New York Times Digital Edition

The New York Times digital edition is available for all students and faculty at Hope College. To get access, Hope users will need to create individual logins at this NYTimes.com site  and must use their 1Hope credentials to create an account. Follow the instructions to claim your pass. A list of frequently asked questions is available at the bottom of this post.

NYT

The online version includes not only the same articles, text and images that appear in the print edition, but also an array of additional still images, videos, audio and data content. About the only thing not included in the digital version is the crossword puzzles. The content is enriched by inclusion of longitudinal data from syndicates and data sources such as Thomson Reuters. The subscription also includes free access through the NYTNow iPhone app.

The library is interested in how access to the New York Times might be used within the curriculum, something that the NYT has been interested in as well. Given our emphasis on becoming more globally engaged and increasing student gains in writing and critical thinking, how might the NYT be used creatively within the classroom? Ideas for incorporating the New York Times into nearly all disciplines can be found on the NYT Classroom Ideas website.

Our subscription to the NYT digital edition was brokered by the Center for Research Libraries. CRL and academic libraries have an interest in preservation of the NYT, which is currently only being archived by the New York Times itself. No other major news organization is investing in data journalism and data analytics to the same extent, suggesting that the online NYT will become an even greater resource for scholarly research in the future. The digital edition is highly searchable and allows users to search for content going back to 1851. In addition to keyword searching, users will have access to the TimesMachine, digital replicas of every issue of the Times published from 1851 to 1980. Users can browse page by page and see articles, photos and ads as they originally appeared in print.

Here are some answers to Frequently Asked Questions about access to content:

I already have a NYTimes.com digital subscription. What should I do?
NYTimes.com does not permit a double entitlement. If you have an existing paid NYTimes.com subscription, you are not eligible for an Academic Pass. You should continue to access the Times via your own subscription.

Should I cancel my existing digital subscription to make use of the site license access?
The New York Times Academic Site License has some restrictions that your personal subscription maynot have. Consider the options carefully before deciding one way or another.

What are the restrictions?
Site license access does not include the NYTimes.com tablet apps. At this time, access to articles from the date range 1923 to 1986 is limited is limited to 5 articles for the 364-day period.

Can I access the Times off-campus?
Yes, as long as you have registered using your campus domain .edu e-mail address and obtained your Academic Pass.

Can I access the Times from my mobile device?
There are mobile apps for iPhone/iPod Touch (IOS 5.0+), Android (OS 2.1+), and Windows (7.5 O.S.) phones; these are included as part of the Academic Pass. Mobile apps for tablets are not part of the  Academic Pass. However, you can access the NYTimes.com mobile site (mobile.nytimes.com) or Times Skimmer (nytimes.com/skimmer) using your smartphone or tablet running one of the above operating systems.

CANCELLATION AND REFUND POLICY FOR DIGITAL PRODUCTS
Cancellation and Refunds of Digital Subscriptions (For those who currently subscribe)
You can cancel your digital product at any time by calling Customer Care at (800) 591-9233. For international customers, please e-mail us at help@nytimes.com. Group Subscription billing cycles and terms of cancellations may differ and are governed by the terms set forth in the Group Subscription Purchase Order.

Monthly and 4-Week Subscription Billing (For those who currently subscribe)
When you cancel, you cancel only future charges associated with your subscription. You may notify us of your intent to cancel at any time, but the cancellation will become effective at the end of your current billing period.

Cancellations are effective the following billing cycle. You will not receive a refund for the current billing cycle. You will continue to have the same access and benefits of your product for the remainder of the current billing period.

Annual Subscription Billing (For those who currently subscribe)
If you cancel within the first 11 months, your access and other benefits will end immediately and you will receive a refund prorated to the day.

If you cancel in the final 30 days, the cancellation will not take effect until the end of your current billing period. Your access and privileges will continue to the end of the current billing period, and you will not receive a refund.

How can I solve a problem accessing an NYTimes.com Academic Pass?

Welcome to Digital Holland

DHM Banner

Editor’s note: This is a guest post by Hope College student, Allyson Hoffman. You may reach her at  digitalholland@hope.edu. Start your experience with Digital Holland today.

Imagine yourself on a scavenger hunt, but the list of items to gather has been sliced and scattered around a city. By the time you gather the pieces of the list, you’ve spent days, months, maybe even years running back and forth, passing all of the items you were supposed to pick up, but didn’t know.

Although hyperbolic, this scenario mimics the struggles researchers face when trying to locate sources. Historians could travel across the world, gathering artifacts for their work, only to discover that there are dozens of other necessary pieces out there somewhere. The internet has helped expedite the research process, but traveling between websites can be time consuming and frustrating. Furthermore, if the artifacts aren’t digitized and hosted on a site, the researchers cannot access them.

The purpose of Digital Holland Michigan is to make the research about Holland, Michigan easier for everyone to locate—from the scholar to the amateur historian to the curious individual. The public-accessible website hosts digitized artifacts such as images, audio and video files, as well as text summaries written by several contributors. In two months, the Digital Holland Michigan team has created over 100 pages about the people, places, and events in Holland, as well as pages about Hope College, the liberal arts college in Holland, and historical maps of the city.

But the work is just beginning.

The goal for Digital Holland Michigan is continue adding artifacts from the Joint Archives of Holland, the Holland Museum, and items donated by community members. As long as life in Holland continues, so will history—and so there will always be something to add to the website.

1Search Gets a New Look

You may have noticed a slight change in the way search results are displayed in 1Search, Van Wylen Library’s 1-stop search stop. This 2.0-upgraded version is designed with the user in mind, making searches easier and more intuitive.

Like before, the facets on the left allow you to refine your results by content type, discipline, publication date, and much more (see image below). The search results are displayed in the middle, with clear indications as to whether something is available online or in print. News results are aggregated together, instead of interspersed throughout the search. Images are now clustered, as well, making them easier than ever to identify.

A search for "circus performers" yields results in 1Search
1Search 2.0

Hovering over a search result displays summary and publication information on the right. You may choose to cite the result or email the citation from the right-hand search display. Advanced searching is still available by choosing the drop-down arrow from the search box.

There are many ways to make your search experience fruitful using 1Search. As always, contact a librarian for any research-related help.

Image Collections @ Hope College Available via 1Search

Hope College digital image collections are now accessible through 1Search. Keywords can be used to find your topic related to Hope College history. You can choose “Image Collections @ Hope College” under the “Library Location” facet to limit your results to only the images from our digital repository. Here’s an example of a search using the Myron Van Ark postcard collection.

Van Ark_Location

Image Collections @ Hope College features rare and historic materials from the Hope College Libraries and Archives. These unique collections document the rich history of Hope College, which was chartered in 1866. Items cover a broad range of topics, including school traditions, historic buildings, programs, and more.

New York Times Digital Edition Now Available!

NYT

Access to the New York Times digital edition is now available for all students and faculty at Hope College. The New York Times, published since 1851, is the largest metropolitan newspaper in the United States. The online version includes not only the same articles, text and images that appear in the print edition, but also an array of additional still images, videos, audio and data content. About the only thing not included in the digital version is the crossword puzzles. The content is enriched by inclusion of longitudinal data from syndicates and data sources such as Thomson Reuters. The subscription also includes free access through the NYTNow iPhone app.

The library is interested in how access to the New York Times might be used within the curriculum, something that the NYT has been interested in as well. Given our emphasis on becoming more globally engaged and increasing student gains in writing and critical thinking, how might the NYT be used creatively within the classroom? Ideas for incorporating the New York Times into nearly all disciplines can be found on the NYT Classroom Ideas website.

Our subscription to the NYT digital edition was brokered by the Center for Research Libraries. CRL and academic libraries have an interest in preservation of the NYT, which is currently only being archived by the New York Times itself. No other major news organization is investing in data journalism and data analytics to the same extent, suggesting that the online NYT will become an even greater resource for scholarly research in the future. The digital edition is highly searchable and allows users to search for content going back to 1851. In addition to keyword searching, users will have access to the TimesMachine, digital replicas of every issue of the Times published from 1851 to 1980. Users can browse page by page and see articles, photos and ads as they originally appeared in print.

To get access, Hope users will need to create individual logins at the NYTimes.com site  and must use their 1Hope credentials to create an account. Follow the instructions to claim your pass.

Here are some answers to Frequently Asked Questions about access to content:

I already have a NYTimes.com digital subscription. What should I do?
NYTimes.com does not permit a double entitlement. If you have an existing paid NYTimes.com subscription, you are not eligible for an Academic Pass. You should continue to access the Times via your own subscription.

Should I cancel my existing digital subscription to make use of the site license access?
The New York Times Academic Site License has some restrictions that your personal subscription maynot have. Consider the options carefully before deciding one way or another.

What are the restrictions?
Site license access does not include the NYTimes.com tablet apps. At this time, access to articles from the date range 1923 to 1986 is limited is limited to 5 articles for the 364-day period.

Can I access the Times off-campus?
Yes, as long as you have registered using your campus domain .edu e-mail address and obtained your Academic Pass.

Can I access the Times from my mobile device?
There are mobile apps for iPhone/iPod Touch (IOS 5.0+), Android (OS 2.1+), and Windows (7.5 O.S.) phones; these are included as part of the Academic Pass. Mobile apps for tablets are not part of the  Academic Pass. However, you can access the NYTimes.com mobile site (mobile.nytimes.com) or Times Skimmer (nytimes.com/skimmer) using your smartphone or tablet running one of the above operating systems.

CANCELLATION AND REFUND POLICY FOR DIGITAL PRODUCTS
Cancellation and Refunds of Digital Subscriptions (For those who currently subscribe)
You can cancel your digital product at any time by calling Customer Care at (800) 591-9233. For international customers, please e-mail us at help@nytimes.com. Group Subscription billing cycles and terms of cancellations may differ and are governed by the terms set forth in the Group Subscription Purchase Order.

Monthly and 4-Week Subscription Billing (For those who currently subscribe)
When you cancel, you cancel only future charges associated with your subscription. You may notify us of your intent to cancel at any time, but the cancellation will become effective at the end of your current billing period.

Cancellations are effective the following billing cycle. You will not receive a refund for the current billing cycle. You will continue to have the same access and benefits of your product for the remainder of the current billing period.

Annual Subscription Billing (For those who currently subscribe)
If you cancel within the first 11 months, your access and other benefits will end immediately and you will receive a refund prorated to the day.

If you cancel in the final 30 days, the cancellation will not take effect until the end of your current billing period. Your access and privileges will continue to the end of the current billing period, and you will not receive a refund.

How can I solve a problem accessing an NYTimes.com Academic Pass?

LearningExpress Library

LearningExpress Library

Whether you’re studying for the GRE or preparing for a professional exam, LearningExpress Library is available to help you. Utilize the Learning Centers to take practice tests, exercises, learn new skills, and prepare yourself for a job.

In addition to test prep, LEL has tools to help with your resume, job search, and interviewing skills. There are interactive tutorials available to help you build your knowledge of popular software, like Adobe products, Microsoft suite, and more. Create an account for free today to get started.

Digital Public Library of America Opens

web(white)-square-with-wordsHave you ever visited the Library of Congress online? Or what about Holland’s own Joint Archives? What if you could find all the online holdings of these two very different institutions in one place?

That’s where the Digital Public Library of America comes in.

On April 18, 2013, the Digital Public Library of America launched a beta version of their discovery portal. The portal provides access to millions of items from archives, libraries, museums, and cultural institutions around the country. DPLA serves as a platform for digital collections from places as small as local archives to as large as the federal government’s holdings.

The aim of the DPLA is to make what’s already openly available easier to access and discover.  In addition to general searches, users can explore by date, place, or exhibition.  Of the 2.4 million records available, you can find letters by George Washington from the National Archives, a French Book of Hours from the University of South Carolina, or historic photographs from the Nicollet County Historical Society in Minnesota.

Having all this information in one place makes primary source research easier and more accessible.  Browsing the collections can also trigger new research ideas, not limiting students to just the local archives. No need to travel to see some of the greatest collections in the country!

For now, the DPLA only includes items in the public domain; however, there is the possibility for expansion in the future. The main priority right now is to establish a platform that provides support for already digitized collections.

To find out more about DPLA, check out John Palfrey’s article in Library Journal, or DPLA’s FAQ page.

–Madalyn Muncy, Library Student Blogger