SPS Sponsored research talks by three Hope students:

Friday, September 15 at 3:00pm

  • “Depolarization and Scattering Signatures of Spherical Particles”
    by Yong Chul Yoon
  • “Comparing Electrochemical Calculations and Particle Induced X-Ray Emission Measurements of Prussian Blue Analogue Deposits”
    by Scott Joffre
  • “Automated Characterization of Fluxon Electrodynamics”
    by Alexander Medema

Stories of Hope: Hope Astrophysicists

Seeing Stars

Time travel, long imagined by writers and dreamers, is not as far-fetched as you might believe. Sure, it seems fantastical and improbable — the imaginings of which are only meant for postulations and movies — but astrophysicists do it all the time.

And so did Hope College freshman Jeff Engle in the summer of 2016 at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. All it took was expensive, highly powered, one-of-a-kind stellar equipment called the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope. That and funding and guidance from the Hope College physics department and Professor Dr. Peter Gonthier.

read more…

Seminar: Celebration of Undergraduate Research and Creative Performance

Hope’s Celebration of Undergraduate Research and Creative Performance is a culminating event for many students to showcase their work to students, faculty, family and community members.

Friday, April 21, 2017
Richard & Helen DeVos Fieldhouse
2:30–5 p.m.

Physics major works on experiment at MSU-NSCL

Cole Persch at MSU-NSCL on Feb 16, 2017

Cole Persch spent the day working with Dr. DeYoung at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University.

 Most of the day we were helping out with SuN, a machine used to study supernovas. I also sat in on a meeting to discuss another experiment.

Congratulations Caitlin Taylor

Caitlin Taylor

Caitlin Talyor (’12) has earned her PhD in Materials Science & Engineering from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville!

She is now working at Sandia National Laboratories, in the ion beam laboratory in Albuquerque.

In the ion beam lab, I am using in-situ TEM to study the effects of radiation damage on materials being considered for nuclear applications.  We can irradiate TEM samples with various heavy ion beams (e.g. Au, typically ~2 MeV range for in-situ experiments, used to simulate neutron irradiation damage, for example) and gas (e.g. He, typically keV range) beams and take videos during the irradiation to study damage evolution as a function of time/damage dose/gas concentration.

Congratulations Caitlin!