Announcing CFL Consulting Team’s Newest Student Cohort

Ryan Harvey

Ryan Havey hails from Wisconsin.  A Management Major, Ryan has experiences as a Badger Boys State Delegate, a worship leader at The Rock (Holland After School Ministries), and a mentor for special needs adults at the Holland Arts Council.

 

Ryan Johnson

Ryan Johnson come from Milford, Michigan.  Ryan intends to double-major in Mechanical Engineering and (Business) Management.  At Hope Ryan has been engaged in research on improving prosthetic devices.  He is also a member of Hope’s Swimming and Diving team.

 

Ivy Keen

Ivy Keen come to us from the Lone Star State.  At Hope she is a Psychology Major and a Management Minor.  She is also a Mellon Scholar, Teacher’s Assistant in the Psychology Department, Writing Assistant in Hope’s Klooster Center for Writing and Research, and a Student Tutor in Hope’s Academic Support Center.

 

Bridget Stenger

Bridget Stenger lives in nearby Grand Rapids.  She is a Management and International Studies Major and a Spanish Minor, where she is also a Teaching Assistant.  She also works as a tutor for Latin Americans United for Progress in Holland.

 

Adam VanderPloeg

Adam VanderPloeg hails from the Chicago area.  He is an Engineering and Management Major.  He is also minoring in Mathematics.  In his spare time he works for Admissions and Advancement at Hope.

 

Tyson Walton

Tyson Watson traveled from California to be at Hope.  At Hope, Tyson is a Management Major.  He also works as a lab technician for Hope Computer and Information Technology and as a Student Ambassador for Admissions.  He is also involved in Student Congress and volunteers at the Boys and Girls Club.

Next fall (August) this talented team will attend CFL Boot Camp with Coach Laurie Bos.  Following five 2-hour sessions, individual members will be assigned to project teams.  Projects or chunks of projects are 2-3 month commitments of between 5-10 hours a week.  After students complete a project they are evaluated.  Some are promoted to become student team leaders on future projects.

Each project team is led by an experienced project leader with years of consulting and/or non-profit or for-profit business experience.  The goal is for the experienced project leader to move from being the “driver of the car” to becoming a passenger in the back seat so that the students can learn how to lead meetings, how to understand and solve complex problems, and communicate with subject matter experts and the client.

Changes at the Office

Re-Visioning

  • Let’s change higher education.  Let’s lead by example.  Let’s put students at the center.  Let’s help them discover, develop, reflect on, and use their talents to the glory of God.  Let’s prepare them to be internship and job ready.  Let’s transition them out of college.  Let’s help them launch their dreams!
  • To do so, let’s change the way we relate to each other (within the institution) to better discover, develop, and reflect on and use our gifts.
  • Let’s also change the way we relate to the world outside of the academy.  In fact, let’s bring it inside and the academy outside.

Re-positioning — Changing the Way We Relate to the World

  • God created the world and he created us.  And all he created was good.  And he put us in charge of his world.  But through our lack of faith and disobedience unrighteousness entered the world.  And so things and people aren’t as they should be.  Now, through Christ, God is making all things new.
  • We dream of a changed world.  We want to participate in changing the world.  Students wish to make a difference.   We can assist them by making them dream- and job-ready.
  • CFL is becoming the Center for Launching dreams (for our students and community).

 

Gospelseed Clara and Jessica Lloyd and John

  • Consult Students are recruited and apply to become “Consulting Associates” on CFL’s Consulting Team.  After a robust interview and “boot camp” process, selected students are assigned and paid to work on project teams with coaches on complex problems with and for real organizations.  Students are hired on a per project or per project chunk basis (projects last 2 months to 2 years.)  To prepare, students are encouraged to enroll in a consultative leadership class (currently LDRS 391).  Eventually, they will be required to.
  • Incubate   Students are recruited and apply to become “Start-Up Associates.”  After a robust interview process, selected students are provided financial support to pursue the development of their ideas into businesses.  Students are then awarded on a semester or term basis, provided they meet with our entrepreneurial team once every other week.  To prepare, students must enroll in LDRS 231: Entrepreneurial Leadership.  Students may also apply for the Great Commission Grant to extend a program idea initiated in LDRS 201: Servant Leadership.
  • Coordinate Won’t it be cool when our students consult the start-ups we helped launch and help those we consulted to launch start-ups?

Spring 2014 Josh

Re-designing Space — Changing the Way We Relate to Each Other

  • An open place for the director:

office

  • A new space to ideate:

library

library2

Lounge

  • New office space for our collaborative staff:

LayoutCFL: the Center for Launching students and their dreams.

What Easter Means to CFL

God created the world and he created us.  And all he created was good.  And he put us in charge of his world.

But through our lack of faith and disobedience unrighteousness entered the world.  And so things and people aren’t as they should be.

Now, through Christ, God is making all things new.

Do you dream of a changed world?  Do you want to participate in changing the world?

We do.  We are changing higher education.

How?  We help students:

  • Discern their calling by helping them discover, develop, and use their gifts to the glory of God
  • Prepare them for internships and jobs
  • Transition them out of college

Here is what we do:

  • Consult Students are recruited and apply to become “Consulting Associates” on CFL’s Consulting Team.  After a robust interview and “boot camp” process, selected students are assigned and paid to work on project teams with coaches on complex problems with and for real organizations.  To prepare, students are encouraged to enroll in a consultative leadership class (currently LDRS 391).
  • Incubate   Students are recruited and apply to become “Start-Up Associates.”  After a robust interview process, selected students are provided financial support to pursue the development of their ideas into businesses.  To prepare, students must enroll in LDRS 231: Entrepreneurial Leadership.  Students may also apply for the Great Commission Grant to extend a program idea initiated in LDRS 201: Servant Leadership.

Spring 2014 Josh

Won’t it be cool when our students consult the start-ups we helped launch and help those we consulted launch start-ups?

Won’t it be cool when our hope of a changed world becomes reality?  Because of Christ’s resurrection, it will!

CFL: the Center For Launching dreams.

CFL’s Entrepreneurship Development Program*

LDRS 231

LDRS 231: Entrepreneurship Leadership

If you want to dive head first into entrepreneurship sign up for LDRS 231: Entrepreneurial Leadership. The class is definitely not like the typical lecture class. There is a lot of learning by doing and collaboration between students and successful entrepreneurs in the community.

Pitch Competitions

Pitch Competitions

Take your great idea and turn it into cash!  Sign up for the Idea Pitch and Learn or the Investor Pitch and Learn and earn yourself some free, no-strings attached seed money for your great idea.

CFL Incubator

CFL’s Incubator

The best thing the entrepreneurial program has to offer!  Get paid to work on your idea for this 10-week summer internship. Visit and talk to all the hot-shot entrepreneurs in West Michigan while growing your idea with fellow entrepreneurs.

Start Garden

Start Garden

What if you need thousands of dollars to get started? Well, Start Garden gives out five thousand dollars to one idea every two weeks!  Hope students have won $60,000 in prize money and have received hours of free consultation along with many other perks.

warehaus3

Warehaus

The Warehaus is an entrepreneur’s study place.  Right down Columbia street from Hope College it makes getting plugged into the entrepreneurial community very convenient.

start-up academe

Start-up AcademE

Nope, we spelled it right.  Start-up AcademE, L3C, which is a small group group of dedicated first-time entrepreneurs and experts who help you keep your idea growing.

Now that you know what CFL’s Entrepreneurial Leadership program offers, why not give it a shot?  Sign up for the class, join a competition, or jump into the community!

Want more information? Email student entrepreneurs at incubator@hope.edu. We’d love to talk to you more, and help get those great ideas of yours into something that can be influential.   And find us on Facebook!

 *Written by Matt Gira.

Some of the Businesses Being Created by Hope College Students*

SAS

Songs Against Slavery is a non-profit organization founded by Grace Theisen and Lauren Lancaster. They had this crazy idea that their passion for music and Jesus could help others escape the chains of modern-day slavery.  From performing right on the streets of downtown Holland themselves to having Steve Moakler and Andrew Ripp play concerts right here at Hope to help fight against slavery, they’ve had tremendous success.

Website: http://www.songsagainstslavery.com

Twitter: @SAS_ENDSLAVERY

Sweet Spot Wheels

Being a Pre-Med and Jazz Studies Major, it only makes sense to start your own longboard wheel company, right?  For Jared Demeester it did.  Jared and his pal, Alex Bolen, created Sweet Spot Wheels, a long board wheel company that donates 10% of sales towards building wells and providing clean water to remote villages in Africa and other regions where clean water is scarce.  These wheels are so cool that Sweet Spot Wheels won $25,000 from Start Garden, and are used by all the hipsters on campus.  Milk Surfer wheels even come in milk cartons!

Website: http://www.sweetspotwheels.com/

Ring Cam

Who knew college classes were useful?  In their senior year, some engineering students applied their learning and created Ring Cam in their senior design class.  Ring Cam is a ring box that is able to video record those precious moments when a guy is popping the question to his gal from the ring box itself.  The students won numerous competitions and have been working on this business even after they graduated.  The irony of this business?  None of the the creators are engaged.

Website: http://www.getringcam.com.

 Tizzy

Have no fear, freshmen year is here!  At least that’s what Jessica Granger’s motto must be since she’s started her business as a first-year student at Hope College.  Jessica and Macall Smith have been working on an app they call Tizzy.  Tizzy helps you decide which clothes to wear for that special occasion, or even just to see who your friends are picking to win the basketball game against Calvin.  (We all know the answer to that one though.)  Post two pictures on the app, and your friends vote on which is better.  It’s just like Instagram, except you can tizzy it up!

Jam Jars

It’s really cool how a chemistry major helps one become a “craftier” person!  I guess that’s what must have happened to Matt Gira.  As a first-year student, Matt was playing around with speakers as part of his introductory engineering course, and bam!  Lio was born.  This year, not yet thinking it would be such a cool product, he brought us his first Jam Jar prototype in October.  Now he’s developed a great looking, awesome sounding, environmentally friendly, and socially-conscious product.  (Matt gives 7% of sales towards fighting world hunger.)

Website: https://www.etsy.com/shop/LioTech 

(http://www.lioproducts.com coming soon!)

 

Ideas are all around us.  We help students harness those ideas and develop them.

Want more information? Email entrepreneurial students at incubator@hope.edu.

Find CFL Incubator on Facebook.

*Text written by Matt Gira.

Seeking Integrity

Robert Quinn (Building the Bridge As We Walk Across It, Change the World, Deep Change) has made a foundational discovery: we were made to live not as we do but with greater meaning, confidence, purpose, and joy.  He distinguishes the way we live most of the time with the way we can live in exceptional times — when we are at our best and living according to our potential.  The former is called the Normal State of Leadership and the latter the Fundamental State of Leadership.  Applying Quinn’s Fundamental State of Leadership Principles in the context of the Christian faith leads me to the following reflections.

To experience the meaning, confidence, purpose, and joy of integrity, I need to seek it.  God has created me through Christ and God through Christ has made my relationship with Him whole.  I am completely dependent on God for not only eternal life but a joyful life.  God has made spiritual integrity possible.  That makes integrity in all of life possible.  Now what?  How do I experience this wholeness in everyday life?

But not being normal.

I need to become abnormal by seeking the Fundamental State of Leadership.

  • Values: Internal-motivated versus Externally-directed.   I continue to slide back and forth on this continuum.  As I narrow the gap between what I believe and what I do, a force keeps pushing me back.  To narrow the gap again, I need to articulate what I believe and make decisions accordingly.  Here are some of my beliefs about calling, learning, and focus.
  • Calling: Purpose-centered versus Comfort-centered.  I believe God has a general call on all of us and a specific call on each of us.  The general call consists of the choice to be co-creators and co-managers of His creation.  But in order to do this in the more effective way, we need to become more like Christ in our thoughts and actions.  (The general call is theologically grounded in what some call the “Cultural Mandate” [found in Genesis] and the “Great Commission” [found in Matthew].)  At the same time, God has a specific calling on all of us.  How we become more like Christ in the way we co-create and co-manage God’s creation depends on the unique gifts and opportunities God gives us.  I believe God has wired me to be a builder and has given me experiences in education and business.  He has called me to help build the infrastructure to help others discover, develop, and use their gifts in the context of business leadership.  To help me stay purpose driven, Quinn suggests certain “creative practices:”  Authentic Engagement and Reflective Action and, because of experiences with them, the ability to face uncertainty with Adaptive Confidence.
  • Learning: Open-minded versus Closed-minded.  The particulars of how I help build the infrastructure to help others discover, develop, and use their gifts for business leadership is revealed to me through my interactions with others.  In other words, I believe God speaks to and blesses us through others.   While I God may speak to me in other ways (e.g., intuition), it is others who help me discern His general call specifically for my life in all my relationships.  I also believe it isn’t just anyone who helps me discern his call, but those who are His people.  To help me be open-minded, Quinn suggests the creative practices of Grounded Vision and Appreciative Inquiry.
  • Focus: Others versus Self.  One of the keys to reaching the Fundamental State of Leadership is to strive to be others-focused.  That means I must strive to seek relationships and sustain them by meeting the needs of others, and the scope of these relationships are three concentric circles: interpersonal, team, and community.  To help me do this, Quinn suggests the creative practices of Detached Interdependence, Responsible Freedom, and Tough Love.

Authentic Engagement – To be“principled and ethical while involved and engaged,” being in the world, devoted, with a sense of calling and purpose.

Reflective Action – To be “spend time in reflect contemplation” and thankfulness in meditation and prayer with God, while being “deeply engaged in the world.”

Adaptive Confidence – To be “adaptable and flexible while being confident and secure,” willing to enter uncertain situations because of a higher purpose and a confidence that we can learn and adapt as we move forward.

Grounded Vision – Our goal is for CFL alums to be “grounded and factual while also hopeful and visionary,” having a vision that engages others that connects our realities and our hopes, a vision of significance — grounded in the anchor of our hope: God’s promises to us.

Appreciative Inquiry – To be “optimistic and constructive while also being realistic and questioning,” seeing the good and the possible in others an in the world.

Detached Interdependence –  To “independent and strong” in our convictions while also being “humble and open” to the influence of others.

Responsible Freedom — To be “spontaneous and expressive” while being “self-disciplined” and ethical.

Tough Love – To be “assertive and bold yet compassionate and concerned,” able to “call others to higher objectives and standards while also showing empathetic, relational support” — holding themselves and others accountable.

 

Being authentically engaged is a difficult tension to satisfy, particularly when one is seeking to choose among employment or membership opportunities:  Here are some questions to ponder:

  • Is the mission of the organization worth living for?
  • Is the vision of organization worth working toward?
  • Is the organization helping you meet a need you care about?
  • Is what you do important to the organization?
  • Is what you are doing something God has been preparing your for?
  • Are you fully using your gifts? Can you faithfully use your gifts?
  • Is God at work where you work?  Is the organization changing or ready for change?
  • Is seeking first God’s kingdom and God’s righteousness leading you there?

Hopefully as we get older and know more about ourselves and the world, we will seek to be here our greatest gifts meets the greatest needs which leads to the deepest joy.

Spring 2014 Investor Pitch and Learn Results

Thanks to our student competitors and dedicated judges for creating a powerful learning experience for Hope’s entrepreneurial leaders!

Here they are arranged by room (judges’ and student awardees’ names are in bold font).

 

VanZoeren 153

Judges: Mark deRoo, Abbey Johnston, David Stavenger, David Tapley, Josh Teusink

7:05 PM: Stephen Gerger

7:20 PM: Matt Gira — Jelly Jam Jars (high quality sound from an unlikely place)!

7:35 PM: Mitch Juhl

7:50 PM: Justyn Root

8:05 PM: Jacob Warriner

8:20 PM: Matt VanDixhorn

Spring 2014 Rm 153

 

VanZoeren 165

Spring 2014 Rm 165

Judges: Scott Brandonisio, Tyler Essenburg, Russell Fyfe, Seth Getz, Brad MacLean

7:05 PM: Maxwell Castille

7:20 PM: Steven Felusme

7:35 PM: Brandon Flood/Joseph Pappas

7:50 PM: Jessica Granger/Macall Smith — Tizzy (a unique “this or that” comparison app)

8:05 PM: Daniel Kuyper

8:20 PM:Stacy Sienkiewicz

Spring 2014 Jessica and Macall

 

VanZoeren 174

Spring 2014 RM 174

Judges: Bill Andresen, Jason Cash, Tim Haines, Doug Iverson, Melyn VandenBerg

7:05 PM: Zachary Fex

7:20 PM: Anthony Guisti

7:35 PM: Chloe Heckaman/Jodi Beckman — Hope Does (a program that gives students the opportunity to love others)

7:50 PM: Clara Starr

8:05 PM: Krystle Vliem

Spring 2014 Chloe and Jodi

 

VanZoeren 182

Spring 2014, Rm 182

Judges: Kent Bosma, John Johnston, Tracey Nally, Jody VanderWel, Ken VanderWende

7:05 PM: Anders Broullire

7:20 PM: Cody Herbruck

7:35 PM: Joshua Kranz — Athletetek (creator of the technically-advanced SMARTpaddle)

7:50 PM: Jordan Rose

8:05 PM: Jonathan Tuck

Spring 2014 Josh

 

RULES

This is a pitch and learn competition!

Hope College student contestants are assigned to groups of 6-7 students, a room, a panel of judges (who are entrepreneurial leadership from the Holland-area community) and a time to present.

Contestants give a 3-minute presentation to judges sitting around a table (using hardcopy Powerpoint slides as an outline); the judges then have 5 minutes to questions. Props (Prototypes or MVP) are required.  (Only the contestant and judges are allowed in the room.)

After hearing all the presentations and conversations, the judges gather to discuss (1) what feedback (strengths and challenges of the idea and the presentation) to give, and (2) which student to award a $250 prize (pre-tax, paid via Hope’s student payroll system). The judges then meet with the students as a group to discuss their individual strengths and challenges and to announce the $250 award winner.

The outline for the investor pitch is as follows: (1) the customer problem, (2) the students’ solution to that problem, (3) the high level business model explaining how the idea will make money or be funded, (4) the marketing and sales plan to convert suspects to “evangelists,” (5) the competitive landscape and positioning, (6) financial projections and assumptions and current status of the business. (See “The Art of the Pitch” in the book The Art of the Start as a reference [pp. 51, 52].)

Contestants’ ideas are evaluated in terms of market desirability (i.e., do customers prefer it, want to buy it, use it, give money to it or pay for it), technical feasibility (i.e., does the product work and do what it is supposed to do), business feasibility (i.e., is this idea financially sustainable), and scalability (i.e., can the idea grow to meet the needs of a large number of users/customers). Presenters are also evaluated in terms of their passion and quality of speech.  (See scoresheet.)