Living Sustainably: A Week’s Worth of Things to Do for Earth Day

Living Sustainabily:  A Week’s Worth of Things to Do for Earth Day

By Abagail Jeavons and Michelle Gibbs

Since the first Earth Day was celebrated on April 22, 1970, Earth Day has become an international movement with events worldwide demonstrating support for environmental protection. “The wealth of the nation is its air, water, soil, forests, minerals, rivers, lakes, oceans, scenic beauty, wildlife habitats and biodiversity… that’s all there is,” said Gaylord Nelson, a U.S. senator from Wisconsin, who founded the day.

“That’s the whole economy. That’s where all the economic activity and jobs come from. These biological systems are the sustaining wealth of the world.”

The Holland area offers a full week of Earth Day-oriented themes and events, beginning Monday, April 17. But any day can be an Earth Day, as seen by about 50 Hope College students who recently participated in a beach clean-up.

Doing things like cleaning up our local beach is so important because it lets us take ownership over our community and deliberately shape it into the kind of community in which we want to live,” said one of the students, Olivia Witta. “Little things like this are the things that ultimately make the world better.

Here is an Earth Week list of things to join in or think about in the Holland area:

Non-Motor Monday

 Explore an alternative commuting option such as walking, biking, or carpooling.

 Bike Holland! is a casual, social bike ride around downtown to learn locations of the new bike lanes.  The ride will roll out from Centennial Park at 7 p.m. and will last roughly 45 minutes. All types of cyclists and bikes welcome. Helmets required. (These rides will take place every third Monday of the month from April through August.)

Tap Water Tuesday

 “Take back the Tap” by opting to use a reusable water bottle and fill it from the faucet or fountain.  Often, people drink bottled water out of convenience or because they think it tastes better, but in blind taste tests, participants often prefer the tap.  Plus, drinking tap water is better for the environment and your wallet.

 Sandy Hansen, a local artist, will present her eco-art and highlight the important and impactful conversation between art and the environment.  Hope College, Martha Miller Center, first floor Rotunda at 3 p.m.

 “What’s Invading My Habitat?” will be Living Sustainably Along the Lakeshore’s final event of the spring. Herrick District Library, 6:30 p.m.

Waste Wednesday

 Rarely, do we think about where things go when we throw them “away.”  Reduce, Reuse, Repurpose, Recycle! And don’t forget to compost food waste.  For more information about what can be recycled rather than sent to the landfill in the city of Holland, visit www.cityofholland.com/solidwasteandrecycling.  GreenMichigan.org is also a great resource about items you typically wouldn’t think to be recyclable.

Threads Thursday

 Learn about the impacts the clothes we purchase have socially and environmentall’y with a discussion led by staff from the Bridge and watch clips from the film “True Cost; in the Schaap Science Center, 35 E. 12th St., Room 1019.  7 to 9 p.m.

 “Women in Nature” will be hosted by the Outdoor Discovery Center at 6 p.m.  This series is designed to motivate women to be more healthy, active and passionate about the natural world.  To register visit:  outdoordiscovery.org/events/women-nature- nature-photography/

Food Friday

 Did you know the food we eat has a huge impact on the environment?  Try products that are organic, local and meatless.

 A children’s event at the North Side Herrick Library, 155 Riley St., will let the kids make their own recycled bird feeders, along with two other earth-friendly make-and- take crafts. Participants will be entered in a drawing for a $50 Jonkers Garden Center gift card.

Earth Day Saturday  

 Turn off electronics, unplug and get outdoors!  Ideas include studying outside, visiting a park or getting some family and friends together to pick up trash or plant a tree.

For additional details about these and other activities, visit the Community Sustainability Calendar under Events at www.hope.edu/sustainability-institute/. For more information about the international Earth Day, visit:  https://www.epa.gov/history/epa-history- earth-day.

 Abagail Jeavons is a Hope College junior and co-president of Hope Advocates for Sustainability. Michelle Gibbs is director of the Holland-Hope College Sustainability Institute.

Photos:

BEACH CLEAN.JPG Hope College students and the group Hope Advocates for Sustainability recently cleared trash from Lake Michigan beaches.

Courtesy photo BIKING2.JPG Alternative commuting options, including bike riding, are a great way to celebrate Earth Week and start being more sustainable. Courtesy photo: Rob Walcott at www.pcketphotographr.com and Velo City Cycles.

This Week’s Sustainability Framework Theme :  Environmental Awareness/Action: Environmental education and integrating environmental practices into our planning will change negative outcomes of the past and improve our future.

 

ABOUT THIS SERIES

Living Sustainably is a collection of community voices sharing updates about local sustainability initiatives. It is presented by the Holland-Hope College Sustainability Institute, a joint project of Hope College, the City of Holland, and Holland Board of Public Works. Go to www.hope.edu/sustainability-institute for more information

Living Sustainably: Six things to know about the coziest garden in Holland

LIVING SUSTAINABLY:  Six things to know about the coziest garden in Holland

By Savannah Weaver, Community Garden Director

Hollanders know that Windmill Island Gardens is home to extensive spring tulip displays and America’s only working antique Dutch windmill. However, fewer may be aware that since 2016, we’ve been putting our own unique spin on the community garden – a chance for anyone in the community to learn about and grow their own fresh vegetables.

Growing our own vegetables is a significantly sustainable practice. It gets our hands in the soil and connects us with Earth. Community gardens make efficient use of space, provide access to a low-cost, sustainably-produced source of healthy food, and decrease reliance on commercially-grown produce that might have a large carbon footprint and could be sending money out of the community.

Here are six things to know about Holland’s own community garden:

1. We’re beginner-friendly. Although experienced gardeners are welcome, our program is designed to teach newcomers all they need to know to grow their own vegetables. Anyone with a plot in the garden also gets access to biweekly garden skills classes. Classes cover basics like fertilizing and controlling pests, as well as garden-adjacent topics such as preserving and cooking with vegetables. The first class is April 29.

2. We put the “community” in “community garden.” The name of the garden, de Gezellige Tuin, is Dutch for “the cozy garden” – a name that represents the warm and welcoming community we aim to establish. Participants are encouraged to share everything from tips and ideas to extra seeds and produce with the garden neighbors they’ll get to know quite well after a summer of classes and other events. Additionally, Windmill Island staff is frequently on hand to give advice and answer gardening questions.

3. We’re affordable. The cost of supplies can often seem daunting to would-be gardeners. De Gezellige Tuin removes this barrier by providing community tools and equipment. We also offer our participants free starter plants and seeds of some of the most popular vegetables to grow in our region. The fee for participation is only $30, with financial assistance available to those in need.

4. Location, location, location. Windmill Island’s famous tulip fields look stunning in the spring but used to lay fallow after the tulips finished blooming. Now our community garden makes use of that otherwise unused space. The result? An efficient use of land, and a vegetable garden with fertile, well-maintained soil flanked by beautiful landscapes and the iconic de Zwaan Windmill.

5. We’re all in this together. De Gezellige Tuin is supported by local businesses such as Van Wieren Hardware and Wolverine Tools, which have donated equipment, and De Bruyn Seed Co., which supplies starter seeds. We give back to the community as well, by donating the harvest from a staff-tended demonstration plot to the Community Action House’s food pantry and partnering with the Boys & Girls Club of Greater Holland to give high school Club members an opportunity to learn gardening skills.

6. Space is limited; sign up now. Just 36 garden plots are available, and the first class is April 29, so sign up soon. To learn more about de Gezellige Tuin or apply for a plot for the 2017 season, email Savannah Weaver at greenhouse@cityofholland.com, or call (616) 355-1032.

 Savannah Weaver is director of the de Gezellige Tuin community garden program.

IMAGES: Courtesy of Savannah Weaver.
This Week’s Sustainability Framework Theme

Quality of Life: The community, through governmental, religious, business and social organizations, makes decisions that contribute to its own well-being.

 

ABOUT THIS SERIES

Living Sustainably is a collection of community voices sharing updates about local sustainability initiatives. It is presented by the Holland-Hope College Sustainability Institute, a joint project of Hope College, the City of Holland, and Holland Board of Public Works. Go to www.hope.edu/sustainability-institute for more information.

March 2017 Sustainability News

In the News:

March 31, 2017 – Kids send global warming postcards to Trump

March 31, 2017 – What the cluck? Author discusses the basics to raising backyard chickens

March 31, 2017 – Backyard chickens: Program allows residents to produce local food

March 31, 2017 – Consumers Energy to provide LED lightbulbs through food banks  www.consumersenergy.com/lighting

March 30, 2017 – Franciscan friar sees climate as a moral issue

March 30, 2017 – House Michigan Department of Environmental Quality (MDEQ) budget passes over Democratic objections

March 30, 2017 – Saugatuck conservationists speak out over dunes development

March 30, 2017 – Saugatuck commits to becoming part of national water trail

March 30, 2017 – See a bald eagle

March 30, 2017 – Visitor center plans taking shape at Holland Energy Park

March 30, 2017 – How to Lower Your Energy Bill

March 29, 2017 – Letter: Make climate solutions a priority

March 29, 2017 – Ottawa County ranked first in health outcomes

March 29, 2017 – Muralist paints images on melting icebergs

March 28, 2017 – Bike share planning in Holland put on hold to look for funding

March 28, 2017 – Trump signs order at the EPA to dismantle environmental protections

March 28, 2017 – Trump tosses Obama’s ‘clean’ energy plan, embraces coal

March 28, 2017 – Natural ways to keep roses radiant this season

March 27, 2017 – Living Sustainably: 5 good reasons to borrow a home energy monitoring kit

March 27, 2017 – Doctor: To fight asthma, fight global warming

March 24, 2014 – Trump EPA cuts could hobble Michigan pollution monitoring, cleanup

March 24, 2017 – Trump administration approves Keystone XL pipeline

March 23, 2017 – Smart Water, Wastewater Management Drives Down Costs, Reduces Loss

March 23, 2017 – Will Consumers Pay More for Recycled Ocean Plastic?

March 22, 2017 – My Take: Climate change is real, impacts worsening, bipartisan solutions exist

March 22, 2017 – Tips for choosing an energy-efficient, eco-friendly HVAC system

March 22, 2017 – Ford Water-Saving Technologies Reduced Usage by 13 Million Gallons

March 22, 2017 – Often ‘overlooked’ melting influence of dark snow:  New monthly video explores critical role of soot and algal blooms in accelerating Greenland ice sheet melting rates.

March 22, 2017 – Company turns piped water into electricity:  Turbines installed inside water pipes generate electricity.

March 21, 2017 – 3 upgrades to help boost your home’s energy efficiency

March 21, 2017 – NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC SOCIETY GRANT SUPPORTS RESEARCH IN EUROPE

March 17, 2017 – EPA Awards $100 Million to Michigan for Flint Water Infrastructure Upgrades

March 15, 2017 – Letter: Scientific consensus is stronger than ever

March 12, 2017 – Michael E. Kraft: World needs America’s climate leadership

March 10, 2017 – Huizenga testifies before Congress on Great Lakes economy

March 10, 2017 – Van Raalte Farm to host Maple Sugar Time in Holland

March 10, 2017 – Coho salmon activity picks up on Lake Michigan

March 9, 2017 – Letter: Huizenga runs into environmental conflicts

March 9, 2017 – Spring cleaning: Area parks being readied for peak season

March 9, 2017 – Smart food swaps mean more nutrition and less ‘giving up’

March 8, 2017 – 14-year-old scientist aims to solve the energy crisis

March 7, 2017 – Recycling Rates Are Rising for Plastic Bags and Wrap

March 7, 2017 – Biodegradable Breakthrough: How a Small Business Is Improving Plastics

March 7, 2017 – Companies Save $14 for Every $1 Invested in Reducing Food Waste

March 6, 2017 – Living Sustainably: 10 ways to live a more nature-rich life

March 4, 2017 – My Take: Ignoring evidence of climate change

March 2, 2017 – Summits to address West Michigan housing industry issues

March 1, 2017 – MACC approves healthy watershed partnership

Living Sustainably: Hope Student Finding Sustainability in an Iceland Eco-village

LIVING SUSTAINABLY:  Finding Sustainability in an Iceland Eco-village

By Alex Webb, Hope College student

During the fall semester of 2016, I traveled to Iceland through a study abroad program that revolved teaching “Sustainability Through Community,” a concept I was not aware of before this three-month excursion. This idea was one in which I found the most practical solutions to sustainable living in the modern-day world.

DCIM100GOPROGOPR2387.

While I studied in Iceland, I lived in an eco-village with four other students, our professor and 100 Icelandic residents and workers. The other students and I spent most of our days learning about concrete ways to reduce our carbon footprints and transform our lives to become completely sustainable. We also worked in the greenhouses, kitchens and workshops with the residents to help make products for the village to sell.

It was not long before I realized that this study abroad experience was less about touring a remote and exotic country, but more about learning how the concept of sustainability does not survive without a cohesive and synergistic community. I learned how a group of people lives sustainably with their environment and each other.

Iceland is praised for being one of the greenest countries in the world. What does this mean?

Renewable energy resources, like hydroelectric power and geothermal reserves, provide 100 percent of their electricity and heating. This makes it more convenient for them to be a sustainable population.

Icelanders use this advantage to play an active role in sustainable development and commitment to the environment. Their environmental awareness is largely shaped by close community ties, a strong sense of tradition and a unique bond with nature.

Through learning about another culture’s environmentally conscious traditions, I was able to gain a new perspective on the applicability of sustainability in our day-to- day lives back home. By the end of the program, Viking Stouts and homemade candles were not the only gifts I was bringing back to the states. I also brought home three valuable lessons from my time in Iceland that I would like to share with you.

1) This concept of becoming more sustainable can be overwhelming. However, it starts with each person becoming more self-sustainable in his or her daily activities. For example, try walking with a friend instead of driving to your destination. Experiment with growing your own food. You may even be able to compost your food waste and use it as fertilizer! Try your hand at making your own shampoo or soap. You’d be surprised how much money you can save.

2) Reduce, reuse, recycle. Reduce your consumption of unnecessary clothing or food. Reuse what you can and don’t be afraid to get creative. Recycle what you can. This simple effort minimizes waste products in landfills.

3) Your life can make a big difference in the world. Whether your concerns are local or global, don’t be afraid to speak up for what you think is right. I realize that not everyone is going to become an environmental activist and go out to buy a Prius after they read this article. The most important point I want you to take away is to keep an open mind when listening to someone with a different perspective.

Regardless of your race, religion or socioeconomic status, respect your neighbor because when we work together, our words and ideas can change the world. Community is a cornerstone on which sustainability is built.

 Alex Webb is a senior studying sociology and environmental studies at Hope College. After graduation, she’s interested in pursuing a career in business and sustainability.

PHOTOS:

Alex in Iceland jpg: Hope student Alex Webb experienced sustainable community in the unique country of Iceland.

Ecovillage greenhouse tomatoes.jpg : Sustainability in the ecovillage includes growing tomatoes in a greenhouse.

This Week’s Sustainability Framework Theme:  Quality of Life: The community, through governmental, religious, business and social organizations, makes decisions that contribute to its own well-being.

 

ABOUT THIS SERIES

Living Sustainably is a collection of community voices sharing updates about local sustainability initiatives. It is presented by the Holland-Hope College Sustainability Institute, a joint project of Hope College, the City of Holland, and Holland Board of Public Works. Go to www.hope.edu/sustainability-institute for more information

Living Sustainably: 10 Ways to Live a More Nature-Rich Life

Living Sustainably:  10 Ways to Live a More Nature-Rich Life

By Jane Naber and Hamilton STREAM school students

 

Being nature rich is more than going green; it’s about going outside regularly and finding value in doing any activity in nature.  It means letting a connection to nature enrich you, your family, and your community. Consider these ways to live a more nature-rich life, with references to learn more.

 

  1.  Take a walk outside.

Why?  Walking outside can help you lose weight, keep you healthy, and reduce stress (Better Policies for a Healthier America, September, 2016).

 

  1.  Encourage the creation of green spaces for learning and exploration.

Why?  Cathy James states, “Anything you can teach in an indoor classroom can be taught outdoors, often in ways that are more enjoyable to children” (James, Cathy, The Garden Classroom, 2015).  Recent studies show that children thrive when given the opportunity to learn outside (The Pathfinder School.org)    

 

  1.  Get your employees outside!

WHY? Lisa Evans of Entrepreneur in “Why You Should Take Your Work Outside” states, “Trapping ourselves indoors has created what health experts call a ‘nature deficit disorder’. Depression or anxiety result from too little time spent outside.”

 

  1. Know your resources

Why? The Outdoor Discovery Center provides many classes for learning outside such as “Up Close and Wild,” “Wondrous World of Water,” and “Live Birds of Prey.” outdoordiscovery.org

 

  1.  Take your family to the park

WHY?  New research suggests that families who regularly get outside together tend to function better. (Rick Nauert in “Outdoor Functions Can Improve Family Bonding,” 2016).

https://psychcentral.com/news/2016/06/21/outdoor-functions-can-improve-family-bonding/105089.html

 

  1. Be energy efficient –use renewable resources

WHY?  The use of fossil fuel is unsustainable.  At the current rate, oil will run out in 53 years, natural gas in 54, and coal in 110. (Siddharth Singh, “How Long Will Fossil Fuels Last?” 2015)

http://www.business-standard.com/article/punditry/how-long-will-fossil-fuels-last-115092201397_1.html

 

  1.  Plant a tree

Why?  Trees improve the community by keeping it cool (it can be 31 degrees cooler in the shade) and absorbing pollutants. This can aid in lowering air conditioning costs. (ProjectEvergreen.org)

 

  1.  Explore the woods safely

Why?  There are some things out there that can hurt you or ruin your day…but if you are properly prepared you will be ready for any adverse weather, critters, or other challenges that you may encounter.”  (rogerfulton.com)

 

  1.  Plant a Garden

Why?  You will save about two pounds of carbon from entering the atmosphere for each pound of produce you grow for your family.  (Green and Healthy Homes.org)

  1. Value Nature

Why?  “To sit in solitude, to think in solitude with only the music of the stream and the cedar, to break the flow of silence, there lies the value of wilderness.” – John Muir

 

 

STREAM School is a cross-curricular program at Hamilton Community Schools where students also learn everyday skills while connecting their learning to the outdoors.  Recently, 120 middle schoolers presented “Art and Animals” at the Outdoor Discovery Center where 20 ideas were shared through art to encourage Holland residents to be nature-rich.

PHOTOS:

CUTLINE for Nature rich1.jpg, Naturerich2.jpg:   Some 120 middle schoolers recently presented “Art and Animals” at the Outdoor Discovery Center where 20 ideas were shared through art to encourage Holland residents to be nature-rich.   

ABOUT THIS SERIES  

Living Sustainably is a collection of community voices sharing updates about local sustainability initiatives. It is presented by the Holland-Hope College Sustainability Institute, a joint project of Hope College, the City of Holland, and Holland Board of Public Works. Go to www.hope.edu/sustainability-institute for more information.

 

This Week’s Sustainability Framework Theme

Environmental Awareness/Action: Environmental education and integrating environmental practices into our planning will change negative outcomes of the past and improve our future.

February 2017 Sustainability News

February 27, 2017 – HOPE COLLEGE STUDENT’S RESEARCH ADDS FUEL TO FAST-FOOD DEBATE: Margaret Dickinson, spent two years at Hope testing hundreds of fast-food wrappers from several states in order to detect per- and polyfluoro alkyl substances (PFAS) in the packaging. Human-made with long environmental lifetimes, PFAS is toxic to humans and animals, and its bioaccumulation is troubling to scientists.

February 26, 2017 – HOPE COLLEGE MERGING MAJORS: This summer, senior Elizabeth Ensink, participated in one of the United States’ most competitive undergraduate creative writing fellowships, “Nature in Words.” The 10-week fellowship, based at Hastings, Michigan’s Pierce Cedar Creek Institute for environmental education, provided a unique opportunity for Ensink to merge the diverse academic interests that she’s been able to pursue at a high level at Hope, where she is majoring in both biology and English with a writing emphasis.

February 22, 2017 – My Take: The US values innovation — that’s why we need the EPA

February 21, 2017 – Holland: Becoming a more age-friendly community: forum discusses possibilities

February 21, 2017 – These 8 retailers are closing in Michigan in 2017 (so far) – plus 4 that are opening

February 20, 2017 – Living Sustainably:  Pop Quiz: Do you know your home place?

February 20, 2017 – GOING COAST TO COAST  Brian Kieft Hope College ’01 returned to the shores of Michigan from Monterey Bay Aquatic Research Institute to study water quality in the Great Lakes using an autonomous underwater submersible called Tethys.

February 20, 2017 – Nonprofit produces Women & the Environment Symposium

February 20, 2017 – Local First updates ‘impact’ assessment tool

February 18, 2017 – Herman Miller committed to environmental safety with honey bee program

February 18, 2017 – Ottawa County Patriots to host forum on climate issues

February 17, 2017 – New ‘dashboard’ will display West Michigan’s flaws and bright spots

February 17, 2017 – Global Pressures to Fix Climate Change Push Demand for Air Quality Control Systems

February 17, 2017 – Pruitt OK’d as EPA chief over environmentalists’ objections

February 17, 2017 – Teens May Go Hungry as Poorest Families Struggle to Feed Kids (Parents skip meals so children can eat, but youngest siblings get priority if there’s not enough food).     En Español

February 17, 2017 – LEED-Certified Venues Increase Savings, Decrease Operating Costs, Study Says

February 17, 2017 – Campus Carbon Emissions Drop, But May Be Under-Reported by 30%

February 17, 2017 – It takes a village

February 16, 2017 – Sustainability is Alive and Well – and Moving Forward

February 16, 2017 – Endangered Species Act Runs Headfirst into Mining Companies

February 16, 2017 – How Michigan is meeting the increasing demand for locally grown food

February 16, 2017 – My Take: Who needs the EPA? We do

February 16, 2017 – Holland Civic Center project costs $256K under budget so far

February 16, 2017 – How Digitalization Is Revolutionizing the Waste & Recycling Industry

February 16, 2017 – Here are Holland city council’s goals for the next fiscal year

February 16, 2017 – Trump Expected to Sign Executive Orders Curbing EPA’s Climate Cause

February 14, 2017 – West Michigan receiving $19.9M for nature projects

February 13, 2017 – Living Sustainably: Know your landscape for environmental engagement

February 13, 2017 – Walmart’s ‘Very Strong Business Case’ for Cutting Emissions

February 11, 2017 – Environmentalism is too widely misunderstood

February 10, 2017 – Become a master naturalist through MSU series

February 10, 2017 – House Committee Will Hear Ways to ‘Improve’ the Clean Air Act

February 9, 2017 – Project Clarity completes 6 Holland-area watershed projects

February 9, 2017 – State: Innovation needed to stop Asian carp

February 9, 2017 – Levi’s Is Radically Redefining Sustainability

February 7, 2017 – Letter: Holland Energy Park a terrific addition

February 8, 2017 – ‘Living street’ project in Zeeland moving forward

February 7, 2017 – Zeeland school benefits from early literacy donation

February 6, 2017 – HOPE COLLEGE’S JACK H. MILLER CENTER FOR MUSICAL ARTS EARNS LEED SILVER CERTIFICATION

February 6, 2017 – Living Sustainably: Working on Lake Mac’s reputation

February 6, 2017 – Shareholders to Amazon, McDonald’s, Target, Walmart: Phase Out Polystyrene Foam

February 5, 2017 – Powering Holland: Construction of new power plant nears completion

February 4, 2017 – New online tool gives current E. coli data

February 3, 2017 – ‘Greenwashing’ Costing Walmart $1 Million

February 3, 2017 – Local company delivering fresh groceries to your door

February 2, 2017 – ‘Orange bikes’: Group brainstorms how to bring bike sharing program to Holland

February 1, 2017 – Social Justice Awards and “I Have a Dream” Essay Winners

January 2017 Sustainability News

January 30, 2017 – Living Sustainably: We can see more stars in Holland

January 30, 2017 – Why 98% of Companies Do Not Achieve Their Sustainability Goals

January 30, 2017 – BP Advocates for Putting a Price on Carbon

January 30, 2017 – How to Reduce Corporate Food Waste? There’s an Online Hub for That

January 27, 2017 – Affordable housing, LGBT ordinance among goals discussed by Holland city council

January 23, 2017 – “GREAT DECISIONS” SERIES TO ADDRESS TOPICS OF GLOBAL IMPORTANCE

January 23, 2017 – Kids’ Food Basket adds Jefferson K-7 to Sack Supper program

January 23, 2017 – EV Charging Stations Increasingly Common

January 23, 2017 – Leaks: Trump Budget to Demolish DOE Programs

January 23, 2017 – Perry Signals Support for Energy Codes

January 22, 2017 – Living Sustainably: Cultivating a sustainable community

January 18, 2017 – EPA pick disagrees with Trump, says climate change isn’t hoax

January 18, 2017 – North Ottawa Dunes land swap finalized

January 17, 2017 – Consumers will pay more money for “sustainable” products

January 17, 2017 – Herman Miller receives WorldatWork 2017 Seal of Distinction

January 17, 2017 – Groups to begin making social justice changes in Holland

January 16, 2017 – Need identified for affordable housing in Ottawa County

January 15, 2017 – Ottawa, Allegan receive grant to battle invasive species

January 12, 2017 – Home Help: 5 tips to keep your home warm, cozy and protected this winter

January 11, 2017 – This bumble bee was everywhere. Now it’s on the endangered species list.

January 11, 2017 – Holland’s South Shore Drive to see on-street bike lanes

January 10, 2017 – Dale Wyngarden: Bike lanes need to adhere to standards

January 6, 2017 – How one company eliminated food waste: The ‘landfill can no longer be an option.’

January 6, 2017 – Cyclists gather to ride, eat, drink together at Sunday’s Frigid Frondo

January 5, 2017 – GVSU’s Sustainability Impact Totals $250 Million

January 4, 2017 – As from 1 January 2017 100% of Dutch trains are powered by wind energy.  The Dutch railways company NS is the world’s first railway company that gets 100% of its energy from wind turbines.

January 3, 2017 – Allegan, Ottawa United Way partnership brings regional service

January 3, 2017 – Holland Sentinel Guest Editorial: Think inside the box: Shipping donated items to Goodwill made simple

January 3, 2017 – Gardening trends for 2017

January 1, 2017 – 2016 Holland Annual Report  What a year it was! Expanded snowmelt, LED lights, Home Energy Retrofit Program, Record High Voter Registrations and much more. Take a look inside Holland’s 2016 Annual Report.

Involving All of Us in So Many Ways

LIVING SUSTAINABLY:

Involving All of Us in So Many Ways

By Michelle Gibbs
Director, Holland-Hope College Sustainability Institute

Welcome to the new Living Sustainably series!

This weekly column is sponsored by the Holland-Hope College Sustainability Institute as a way to keep our community informed and engaged in all of the great work in sustainability that is happening around the greater Holland area.  

You may be asking yourself, what really is “sustainability?”  The term sustainability has been defined in many ways, but the most commonly referenced definition comes from the Brundtland Commission’s Report Our Common Future which states “sustainable development is development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs.”  This weekly column is aimed at showing how issues of sustainability are actually at play in so many areas of our lives.  

Each week, guest authors will share information about events or work they are involved in as it relates to seven categories. These categories make up our “Sustainability Framework,” which demonstrates the many ways in which sustainability awareness can improve our community’s future. They are:  

  • Smart Energy 
  • Economic Development
  • Transportation
  • Community & Neighborhood
  • Quality of Life
  • Community Knowledge
  • Environmental Action & Awareness


Our City of Holland Sustainability Committee has created this seven-pillar Sustainability Framework with “lenses” to help us evaluate and make more sustainable choices. We are using this framework as a way to share information about our journey to become a more sustainable community. Each week’s column will look at an issue through one of these lenses.

The city’s vision statement says Holland is “a vibrant, world-class community in a beautiful lakefront environment where people work together, celebrate community, and realize dreams.” We believe for that to be true, we must look at all aspects of our community – including the economic, social, and environmental impacts we all have.  In doing that, we are working hard to ensure that Holland is a great place to live, work, and play for generations to come.

The Sustainability Institute is entering our third year of partnership between Hope College, the City of Holland, and Holland Board of Public Works. The purpose of the Institute is to support efforts to encourage, engage, educate, and drive sustainable culture in water and air quality, energy efficiency, land use, and environmental innovation.

Our vision is a healthy and economically vibrant community that promotes environmental stewardship and mutual respect for people and the planet.  Our mission is to foster collaborative efforts to infuse sustainability into the minds and practices of the greater Holland community.  

We invite anyone and everyone in the community to join in. Check out the new community sustainability dashboard at www.hollandsustainabilityreport.org to see dozens of metrics in all seven framework areas. You can also follow us on Facebook by liking the group “Living Sustainably Along the Lakeshore.”

 

We hope you will enjoy this new series and that it encourages you to join us on this journey to become a more sustainable community.  

ABOUT THIS SERIES  

Living Sustainably:  is a collection of community voices sharing updates about local sustainability initiatives. It is presented by the Holland-Hope College Sustainability Institute, a joint project of Hope College, the City of Holland, and Holland Board of Public Works. See more at hope.edu/sustainability-institute