Independent Voices — Digital Alternative Press Comes to Hope

Feminist Voice

Independent Voices: An Open Access Collection of an Alternative Press is now available through the library. These periodicals were produced by feminists, dissident GIs, campus radicals, Native Americans, anti-war activists, Black Power advocates, Hispanics, LGBT activists, the extreme right-wing press and alternative literary magazines during the latter half of the 20th century (60’s, 70’s, and 80’s). The collection currently contains 14,097 issues.

Broken Arrow

Whether researching topics like peace activist A.J. Muste, the American Indian Movement,  the National Organization of Women or Vietnam War draft resistance,  Independent Voices provides access to sources not elsewhere available.

Black Americans for Democracy

 

 

Drawn from the special collections of participating libraries across the country, Independent Voices is made possible by the funding support received from libraries and donors across the U.S., Canada and the U.K. Through their funding, these libraries and donors are demonstrating their commitment to open access digital collections. Produced by Reveal Digital, access has been arranged through the library’s membership with the Center for Research Libraries.

How do Students Use Library Books? 

As the circulation of print books by students continues to decline and access to e-books become ubiquitous, the library is working to develop monograph collection strategies that consider the impact of new technologies on reading styles, communication preferences and learning outcomes. The Library is seeking to understand how Hope students are using library books and which formats they prefer (print or e-books).

The library will be conducting a brief in-person iPad survey to gather information about how students use library books. This survey is not asking about textbooks, only library books in the library collections.

Students can take the survey Monday March 30 (today) through Sunday April 12. Look for it in several locations around campus including the lobby of Van Wylen, Cook Dining, Phelps, Cool Beans and the Martha Miller Rotunda.

This survey takes less than 3 minutes to complete and students will receive a small gift for their time.

The library is also conducting the HEDS Research Practices Survey for First Year and Senior students.  This survey is conducted through the Frost Center via email.  There are some great prizes for taking this one so if you are a First Year or Senior student, look for the email subject line Hope College Students: Share your experience with academic research. This survey runs through April 15.

Research Practices Survey March 25 through April 25

The college is in the third year of administering a national survey on student research practices and information literacy skills. The Research Practices Survey will be administered to all first-year students and to seniors this spring. Email invitations will go out to students on March 20 and will be open until April 24.

Through this survey we hope to assess the following areas: information literacy skills and pre-college research experiences of first-year students; first-year students’ information literacy skills and research experience after one year of college and after four years of college; how students’ information literacy skills change over four years of college; and how our students compare with those of students at other institutions. Since 2004, the Higher Education Data Sharing Consortium (HEDS) has administered this survey to more than 30,000 undergraduates at over 60 colleges and universities.

The data from the survey will be used to inform us about where and how students experience research at Hope and how well we are preparing them to do college-level research. This data could be important to current conversations about writing in the disciplines, general education and the research experience at Hope.

While students can win an iPad mini or one of six $50.00 Amazon gift cards by participating in the survey, we know that faculty can make a big difference in student behavior. If you are currently teaching first-year and/or senior students, please take a moment to encourage them to complete this survey.

New York Times Digital Edition

The New York Times digital edition is available for all students and faculty at Hope College. To get access, Hope users will need to create individual logins at this NYTimes.com site  and must use their 1Hope credentials to create an account. Follow the instructions to claim your pass. A list of frequently asked questions is available at the bottom of this post.

NYT

The online version includes not only the same articles, text and images that appear in the print edition, but also an array of additional still images, videos, audio and data content. About the only thing not included in the digital version is the crossword puzzles. The content is enriched by inclusion of longitudinal data from syndicates and data sources such as Thomson Reuters. The subscription also includes free access through the NYTNow iPhone app.

The library is interested in how access to the New York Times might be used within the curriculum, something that the NYT has been interested in as well. Given our emphasis on becoming more globally engaged and increasing student gains in writing and critical thinking, how might the NYT be used creatively within the classroom? Ideas for incorporating the New York Times into nearly all disciplines can be found on the NYT Classroom Ideas website.

Our subscription to the NYT digital edition was brokered by the Center for Research Libraries. CRL and academic libraries have an interest in preservation of the NYT, which is currently only being archived by the New York Times itself. No other major news organization is investing in data journalism and data analytics to the same extent, suggesting that the online NYT will become an even greater resource for scholarly research in the future. The digital edition is highly searchable and allows users to search for content going back to 1851. In addition to keyword searching, users will have access to the TimesMachine, digital replicas of every issue of the Times published from 1851 to 1980. Users can browse page by page and see articles, photos and ads as they originally appeared in print.

Here are some answers to Frequently Asked Questions about access to content:

I already have a NYTimes.com digital subscription. What should I do?
NYTimes.com does not permit a double entitlement. If you have an existing paid NYTimes.com subscription, you are not eligible for an Academic Pass. You should continue to access the Times via your own subscription.

Should I cancel my existing digital subscription to make use of the site license access?
The New York Times Academic Site License has some restrictions that your personal subscription maynot have. Consider the options carefully before deciding one way or another.

What are the restrictions?
Site license access does not include the NYTimes.com tablet apps. At this time, access to articles from the date range 1923 to 1986 is limited is limited to 5 articles for the 364-day period.

Can I access the Times off-campus?
Yes, as long as you have registered using your campus domain .edu e-mail address and obtained your Academic Pass.

Can I access the Times from my mobile device?
There are mobile apps for iPhone/iPod Touch (IOS 5.0+), Android (OS 2.1+), and Windows (7.5 O.S.) phones; these are included as part of the Academic Pass. Mobile apps for tablets are not part of the  Academic Pass. However, you can access the NYTimes.com mobile site (mobile.nytimes.com) or Times Skimmer (nytimes.com/skimmer) using your smartphone or tablet running one of the above operating systems.

CANCELLATION AND REFUND POLICY FOR DIGITAL PRODUCTS
Cancellation and Refunds of Digital Subscriptions (For those who currently subscribe)
You can cancel your digital product at any time by calling Customer Care at (800) 591-9233. For international customers, please e-mail us at help@nytimes.com. Group Subscription billing cycles and terms of cancellations may differ and are governed by the terms set forth in the Group Subscription Purchase Order.

Monthly and 4-Week Subscription Billing (For those who currently subscribe)
When you cancel, you cancel only future charges associated with your subscription. You may notify us of your intent to cancel at any time, but the cancellation will become effective at the end of your current billing period.

Cancellations are effective the following billing cycle. You will not receive a refund for the current billing cycle. You will continue to have the same access and benefits of your product for the remainder of the current billing period.

Annual Subscription Billing (For those who currently subscribe)
If you cancel within the first 11 months, your access and other benefits will end immediately and you will receive a refund prorated to the day.

If you cancel in the final 30 days, the cancellation will not take effect until the end of your current billing period. Your access and privileges will continue to the end of the current billing period, and you will not receive a refund.

How can I solve a problem accessing an NYTimes.com Academic Pass?

New York Times Digital Edition Now Available!

NYT

Access to the New York Times digital edition is now available for all students and faculty at Hope College. The New York Times, published since 1851, is the largest metropolitan newspaper in the United States. The online version includes not only the same articles, text and images that appear in the print edition, but also an array of additional still images, videos, audio and data content. About the only thing not included in the digital version is the crossword puzzles. The content is enriched by inclusion of longitudinal data from syndicates and data sources such as Thomson Reuters. The subscription also includes free access through the NYTNow iPhone app.

The library is interested in how access to the New York Times might be used within the curriculum, something that the NYT has been interested in as well. Given our emphasis on becoming more globally engaged and increasing student gains in writing and critical thinking, how might the NYT be used creatively within the classroom? Ideas for incorporating the New York Times into nearly all disciplines can be found on the NYT Classroom Ideas website.

Our subscription to the NYT digital edition was brokered by the Center for Research Libraries. CRL and academic libraries have an interest in preservation of the NYT, which is currently only being archived by the New York Times itself. No other major news organization is investing in data journalism and data analytics to the same extent, suggesting that the online NYT will become an even greater resource for scholarly research in the future. The digital edition is highly searchable and allows users to search for content going back to 1851. In addition to keyword searching, users will have access to the TimesMachine, digital replicas of every issue of the Times published from 1851 to 1980. Users can browse page by page and see articles, photos and ads as they originally appeared in print.

To get access, Hope users will need to create individual logins at the NYTimes.com site  and must use their 1Hope credentials to create an account. Follow the instructions to claim your pass.

Here are some answers to Frequently Asked Questions about access to content:

I already have a NYTimes.com digital subscription. What should I do?
NYTimes.com does not permit a double entitlement. If you have an existing paid NYTimes.com subscription, you are not eligible for an Academic Pass. You should continue to access the Times via your own subscription.

Should I cancel my existing digital subscription to make use of the site license access?
The New York Times Academic Site License has some restrictions that your personal subscription maynot have. Consider the options carefully before deciding one way or another.

What are the restrictions?
Site license access does not include the NYTimes.com tablet apps. At this time, access to articles from the date range 1923 to 1986 is limited is limited to 5 articles for the 364-day period.

Can I access the Times off-campus?
Yes, as long as you have registered using your campus domain .edu e-mail address and obtained your Academic Pass.

Can I access the Times from my mobile device?
There are mobile apps for iPhone/iPod Touch (IOS 5.0+), Android (OS 2.1+), and Windows (7.5 O.S.) phones; these are included as part of the Academic Pass. Mobile apps for tablets are not part of the  Academic Pass. However, you can access the NYTimes.com mobile site (mobile.nytimes.com) or Times Skimmer (nytimes.com/skimmer) using your smartphone or tablet running one of the above operating systems.

CANCELLATION AND REFUND POLICY FOR DIGITAL PRODUCTS
Cancellation and Refunds of Digital Subscriptions (For those who currently subscribe)
You can cancel your digital product at any time by calling Customer Care at (800) 591-9233. For international customers, please e-mail us at help@nytimes.com. Group Subscription billing cycles and terms of cancellations may differ and are governed by the terms set forth in the Group Subscription Purchase Order.

Monthly and 4-Week Subscription Billing (For those who currently subscribe)
When you cancel, you cancel only future charges associated with your subscription. You may notify us of your intent to cancel at any time, but the cancellation will become effective at the end of your current billing period.

Cancellations are effective the following billing cycle. You will not receive a refund for the current billing cycle. You will continue to have the same access and benefits of your product for the remainder of the current billing period.

Annual Subscription Billing (For those who currently subscribe)
If you cancel within the first 11 months, your access and other benefits will end immediately and you will receive a refund prorated to the day.

If you cancel in the final 30 days, the cancellation will not take effect until the end of your current billing period. Your access and privileges will continue to the end of the current billing period, and you will not receive a refund.

How can I solve a problem accessing an NYTimes.com Academic Pass?