works in product management on video products at Facebook. We were joined for lunch by another Hope alumnus, Josh Metzler ’99, who has been a software engineer at Facebook for the last seven years. A chemistry and religion major while at Hope, Josh is a self-taught coder who has now been working for the world’s largest social media company for longer than most of its 25,000 employees.

Facebook employees and Hope College alumni, David Moore ’10 and Josh Metzler ’99, take a break to talk about their Hope College experiences.
Facebook employees and Hope College alumni, David Moore ’10 and Josh Metzler ’99, take a break to talk about their Hope College experiences.

The Indian cuisine at Facebook is legit. Over naan and tandoori chicken we discussed how a liberal arts background has shaped how they solve problems at work. They shared that Hope gave them the freedom and supportive community to be curious. Then David told me this story: A friend of his visited during a semester off at Harvard and attended a class at Hope with him. Afterwards the friend remarked, “that was a better class than I’ve experienced yet in Cambridge – intimate, thoughtful, engaging.” At the time, David wasn’t sure he believed him. Now, after applying his Hope experience in Menlo Park, he thinks he does.

“Hope gave them the freedom and supportive community to be curious.”

Influenced by courses like creative writing and religion, these Facebook staffers talked about technology as being about understanding the deeper needs people have – some they can share, some that they can’t. Their work is focused on bringing the world closer together and understanding people’s perspectives. This way of thinking not only makes for a better interface on an app, but also helps to figure out how machine learning can help identify bad actors.

Golden Gate Bridge
After an evening enjoying some of the sights in San Francisco, I spent the next day connecting with alumni at Google and Tesla. At the Googleplex in Mountain View, a gathering of Hope alumni Googlers met over breakfast. In a testament to the longevity and relevancy of a liberal arts background, we had graduates from each of the last five consecutive decades represented.

Crossing the commencement stage back in Holland with dates ranging from 1979 to 2018, these product directors, software engineers and recruiting coordinators compared notes on what can help a graduate of this decade stand out. The consensus was that students should articulate the soft skills they have developed through a liberal arts education — skills like teamwork, problem solving and communication — alongside demonstrated hard skills developed through experiences like coding competitions, proficiency in programming and scripting languages.

“Students should articulate the soft skills they have developed through a liberal arts education — skills like teamwork, problem solving and communication.”

Google employees outside the Googleplex headquarters.
Karl Rasche ’00 (Senior Software Engineer), Ron Heiby ’79 (Technical Program Manager), Chris Turkstra ’93 (Product Director for Google Assistant), Douglas Van Wieren ’88 (Software and Site Reliability Engineer), and Josias Sanon ’18 (Recruiting Coordinator).

Later in the day, at a new Tesla office building in North Bay, you could sense the fast pace of innovation. There I connected with Blair Williams ’10 and Randy Johnson ’07. They shared how the undergraduate research program and international exchange programs sparked their interest in language and culture and opened the door for graduate experiences at places like Stanford, which in turn opened doors in Silicon Valley. They also shared how a liberal arts background has helped them to be well-rounded and not just technical. Through experiences at Hope they were able to wrestle with philosophical, societal, and spiritual questions, improve writing and communication skills, and becoming well prepared for working on cross-functional teams. The icing on the cake was the personal relationships with research advisors and senior seminar professors that turned into personal friendships which have shaped their lives in immeasurable ways.

“A liberal arts background has helped them to be well-rounded and not just technical.”

Blair Williams '10 and Randy Johnson '07 at Tesla.
Blair Williams ’10 and Randy Johnson ’07 at Tesla.

After two hours in flight over the peaks of Mt. St Helens, Mt. Adams and Mt. Rainier, I landed in Seattle. Among other alumni and employer connections, I met Thao Le ’11. Today she is a senior financial analyst at Amazon. Just a few years ago she was an international student at Hope College from Vietnam. While at Hope she majored in accounting and had internships at The Stow Company and Perrigo. Her first job after Hope was with Deloitte in Seattle working on an audit team. Traveling frequently while working with international teams at Amazon, she now uses leadership development and cross-cultural skills honed at Hope as a member of Mortar Board, Phelps Scholars and Hope Asian Perspective Association. We toured a new Amazon Go store and The Spheres, Amazon’s innovative downtown hub that brings a direct link to nature to Amazon employees. With her office right down the street, Thao shared that she enjoys working and visiting this unique home to more than 40,000 plants from the cloud forest regions of over 30 countries.

Thao Le ’11 shows off The Spheres at Amazon in downtown Seattle.

Once I was back on campus the next week, it was time to share lessons learned from these alumni with colleagues and students. Their stories can serve both as inspiration for future generations of Hope College students and for other alumni to get involved.

If you are interested in sharing your own career expertise, hosting a student or hiring a Hope graduate, complete the form at hope.edu/impact and a member of our team will be in touch with next steps.

10 Under 10 Award Recipient: Xander Krieg ’12

“He developed an algorithm that allows a greater understanding of facial expressions and emotions.”

Ten Under Ten Award Recipient Xander Krieg ’12

Xander Krieg graduated cum laude with a bachelor of arts degree in Japanese studies and psychology. After his time at Hope, he continued his education at the University of Hawaii where he received a master of arts degree in clinical psychology. Krieg is currently pursuing a doctor of philosophy degree in clinical psychology at the same university.

Since graduating from Hope College, Krieg has had a multi-career track in academics, business, and clinical psychology. Krieg’s scholarship and professional work have led him to spend the past few years of his life traveling between Japan and the United States, the two countries that he calls home. During his initial graduate studies, he worked as a graduate assistant and clinical practicum student at the University of Hawaii’s Center for Cognitive Behavior Therapy.

Krieg was then selected as the Fulbright-Hays Pre-Doctoral Scholar to Japan from 2015 to 2016. He completed his dissertation work at the University of Tokyo and began working for Hitotsubashi University’s Graduate School of International Corporate Strategy as a statistics and research design consultant, where he still consults today. Krieg has also spent time as a therapist and clinical staff member at the TELL Counseling Center in Tokyo, Japan. During the continuation of his education, Krieg was a doctoral intern and clinical staff member at the Student Medical and Counseling Center at Central Washington University. Throughout Krieg’s career as a businessman and academic, he has published peer-reviewed material in academic journals and books, as well as providing workshops, training, and other professional presentations both in the United States and overseas.

Krieg considers himself both a scientist and entrepreneur. In pursuit of his endeavor “to spread the science of psychology and human behavior analysis in the various local and international contexts,” Krieg co-founded Emosta, Inc., a consulting company that provides emotion AI technology to counselors, coaches, and HR consultants. As the chief research and design officer, Krieg is responsible for the design and development of the AI software.

Xavier Krieg receives the Ten Under Ten Award presented by Professor of Sociology Roger Nemeth.

The “10 Under 10 Awards” honor emerging leaders who are making significant contributions by living out their callings; engaged in the local and global community through professional and/or volunteer involvement; and use their education to think about important issues with wisdom and clarity, communicate effectively to bridge boundaries that divide human communities and act as agents of hope living faithfully into their vocations. Designed for alumni who are within 10 years of graduation, they are presented by the Hope College Alumni Association. Make a nomination today!