Simon Sinek Says: Start With Why

Simon Sinek says…

start with why

“[The] art of leading is about following your heart” (p. 59).

“Henry Ford summed it up best.  ‘If I had asked people what they wanted,” he said, “they would have said a faster horse.’  This is the genius of great leadership.  Great leaders and great organizations are good at seeing what most of us can’t see.  They are good at giving us things we would never think of asking for” (p. 60).

“When we are inspired, the decisions we make have more to do with who we are and less to do with the companies and products we’re buying” (p. 74).

“It’s hard to make a case to someone that your products or services are important in their lives based on external rational factors that you have defined as valuable….However, if your WHYs and their WHY correspond, then they will see your products and services as tangible ways to prove what they believe” (p. 74).

“The goal of business should not be to do business with anyone who simply wants what you have.  It should be to focus on the people who believe what you believe” (p. 80).

“Trust is not a checklist.  Fulfilling all your responsibilities does not create trust.  Trust is a feeling, not a rational experience.  We trust some people and companies even when things go wrong, and we don’t trust others even though everything might have gone exactly as it should have.  A completed checklist does not guarantee trust.  Trust begins to emerge when we have a sense that another person or organization is driven by things other than their own self-gain.  With trust comes a sense of value — real value, not just value equated with money.  Value, by definition, is the transference of trust.  You can’t convince someone you have value, just as you can’t convince someone to trust you.  You have to earn trust by communicating and demonstrating that you share the same values and beliefs” (p. 84).

“Leading…means that others willingly follow you — not because they hve to, not because they are paid to, but because they want to….Those who lead are able to do so because those who follow trust that the decisions made at the top have the best interest of the group at heart.  In turn, those who trust work hard because they feel like they are working for something bigger than themselves” (p. 85).

“Cultures are groups of people who come together around a common set of values and beliefs.  When we share values and beliefs with others, we form trust….That’s what a WHY does.  When it is clearly understood, it attracts people who believe the same thing” (pp. 88, 89).

“A company is a culture.  A group of people brought together around a common set of values and beliefs.  It’s not products or services that bind a company together.  It’s not size and might that make a company strong, it’s the culture — the strong sense of beliefs and values that everyone, from the CEO to the receptionist, all share” (p. 90).

“What all great leaders have in common is the ability to find good fits to join their organization — those who believe what they believe….Starting with WHY when hiring dramatically increases your ability to attract those who are passionate for what you believe” (p. 93).

“The role of a leader is not to come up with all the great ideas.  The role of the leader is to create an environment in which great ideas can happen” (p. 99).

“When people come to work with a higher sense of purpose, they find it easier to weather hard times or even to find opportunity in those hard times” (p. 101).

“[Only] when individuals can trust the culture or organization will they take personal risks in order to advance that culture or organization as a whole.  For no other reason than, in the end, it’s good for there own personal health and survival” (p. 104).

“For those within a community, or an organization, they must trust that their leaders provide a net — practical or emotional.  With that feeling of support, those in the organization are more likely to put in extra effort that ultimately benefits the group as a whole” (p. 104).

“The question is, how do you get enough of the influencers to talk about you so that you can make the system tip?” (p. 114).

“Regardless of WHAT we do in our lives, our WHY — our driving purpose, cause, or belief — never changes” (p. 136).

“As a company grows, the CEO’s job is to personify the WHY.  To ooze of it.  To talk about it. To preach it.  To be a symbol of what the company believes….As the organization grows, the leader becomes physically removed, further and further away from WHAT the company does, and even farther away from the outside market….[The] CEO’s job, the leaders’ responsibility, is not to focus on the outside market — it’s to focus on the layer directly beneath: HOW.  The leaders must ensure that there are people on the team who believe what they believe and know how to build it” (p. 157).

“The leader sitting on the top of the organization is the inspiration, the symbol of the reason we do what we do.  They represent the emotional limbic brain.  WHAT the company says and does represents the rational thought and language of the neocortex” (p. 158).

 

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