Things to Come Redefines a Mid-Life Crisis

Upon first reading the summary for Things to Come, I had a sense of predictability.

Here we have Nathalie, a high-school philosophy teacher who seems to have all her ducks in a row. She has a job she’s passionate about, a happy marriage of 25 years, and two wonderful children who are growing up and fleeing the nest. Even if I stopped right there, your guess on what was coming next would be pretty accurate.

“I thought you’d love me forever,” says Nathalie, ruefully to her husband. “What an idiot.”

You guessed it – Nathalie’s world is thrown for a loop when her husband announces he is leaving her for another woman. I was rolling my eyes at this point. Hello! I’ve seen this plot before. Then, when director Mia Hansen-Love introduces Fabien, one of Nathalie’s favorite former students, my Hollywood-trained mind thought we had the entire movie figured out.

Think again.

As Amanda mentioned, the films we show at the Knickerbocker are not the mainstream, predictable movies many of us are used to. Foreign films, like Things to Come, don’t follow any kind of cookie cutter plot – they do their own thing, keeping viewers engaged with original content and story lines.

So no, we don’t see Nathalie meltdown, pursing a relationship with a younger man who reminds her of herself in her younger years. Instead, we see a woman of intellectual and emotional substance find new freedoms and understanding in her new life circumstances.

Honestly, how could you not appreciate Hansen-Love’s fresh perspective in this kind of crisis? Plus, the divorce isn’t the only turbulence in Nathalie’s life, but she faces each with grace and strength, concluding, “I am lucky to be fulfilled intellectually.” I truly value a character that is not unraveled when the things she assumed were certain are broken, but rather, remains rooted in her ideals and self-confidence.

Isabelle Huppert as Nathalie, with Roman Kolinka as Fabien.

There’s also something to be said about the teasingly-romantic, yet strictly platonic nature of Fabien and Nathalie’s relationship. I blame my Hollywood- accustomed mind once again for the half second where I hoped a romantic bond would develop between the two. Thankfully, I came to my senses and appreciated Fabien’s role in Nathalie’s new journey. It’s a friendship from one intellectual to another. More importantly, it’s a glimpse backwards for Nathalie, and a realization that she did not compromise her youthful ideas so much as matured into new ones.

Mia Hansen-Love redefines mid-life crisis in Things to Come. Nathalie remains rooted as a woman of mind and heart, avoiding the chance to slip back into her youthful ways and moving forward not by refilling the things that are void, but by understanding this new phase as another chance to live freely and confidently.

This French drama is lighthearted, thoughtful and surprising in a new way. Check out the official trailer and learn more about it on our press release.

The film is showing at 7:30pm from March 27-April 1.

Odille Parker
Event and Conference Manager

#GirlPower in The Eagle Huntress

My dad and me. He flew back from Singapore just to be there for “one of his proudest moments.”

Growing up with a dad who supported and encouraged every (reasonable) goal of mine, I completely relate to the bond between Aisholpan and her father. Much like my dad, Aisholpan’s father, Nurgaiv, believes in the power of hard work and determination – you  bet on yourself and you make it happen, knowing that he’ll always be in your corner.

This is especially true if you’re looking to be an eagle huntress…in a father-son-dominated tradition…the first in twelve generations, actually. Then you know he’s got his gear on and ready to do whatever it takes to help you succeed.

I’m obviously rallying hard behind The Eagle Huntress. Sure, the father-daughter duo angle tugs at my heart, but honestly, it’s the kind of story anyone can relate to.

Plus, could we pick a better film for Women’s History Month?!

Here we have a 13-year-old Aisholpan, facing off against 70 of the greatest Kazakh eagle hunters in Mongolia, riding deep into the mountains and enduring below-freezing temperatures and rigid landscapes to prove she’s a true eagle huntress. All the while, we’re celebrating the many amazing women throughout history and their contributions to society. (Cue applause).

Aisholpan and her father, Nurgaiv.

It’s easy to focus on the big names associated with this month, which is totally fine, because women like Susan B. Anthony, Clara Barton and Rosa Parks deserve the praise for their push for change and their ultimate achievements. However, I don’t think you need to have your own Wikipedia page to be celebrated. Every girl and woman with the drive to change the status quo, however big or small, is a heroine to me.

And Aisholpan is one of those girls. She may not go down in the history books, but in her little piece of the world, she’s doing something pretty great. I’d compare Aisholpan’s efforts to a woman looking to play for an NFL team – it’s a male dominated field, the idea would be vehemently rejected by traditionalists and it would be an uphill battle. But who says a woman with the right skills and a healthy dose of determination couldn’t get there?  Let’s not forget Sarah Thomas, the first full-time NFL official #babysteps. Most wouldn’t define either woman’s feat as monumental, but yet, their paths pave the potential for major change.

Each eagle can only have one master, so you’ll see Aisholpan capture and train her own.

So to me, March is for celebrating any woman that put in the hard work to reach their goals, and The Eagle Huntress is a perfect way for us to do so here at the Knick. Granted, more went into choosing this film than the fact that it coincides with Women’s History Month, like Simon Nibblet’s out-of-this-world cinematography, but honestly, we’re also all about that #girlpower.

The optimist in me believes you’ll be inspired by Aisholpan’s story. Maybe you’ll be like Nurgaiv and my dad and continue to push your daughter (or son for that matter) to really go after their dreams. Or maybe, there’s an Aisholpan inside of you waiting to take off. No matter your story, I think there’s something we can all take away from Aisholpan’s ambition to make her dream come alive.

Come see The Eagle Huntress from March 13 – 18 at 7:30 p.m. Watch the official movie trailer and learn more about the film on our press release.

Odille Parker
Event and Conference Manager