A film for the mystery connoisseur

Nothing pulls at me like a good mystery.

You can easily catch me binge watching “Criminal Minds,” googling the facts behind the latest “Dateline NBC” or staying up all night reading the latest thriller, which is why I’m looking forward to the last film in our fall film series, The Unknown Girl.

The Belgian-French drama follows Jenny (Adele Haenel), a young doctor who leaves the clinic door unanswered, only to find out that the African woman found dead shortly after was the one ringing the bell. Driven by guilt and redemption, Jenny sets out to find out who the woman is and see to it that she is not forgotten.

Are you not intrigued? I sure hope so, because, in my humble, suspense-loving opinion, The Unknown Girl possesses at least three characteristics that make for a quality mystery.

It’s attention-grabbing. Great thrillers make it impossible to walk away right from the get-go. Fellow bookworms, it’s those books that invoke a high page-turning pace and healthy dose of obsession to know what happens next. In this case, the Dardenne brothers keep at their gripping undercurrents, begging audience members to go along on Jenny’s journey to find out who this woman is, what happened to her and why she was ringing the clinic’s bell in the first place.

There’s a stellar plot twist. I’m bothered when I figure things out early on and there are no “OMG!” moments. Please, throw me for a loop; give me a dose of humility when I think I know what comes next. Sure, we don’t know the plot twist in this film yet, but the preview alone begs for one. You have a doctor who, moments before the bell rings, tells her intern that “a doctor has to control his emotions,” and yet, days later, she’s making house calls, wondering into places she’d never dreamed of before, her emotions deeply driving her quest for the truth. That’s a solid start in my plot twist requirements.

You forget Adèle Haenel is acting. She’s too busy seeing the world as Jenny would.

You get a sense of purpose and closure. Not just as the viewer-turned investigator, but you want to see the characters reach a closing point. At the heart of this film is a dilemma for even the most dedicated do-gooder – at what point do you pull back to keep yourself from falling too deep? You see Jenny take on different hats to give this girl a voice, consumed by the thought she is to blame. You can only hope to see a closure to that. Plus, you’ll see the directors’ belief in humanity’s freedom to choose to do good, even as outside pressures say otherwise.

Ultimately, I want to be part of a mystery that stays with me even after it’s long done. Something that pulls at my heart and mind, which is something we hope to give you with all the Knick films we show. Something I’m confident The Unknown Girl has to offer.

The Unknown Girl is showing on Monday – Saturday, Nov. 6-11 at 7:30 p.m. Check out the trailer.

Tickets are $7 for regular admission and $6 for senior citizens, Hope College faculty/staff and children. Tickets will be sold at the door but are also available in advance at the Events and Conferences Office located downtown in the Anderson-Werkman Financial Center (100 E. Eighth St.). The office is open weekdays from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and can be reached at (616) 395-7890.

The Knickerbocker Theatre is located downtown Holland at 86 E. Eighth St.

Odille Parker
Hope College Events and Conferences Manager

Our 2017 Fall Film Series

Fall brings colors to the leaves, a chill in the air, and films to the Knick! Yes, the fall film series is off and running.

The Knickerbocker Theatre at Hope College is showing four films through November 11.

Maudi posterThe series opens with Maudie, an Irish-Canadian biographical romantic drama, through Saturday, Sept. 16. In Nova Scotia, Maud Lewis (Sally Hawkins), who suffers from severe arthritis, is hired as a housekeeper by reclusive local fish peddler Everett Lewis (Ethan Hawke). Despite her crippled hands, Maud yearns to be independent and to live away from her overprotective family, but most of all she wants to create art. An unlikely romance blossoms between Maude and Everett as she hones her skills despite her pain and overcomes the physical challenge of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. Eventually, she rises to become one of Canada’s premier folk artists, with paintings hanging in the White House. The film is in English. It has a running time of one hour and 55 minutes and is rated PG-13.

Past Life posterThe series will feature Past Life on Monday-Saturday, Sept. 18-23. The drama/thriller depicts the pilgrimage of two sisters — Sephi Milch (Joy Rieger), an introverted talented classical musician, and Nana (Nelly Tagar), a boisterous journalist — in the late 1970s as they unwind the shocking revelation of their father’s past during the Holocaust. Meanwhile, Selphi not only must struggle with the unraveling of her family history and its possible consequences but also must compete in a male-dominated profession as she seeks to be a classical composer. The film is in English, German, Hebrew and Polish with English subtitles. It has a running time of one hour and 49 minutes and is not rated.

The series will continue with The Trip to Spain on Monday-Saturday, Oct. 9-14. The comedy depicts the many changes and challenges faced in middle age. British comedians Rob Brydon and Steve Coogan once again come onto the big screen, touring their way through a variety of European cities during a week-long drive filled with sightseeing and taste-bud adventures leading them to epiphanies regarding history, fame, and fatherhood. This film is in English. It has a running time of one hour and 48 minutes and is not rated.

The series will end with The Unknown Girl on Monday-Saturday, Nov. 6-11. The Belgian-French drama is a searing saga of guilt and redemption. Young doctor Jenny (Adele Haenel) leaves the clinic door unanswered, and shortly after a young African woman is found dead by the side of the road. Consumed with guilt, Jenny embarks on a journey to discover who the woman was and to see to it that she is remembered. “The Unknown Girl” is both a gripping mystery and a profoundly human moral tale encompassing “no end of guilt, and just enough grace,” as said by the New York Times. The film is in French with subtitles. It has a running time of one hour and 53 minutes and is not rated.

Tickets for the individual films are $7 for regular admission and $6 for senior citizens, Hope College faculty and children. Tickets will be sold at the door but are also available in advance at the Events and Conferences Office located downtown in the Anderson-Werkman Financial Center (100 E. Eighth St.). The office is open weekdays from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and can be reached at (616) 395-7890.

The Knickerbocker Theatre is located in downtown Holland at 86 E. Eighth St.