Hope College Digital Commons Redesign

The Digital Commons @ Hope College institutional repository, a digital collection of scholarship, creative work, and history at Hope College, was recently redesigned with a fresh new look and renamed.  Digital Commons @ Hope College is now Hope College Digital Commons!  

 

(Please note: It may be necessary for you to clear your web browser’s cache to view the new site correctly.)

Hope College Digital Commons promotes discovery and research, and helps to highlight the scholarly output and history of the college, by providing open access to a wide range of resources created by Hope faculty, students, and staff.  Resources include faculty publications and presentations, college publications, and materials from the Joint Archives of Holland.  

 

Visit the repository to:

    

 

If you are faculty member and interested in making your scholarly work accessible in Hope College Digital Commons, visit this LibGuide for further information.

 

Please contact digitalcommons@hope.edu if you have any questions.

 

Jeremy Barney

Metadata and Digital Collections Librarian

iHope for Spring 2018

You may have seen our display, “I Hope…”, asking what you wish for 2018. As we turn to a new year what do you hope to do in the Library this semester?

Perhaps you want to meet with a Research and Instruction Librarian about a research paper this semester.

Maybe you want to finally learn how to use iMovie with the help of the TechLab.

It could be that you’re looking for a good spot to keep your head down and study for Calculus or English class.  Great news — we have four new student study rooms on the 3rd floor overlooking College Ave!

Faculty, perhaps this is the year you submit your publication information to our Digital Commons repository!

Maybe your goal is simply to check out a book, DVD or CD  from Van Wylen!

Perhaps this is the semester you find articles and books from other libraries for your paper or project. Don’t forget to plan ahead!

Whatever your goal, we’re here to help!

Laptops, Cameras and Calculators, Oh My!

What equipment can you borrow from the library? Are you wondering if there is a Macbook, Chromebook, or GoPro camera available right now? Did you know we lend graphing calculators as well as headphones?

The NEW Equipment Lending LibGuide shows exactly what equipment we have at the Media Deskon the second floor and also what is currently available or checked out.  The platform views well on any mobile device or computer!

 

New Check Out Periods at the Library

We simplified the check out periods of our library’s items this summer.  Highlights from some of our most-used items are below.  Don’t worry, you don’t have to memorize this!  You will receive due dates upon checkout and you can also check your account 24/7 online using your 1Hope username and password!

Hope students Hope faculty Hope staff
Van Wylen Books 4 weeks, 1 renewal 6 months, 1 renewal 4 weeks, 1 renewal
Van Wylen DVD/VHS/CD 1 week, no renewal 2 weeks, 1 renewal 1 week, no renewal
Van Wylen Reference books 1 week, no renewal 2 weeks, 1 renewal 1 week, no renewal
MeLCat books 3 weeks, 1 renewal 3 weeks, 1 renewal 3 weeks, 1 renewal
MeLCat DVD/VHS/CD 1 week, no renewal 1 week, no renewal 1 week, no renewal
Laptops 4 hours, no renewal 24 hours, no renewal 4 hours, no renewal
iPads/cameras 4 days, no renewal 4 days, no renewal 4 days, no renewal
Kindle 4 weeks, 1 renewal 4 weeks, 1 renewal 4 weeks, 1 renewal

books waiting to go back on the shelves

Are You Well-Read*?

Now that we better understand that getting news from social media (especially Facebook and Twitter) and Google is not such a great idea (filter bubbles! Fake news!), how can busy students stay current with the latest, credible news?

Van Wylen has you covered!

We offer a vast array of newspapers and magazines that stand at the ready for you to stop in, settle in a comfortable chair, and fill your mind with stories written by professional journalists with a wide array of opinions and stories. While the following titles are all available in print, many have online versions as well. A regular reading habit can help you develop interesting anecdotes and opinions to wow your friends and colleagues at your next social gathering, find a controversial topic for your ENG 113 paper, or even impress a recruiter when you are looking for a job.

Here are the details on a sampling of the publications you may consider adding to your regular rotation:

Environment (UF767 .S33)

Is climate change happening? This publication offers both peer-reviewed articles as well as commentaries from practitioners and researchers, approaching issues from an intersection of development and the environment.

 

National Review (AP2 .N3545)

Founded by founded by author and influential, conservative thinker William F. Buckley Jr. in 1955, it is important to note that the online version of this news magazine is under different editorial control. Wondering what the differences are? That sounds like a great research project.

 

The Crisis (E185.5 .C92)

Founded in part of W.E.B. DuBois in 1910, this publication is the official publication of the NAACP. It seeks to “educate and challenge its readers about issues facing African Americans and other communities of color.”

 

The Weekly Standard (E839.5 .W44)

A conservative leaning, weekly opinion magazine, The Weekly Standard has been published since the mid-1990s. Pieces are nuanced and timely and cover both national and international topics. A recent article discusses the overabundance of “anonymice” in journalism.

The Christian Century (BR1 .C45)

Carrying the tagline, “thinking critically, living faithfully,” this biweekly publication has been in circulation since 1884. A staple of mainline Protestantism, the magazine covers religious news as well as book, media, and art reviews. Poetry is scattered throughout each issue.

 

The Economist (HG11 .E2)

A British weekly news magazine in publication since 1843, the Economist’s editors write from an economic liberalism perspective. Its most recent issue was dedicated to a special report on the oil industry. Other recent issues report on the rise of nationalism and Donald Trump.

 

Mother Jones (AP2 .M79193)

A progressive magazine covering politics, the environment, human rights, and culture, an article from a recent issue discusses a start-up’s plans to produce milk from genetically modified yeast – no cow needed.

 

The Nation (AP2 .N2)

The oldest continually published weekly news magazine (since 1865), the Nation publishes stories on politics and culture with a progressive/liberal/radical slant.

 

 

Maclean’s (AP5 .M2)

A Canadian magazine (similar to our Time magazine) published since 1905 and including articles on politics, news, arts and culture. Always interesting to break out of our filter bubbles and see what people living in another country are thinking/reading/watching.

 

The Atlantic Monthly (AP2 .A8)

In publication since 1857, the Atlantic publishes literary and cultural commentary. An article in the most recent issue delves into the age-old question of whether we need to eradicate cats, which happen to be listed in the top 100 of the Global Invasive Species list.

 

The Advocate (AP2 .A36)

A general interest magazine that includes articles on news, politics, opinion, and the arts. It is the oldest LGBT magazine in the United States.

 

 

Wired (TK5105.5 .W57)

Not to be overlooked as just another magazine selling technology, Wired writes about how technology affects culture, the economy, and politics. A current article frames coding as the next, big blue-collar job market.

 

 

New Republic (AP2 .N624)

A long-running magazine (published since 1914!) that offers commentary on politics and the arts. Of note: lots of books reviews.

 

 

Ms (HQ1101 .M72)

A feminist, activist magazine.  Of note for marketing/media students: the last page of each issue features a selection of questionable gender-based advertising.

 

 

*The notion of being well-read comes to us from Shakespeare’s Henry IV,  Part 1:

Mort. In faith he was a worthy Gentleman,

Exceeding well read, and profited,

In strange Concealements:

Valiant as a Lyon, and wondrous affable,

1700And as bountifull, as Mynes of India

 

Shakespeare, William. Henry IV, Part 1 (Folio 1 1623) (Modern). Ed. Rosemary Gaby. Internet Shakespeare Editions. University of Victoria, 6 Mar. 2017. Web. 6 Mar. 2013. <http://internetshakespeare.uvic.ca/doc/1H4_F1/complete/>.

–Jen Holman, Electronic Resources Librarian

Check out our DVD collection!

 

Looking for something to watch this weekend?  The library has more than 3,500 DVDs to choose from, including Academy Award winners, new releases, cult classics, foreign films, as well as many other categories.DVD section If you have suggestions for DVDs we should purchase, please let us know! And if you’re a fan of grainy VHS tapes, we still have over 2,000 of those.  During the summer we divided the two collections so that DVDs and VHS tapes are no longer intermingled.  Both collections are next to each other on the 2nd floor of the library, close to the top of the stairs.  Searching HopeCat is the best way to find out if we own any particular title.  You can even do searches such as “show me a list of all the Japanese language films in the library.”  Stop by the Research Help Desk and we’ll show you how.

Over the past few years we have been replacing VHS tapes that were still being used with their DVD version, if available.  Many older tapes have not been released on DVD so we cannot replace everything.  If there is a VHS tape you are interested in having available on DVD, please contact Dave O’Brien (obriend@hope.edu).

Library Support for the Hateful Things/Resilience Exhibit

 

Now through October 7th the DePree Gallery is hosting a dual exhibition, IMG_6443“Hateful Things / Resilience.” This exhibit features racist memorabilia from the Jim Crow Museum at Ferris State University, in parallel with works by major contemporary African American artists. The exhibit is “intended to encourage thoughtful, sensitive, and scholarly dialog concerning the history of race in America and how it was portrayed and persists in visual culture and fine art.”

Van Wylen Library has created a companion display of library resources to support the exhibit. It includes many of the books that are referenced in the Hateful Things exhibition, as well other resources highlighting the work of the Contemporary African American artists who are featured in Resilience, including Sanford Biggers, Faith Ringgold, and Romare Bearden. These materials can be browsed in the library or checked out for further research. Additional resources, including streaming videos, are available at http://libguides.hope.edu/hatefulthingsresilience

The exhibit also features a limited edition pop-up book by prominent IMG_6440contemporary artist Kara Walker, entitled Freedom : a fable : a curious interpretation of the wit of a negress in troubled times. In much of her art Walker uses powerful black silhouettes, many of which utilize racial stereotypes to confront the viewer around issues of slavery, power, race, gender and sexuality. This particular piece “tells the story of a female slave whose life after emancipation veers far from her dreams of meritocracy, revealing that Freedom, a Fable is not just the title of the work but is also the lesson to be learned.”

This piece was commissioned by the Peter Norton Family in 1997 and donated to Hope College by David Kamansky and Gerald Wheaton as a part of a significant gift of art and art books given to the Kruizenga Art Museum and Van Wylen Library. If you would like to view this book in person or show it in a class, contact Jessica Hronchek.

Please come explore these materials and deepen the campus conversation around this important topic!