Post-National Library Week FYI

by Kelly Jacobsma, Director

 

Libraries generally don’t publicly promote political agendas; however we feel that our users may want to know how politics in Washington and the President’s proposed budget may impact library services in Michigan and at Hope.  As you may know, President Trump has proposed eliminating all federal library funding – and the agency, the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS), that administers much of it – in his initial FY18 budget proposal.

 

Total elimination of IMLS as proposed in the President’s budget would have a devastating impact on library service across Michigan. For instance, the Library Services and Technology Act (LSTA) funds pay for all costs associated with MeLCat, the statewide resource sharing program that provides nearly one million loans to library patrons per year, as well as the majority of the Michigan eLibrary (MeL) 40 databases and eBook content. Both programs have become irreplaceable for libraries and schools of all types and sizes.

 

At Hope, we would not only lose MeLCat sharing, we would lose the Academic OneFile full-text database and many others. Academic OneFile is the most used database by Hope students.

 

During the FY18 appropriations lobbying season, the American Library Association asked Representatives to sign “Dear Appropriator” letters to the Appropriations Committee, asking them to preserve funding this year for the Library Services and Technology Act (LSTA) and the Innovative Approaches to Literacy (IAL) program. One-third of the entire House of Representatives (from both parties) signed “Dear Appropriator” letters and nearly 170 members signed at least one.  (Visit this House tracker to see whether your Representative in the House signed.) So far, none of our West Michigan Congressmen have signaled support. While there will surely be budget negotiations, we invite you to express your support for LSTA funding and the exceptional services these funds provide to Michigan communities. The value of being informed about the issue is that it allows you to take a stand. You can make your voice heard by posting a comment on the blog, writing an opinion piece in a newspaper, or writing a thoughtful letter to your legislators in Washington. As always, remember that at Hope we practice the Virtues of Public Discourse as we express our views with those who may not agree with us.

 

The entire budget is online at America First: A Budget Blueprint to Make America Great Again. For more information and actions that you can take to save library funding nationally and in Michigan, visit the American Library Association’s Government Relations and Advocacy page.

 

Project time! How Can the Library Help You?

It’s Spring, which means it is ‘Project Time’ on the 2nd floor of the Library! The Media Services Desk is the go-to place to check out a GoPro camera, Chromebook, or an iPad. You can also purchase paper or simple office supplies.  Use the Ellison die cut or spiral binding machine or have an item laminated.  If you are creating a poster for the Celebration for Undergraduate Research and Creative Performance, you will pick up your poster at the Media Desk. We also have supplies for trimming and mounting your poster on a trifold board.

Do you have a final project and need a little help with digitization, formatting or finalizing? Come to the TechLab for assistance and access to scanning, color printing, and expanded software. Trained students are available for assistance whenever the Library is open.  You can get help with editing a video, creating a Google site or Prezi, formatting a research poster, or creating a screencast.

Lower your academic stress by planning ahead, starting early, and getting great help in the Library! Also, remember to sleep well, slow down and breathe!

Graphic Novels at the Library

Graphic novels aren’t just about superheroes anymore. They comment on culture, politics, relationships, historical events and much more.  We have a fantastic LibGuide by our Metadata and Digital Collections Librarian, Jeremy Barney which really highlights our collection.  You can find many of our graphic novels in the browsing section across from our current periodicals on the first floor.

Below is just a handful of what we have to offer.  If you have a suggestion on a graphic novel to add to our collection we’d love to know!

Irmina by Barbara Yelin

Call Number: PN6757.Y45 I75 2016

In the mid-1930s, Irmina, an ambitious young German, moves to London. At a cocktail party, she meets Howard Green, one of the first black students at Oxford, who, like Irmina, is working towards an independent existence. However, their relationship comes to an abrupt end when Irmina, constrained by the political situation in Hitler’s Germany, is forced to return home. As war approaches and her contact with Howard is broken, it becomes clear to Irmina that prosperity will only be possible through the betrayal of her ideals. In the award-winning Irmina, Barbara Yelin presents a troubling drama about the tension between integrity and social advancement, reflecting with compassion and intelligence on the complicity that results from the choice, conscious or otherwise, to look away.

 

 

Call Number: PN6728.V57 K56 2016 v.1-2

Independent Voices — Digital Alternative Press Comes to Hope

Feminist Voice

Independent Voices: An Open Access Collection of an Alternative Press is now available through the library. These periodicals were produced by feminists, dissident GIs, campus radicals, Native Americans, anti-war activists, Black Power advocates, Hispanics, LGBT activists, the extreme right-wing press and alternative literary magazines during the latter half of the 20th century (60’s, 70’s, and 80’s). The collection currently contains 14,097 issues.

Broken Arrow

Whether researching topics like peace activist A.J. Muste, the American Indian Movement,  the National Organization of Women or Vietnam War draft resistance,  Independent Voices provides access to sources not elsewhere available.

Black Americans for Democracy

 

 

Drawn from the special collections of participating libraries across the country, Independent Voices is made possible by the funding support received from libraries and donors across the U.S., Canada and the U.K. Through their funding, these libraries and donors are demonstrating their commitment to open access digital collections. Produced by Reveal Digital, access has been arranged through the library’s membership with the Center for Research Libraries.

FREE New York Times Subscription

STUDENTS, faculty and staff: We have fantastic news!

You no longer need to deal with Facebook commenters or figure out how to view more than your allotted amount of free articles when all you want is the (real) news.  With your .edu email address you can sign up for complimentary access to  The New York Times!  Use your hope.edu email address and choose a password.  You will receive a confirmation email with a link you must click to complete the subscription.

Also included are over 150 years of archives as they originally appeared; reproduced digitally. Search for important world events or see what was going on the day you were born. These archived articles are also easy to print making them perfect for primary source research.

Read the Times on the computer or on your Android or iPhone.

Stay informed!

 

Come Research With Us!

Do you remember a Research and Instruction Librarian coming in to your English 113 or FYS class?  Or maybe it was Chemistry or Political Science.  Your interactions don’t have to end in the classroom.  Our R&I Librarians are available right here in the library in a variety of ways.

You can schedule an appointment individually or with a small group.  This is a great way to get started on a project, narrow your topic, and receive advanced, personalized research help. Often these will result in follow-up interactions as your research evolves.

Stop in at the Research Help Desk!  It is always staffed with a trained student. Also, even if they aren’t sitting at the desk, our librarians are available Monday-Friday 8am- 5pm (except for the lunch hour) as well as Monday -Thursday evenings from 6pm-9pm and Sundays from 1pm-4pm. Our student assistants would be happy to connect you with one.

Short on time? Simply send an email and receive a prompt reply from a librarian.  You can also chat with the Research Help Desk staff while the library is open.

Make it a goal to let us help you this semester!

Todd Wiebe
Rachel Bishop
Jessica Hronchek – on sabbatical Spring 2017

3 Great Library Research Tools You Need to Add to your Toolbox

Doing great library research is a journey, with many wrong turns and some truly great eureka moments. Following are 3 great library research tools that can make your research journey less tedious, quicker, easier to track, and maybe even a little fun:


Zotero
An open-source citation management system, this is a tool to never leave home without. It allows you to save citations, PDFs, and websites with the click of a button. Citations can then be formatted in thousands of formats and integrated into both Google Docs and Microsoft Word. Zotero also supports group research and sharing.

LibX
A mighty toolbar for both Firefox and Chrome, LibX enables users to search library resources without ever leaving the webpage they are on. As a bonus, LibX will authenticate you if you are off-campus with a simple right-click on your mouse.

BrowZine
Want to know what the top journals are in your discipline? Need to be notified when the latest issue of Cell comes out? Love that your top journals are all available electronically but still want to arrange them on a bookcase? For all these reasons and more, BrowZine is a top choice for browsing/reading the journal literature.

What’s your favorite research tool? Please let us know in the comments or Tweet us @vanwylenlibrary!