Angelique Gaddy-McElveen: Hope College Athletics Podcast

The Hope Athletics Orange and Blue Podcast has returned this summer for a third season with a special series of interviews with Hope College student-athletes, administration and staff. 

For the summer’s second episode, sports information director Alan Babbitt sits down with Angelique Gaddy-McElveen, Hope College’s Assistant Athletic Director of Philanthropy.

Angelique Gaddy poses for a portrait outside of DeVos Fieldhouse.
Angelique Gaddy-McElveen

In this new role, Gaddy-McElveen leads Athletics’ philanthropy efforts in collaboration with the college’s Philanthropy and Engagement Division.

This strategic partnership will allow Athletics to broaden and strengthen its commitment to providing a transformational experience where student-athletes can thrive academically and athletically through programs focused on their holistic development and preparing them for lives of leadership and impact.

“I did a lot of listening, then also pulled into some efforts that we had already started over the last year,” Gaddy-McElveen said of her work as Assistant Athletic Director of Philanthropy since January when she started. “When I wasn’t in this role yet, last October, we started corporate sponsorships for athletics that was headed by Keagan Pontius, women’s lacrosse coach. We worked very closely together. We also have our Orange and Blue Fund; that’s headed by Dan Osterbaan. The three of us do a lot of things regarding annual giving and corporate sponsorships. 

“I was brought on to lead those efforts to put more synergy behind the direction of them altogether, acting as one. I’ll be working more so with some of those major gifts and cultivating those relationships of how can we really pair, whether it’s parents, alumni, fans, friends of the college, how can we pair what their passions are, their desires for student-athletes, coaches, programming, and make that a real opportunity for those different areas on campus.”

Hope-Full History

Prior to joining the Hope Athletics administration, Gaddy-McElveen served on the college’s admissions team for three years and was responsible for admissions recruitment in the Chicagoland area and seven schools in Grand Rapids, Michigan. Most recently, she taught a first-year seminar titled “Mamba Mentality and Motivation”. She serves as a first-year advisor.

In 2019, Gaddy-McElveen earned her Master’s degree in Sport Management from Western Michigan University. In 2017, she graduated from Hope with bachelor’s degrees in business and communication.

After graduating from Hope, Gaddy-McElveen worked as a compliance specialist at Grand Valley State University for two years.

At Hope, Gaddy-McElveen was a standout student-athlete on the women’s basketball team that posted a 103-11 overall record over four seasons.

The Flying Dutch made four NCAA Division III Tournament appearances and claimed three MIAA titles between 2014 and 2017. A guard, Gaddy-McElveen received All-MIAA First Team honors as a junior and All-MIAA Second Team honors as a senior. She was elected team captain as a senior and junior.

Read a written transcript of the interview.

Dan Romano: Hope College Athletics Podcast

The Hope Athletics Orange and Blue Podcast is returning this summer for a third season with a special series of interviews with Hope College student-athletes, administration and staff. 

Dan Romano poses for a portrait.
Dan Romano

For this summer’s first episode, sports information director Alan Babbitt sits down with recent graduate Dan Romano ‘23, this year’s male recipient of the Hope Athletics Be Strong. Be True. Athlete of the Year award, and Flying Dutchmen head football coach Peter Stuursma.

The Be Strong. Be True. Athlete of the Year award is presented to a male and female junior or senior who demonstrates the true essence of being a student-athlete and embodies the Division III motto of Discover, Develop, Dedicate. This student-athlete is in high academic standing (minimum GPA of 3.5), plays a significant role on the team, and is involved in the Hope and Holland community. 

Later this summer, we will chat with the 2023 female recipient, senior swimmer Delaney Wesolek, and head swimming and diving coach Jake Taber. Both Wesolek and Romano received their awards during the HOPEYs ceremony in April.

“Taking advantage of every opportunity”

Romano packed in a lot of activity as a student-athlete at Hope:

  • Majored in biomedical and mechanical engineering, minored in mathematics; 
  • Two-year starter on the football team while earning All-MIAA Second Team honors as a junior and recording a pair of 200-yard rushing games;
  • Semifinalist for the National Football Foundation’s Campbell Trophy that recognizes a college football student-athlete for his academic success, football performance and exemplary leadership; 
  • Served on Hope’s and MIAA’s ACT-SAAC (Athletes Coming Together-Student Athlete Advisory Council);
  • Participated in a SEED (Sport Evangelism to Equip Disciples) trip in 202’
  • Co-lead Bible study for the football team.

After graduating last month, Romano married Hannah Cross ‘23 and began working at Gentex Corporation as a product design engineer.

On the Hope Athletics Orange and Blue Podcast, Romano said he used his time as a student-athlete at Hope as an opportunity to grow, to meet people, to become just to become the better version of himself. 

“I did find myself saying yes a lot and taking advantage of every opportunity that I could,” Romano said. “That just led me down a road to one being busy, but also just really growing in every aspect of my life. Whether it was football, academics my faith with the Bible study being a leader on ACT-SAAC, or repping the MIAA, they were all just like really cool opportunities I didn’t want to pass up on.

“I saw it more as like I want to excel in it and be the best that I can be in it.”

Read a written transcript of interview

Hope College Student-Athlete Spotlight: Seth Almquist, Men’s Golf

Seth Almquist watches his iron shot on the golf course.
Senior Seth Almquist

Seth Almquist is teeing off for Hope College for the final time this week at the NCAA Division III Championships in Kentucky.

Shortly after Almquist’s final round on the course, the recent graduate and Minneapolis, Minnesota, native, will travel to Africa to learn about global missions from Poetice International. 

Almquist majored in environmental geochemistry at Hope and played on the Flying Dutchmen’s 2022 MIAA regular-season and 2023 MIAA Tournament championship team.

He shared how his life was transformed as a student-athlete at Hope and how he aims to keep his Christian faith at the center of everything he does, including the national stage as a golfer.

The 72-hole, four-day NCAA Championships begin on Tuesday, May 16, at Keene Trace Golf Club in Nicholasville, Ky., outside of Lexington. There is a cut after 36 holes.

1. What are your post-graduation plans? 

Almquist: Starting on May 20, I will participate in the “Intensive Training Program” hosted by Poetice International in Choma, Zambia. This is a six-week program designed to help grow in faith and community in preparation for future work in global missions. After that trip, I plan to spend some time with my family back in Minnesota, then find a job. I’m hoping to work at the intersection between global drinking water access and Christian mission but am uncertain at what exact role I’m being called to in that field. 

2. What drew you to majoring in environmental geochemistry?

Almquist: I’ve always loved spending time in nature in my free time and have been very interested in science academically. As I looked for a major that piqued these interests, chemistry suited the scientific side, but it wasn’t quite right. Thankfully, Hope has a composite major where I could work with the geology and chemistry departments to create one major across both disciplines. I love how applicable the class material is to real-world problems like water and air pollution. I love I get to learn about these things from a chemistry perspective, which is super interesting to me.

3.  What has it meant to be able for you to pursue your interests at Hope in the classroom as well as on the golf course?

Almquist: Hope has been such a great place for me both academically and athletically. The ability to be a full-time student, do research on campus, and then also compete on the team has made my time here so special. A senior on the team my freshman year saw golf as his reward for working hard in the classroom, and I’ve adopted that for myself. I get to go to practice and forget about schoolwork for a few hours. It has created a great balance in my life over my four years. I’m so grateful to have the opportunities Hope has provided me.

4. What was the game of golf taught you beyond the course?

Almquist: Every golf ball I play with has “AO1” written on it, which stands for “Audience of One”. I do this as a reminder that I’m playing golf at Hope because God has gifted me with the skill set to do so. No matter how well or poorly I’m playing and how many people are there watching, God’s opinion is all that matters, and I am honoring him by doing what I love. I’ve taken this viewpoint outside of golf into my everyday life. I am trying to be authentic to who I am, knowing that God is proud of me, and I don’t need to change based on what others think.

5. What does it mean to have to have the opportunity to compete at nationals with your teammates?

Almquist: I’m beyond excited. To cap off my senior year with a trip to nationals with these guys is an amazing way to finish my collegiate career. I’m really looking forward to taking it all in and enjoying the moment while hopefully playing well in the process. We set the goal at the beginning of the fall season to make the cut at nationals. I’m hopeful that I can contribute and help the team achieve that goal.

Hope College Student-Athlete Spotlight: Jackson Player and Helen Dodge

Jackson Player and Helen Dodge pose for portraits.
Pictured, from left, seniors Jackson Player and Helen Dodge

Seniors Jackson Player and Helen Dodge relish their opportunity to pursue their academic and athletic interests as members of the Hope College indoor and outdoor track and field teams.

Player, a psychology major from San Antonio, Texas (Winston Churchill HS), and Dodge, a biology major from Grosse Pointe Park, Michigan (Grosse Pointe South), both are competing at the MIAA Indoor Championships this weekend.

The one-day meet is scheduled to begin on Saturday, April 25, at 9:30 a.m. at Trine University. Player is a record-setting hurdler and one of the Flying Dutchmen’s top jumpers. Dodge is an accomplished sprinter and long jumper.

Player and Dodge shared their experiences as student-athletes and how Hope College is transforming their lives.

1. What do you enjoy most about competing in track and field?  

Player:  The thing that I enjoy most about competing is getting to see hard work pay off and getting to experience the successes of my teammates firsthand. 

Dodge: What I enjoy most about competing in track and field is that it’s an independent sport in which you are trying to break your own personal records, but it is also a team effort in which we work together to score points for our team in order to win and push each other to work harder and run faster.

2. How has being a college athlete helped you in the classroom?

Dodge: Being a college athlete has helped me in the classroom with time management skills. I have needed to prioritize getting my homework and studying done without procrastinating since we spend 1-2 hours at practice every day. Having track practice is a nice break from school where we get to hang out with friends while being productive and getting a workout in.

Player: Being a college athlete has helped me stay driven in the classroom and helped me find a healthy balance between schoolwork and competition. 

3. How is your time at Hope College transforming you as a person?

Player: My time at Hope College has transformed my work ethic in a significant way. During my time here I’ve found myself more driven to succeed both on the track and in the classroom. I feel fortunate that Hope has provided me with a place full of support that allows for such significant growth. 

Dodge: My time at Hope College has transformed me as a person by allowing me to realize that it’s important to find joy in everyday things. I am able to do this by laughing and having fun with my teammates every day at practice.

Hope College Student-Athlete Spotlight: Jess Estabrook, Christian Dunaitis

Jess Estabrook and Christian Dunaitis poses for portraits.

Junior Jess Estabrook and sophomore Christian Dunaitis make the most of their time in the classroom and in the pool swimming competitively for Hope College.

Estabrook, a neuroscience major from Carmel, Indiana, and Dunaitis, a business major from Commerce Township, Michigan, near Detroit, both are competing at the MIAA Championships this week at Calvin University.

Dunaitis is a returning MIAA champion in the 100-yard breaststroke and a member of the 2021-22 MIAA Academic Honor Roll. Estabrook is a two-MIAA Academic Honor Roll recipient.

Both student-athletes are looking to help their nationally-ranked teams repeat as MIAA team champions. The four-day event begins on Wednesday, Feb. 15, at 6:30 p.m. 

Estabrook and Dunaitis chatted about their experiences as student-athletes and how Hope College is transforming their lives.

What do you enjoy most about swimming competitively?  

Estabrook: What I love most about swimming competitively is the team aspect and the people that the sport has connected me with. There is no bond like the bond of team members who are committed to being the best they can be for one another. It really brings us all close to being able to lift one another up while we compete in the sport, and this bond carries outside of swimming as well. I’m so grateful to have a great community of friends and teammates.

Dunaitis: I love the chance to compete in big meets. I swim for the opportunity to compete for a conference title with an amazing group of guys. Meets like the MIAA conference championship are the most energetic and exciting meets a swimmer can participate in.  No matter the outcome this team makes swimming special. 

How has being a college athlete helped you in the classroom?

Dunaitis: Swimming has definitely forced me to be organized and dedicated to my work within the classroom. You must be as efficient with your time as possible since practices can take up so much of your day. 

Estabrook: Being a college athlete, I have developed discipline, time management skills, and receptiveness to feedback, which have helped me in the classroom as well as in the pool. Participating in a sport comes with a huge time commitment, and as a pre-med student, my classes require a lot of effort and quality study time as well, so I need to be disciplined in order to make it all work. The business forces me to stick to a schedule and to be productive. As an athlete, it is important to be coachable so that I can always be improving, and this has served me well in the classroom to be ready to ask professors for help in areas of weakness.

How is your time at Hope College transforming you as a person?

Estabrook: Through my time at Hope, I am finding out how to be the person that I have always wanted to be. I’ve met the most amazing people who support me and lift me up. I’m learning leadership skills and how to work cohesively with a team. I’m receiving a quality education which will serve me well in my future career. I’m being equipped as a disciple of Christ by everyone who has poured into me spiritually. I feel as though my time at Hope has grown my confidence and equipped me to achieve things that I never thought possible.

Dunaitis: Since coming to Hope, I have learned a lot from the people around me. The kindness on campus is contagious. Everyone is so uplifting which creates a uniquely positive environment on campus. Hope has transformed me into an optimistic and encouraging person. 

Hope College Student-Athlete Spotlight: Dan Romano

Senior Dan Romano smiles in the end zone after scoring a Hope College touchdown.

Senior football player Dan Romano has run full speed during his time as a Hope College student-athlete. Whether on the field, in the classroom or at a service opportunity, he’s been determined to make the most of every minute.

The running back is one of 156 semifinalists for the National Football Foundation’s Campbell Trophy, which recognizes a college football student-athlete for his academic success, football performance and exemplary leadership. Last fall, Romano was named a College Sports Communicators (formerly CoSIDA) Academic All-American in football.

Romano (Royal Oak, Michigan / Shrine Catholic HS) also makes time to serve as one of two Hope College representatives on the Michigan Intercollegiate Athletic Association’s Student-Athlete Advisory Council along with swimmer Macey Mayer.

Romano recently shared about how his life has been transformed at Hope College with Sports Information Director Alan Babbitt.

What are your major(s) and minors(s)? What do you plan to do after you graduate?

I am a biomedical-mechanical engineering major with a minor in mathematics. I plan to take a long Europe trip with my girlfriend after graduation before going into the workforce in the late summer next year.

How has your sport helped shape you as a person and a student-athlete?

Sports have played a huge role in my life, teaching me valuable life lessons that I will never forget. Football has allowed me to become a better friend, team player, leader, and example for others. Not only has it forced me to have good time management skills in helping me with school but it has also given me so many opportunities to serve and help people in a variety of ways.

You also are one of Hope College’s two representatives for the MIAA’s Student-Athlete Advisory Council (SAAC) this school year. What are you aiming to bring to that role as well as learn from it? 

Dan Romano poses for a portrait.
Senior running back and engineering major Dan Romano.

The MIAA SAAC gets a voice in the rewriting of the division 3 NCAA constitution as well as give an opportunity for the MIAA schools to learn about different service activities, athletic involvement, and SAAC events that the other conference schools participate in. I am aiming to be a good voice and representative for Hope College Athletics. I am hoping to learn new and exciting ways of how athletes can be more involved throughout campus and take part in new service opportunities.

This year’s Hope Athletics theme is Strong and True. What does that mean to you as a student-athlete?

Being Strong and True reminds me of God telling Joshua to “be strong and steadfast”. Be humble, honest, and dedicated through any adversity that may come your way because God is on your side.

What extracurricular activity at Hope, outside of Hope Athletics, has been beneficial and memorable for you?

Although this is still technically within Hope Athletics, helping run the football Bible study has been super beneficial and memorable to me. I help run it with Zac Carlson and it’s a great opportunity for a group of guys to get together and talk about real topics in the world that matter and revolve around scripture. We have deep and meaningful conversations that help us become better Christian dudes throughout Hope and society as a whole.

Hope College Student-Athlete Spotlight: Macey Mayer

Macey Mayer swims the breaststroke.
Senior Macey Mayer swims during the 2022 MIAA Championships at Holland Aquatic Center.

Senior swimmer Macey Mayer relishes her opportunity to be a Hope College student-athlete and everything it brings her in the classroom, the pool and her extended community.

The butterflier from San Antonio, Texas loves to compete with the Flying Dutch, who are the two-time defending MIAA champions in swimming and diving. Hope opens the 2022-23 season on Friday-Saturday, Oct. 14-15, at the Ohio University Diving Invitational and on Saturday at a swimming dual meet at Grand Valley State University.

Women’s Schedule | Men’s Schedule

Mayer also is grateful for the chance to serve as a leader in Young Life at a local high school as well as one of Hope’s two representatives on the MIAA’s Student-Athlete Advisory Council.

Mayer recently shared about how her life has been transformed at Hope College with Sports Information Director Alan Babbitt.

What are your major(s) and minors(s)? What do you plan to do after you graduate?

Mayer: I am a psychology major and an exercise science minor. After I graduate, I plan on attending graduate school to pursue a degree in occupational therapy to ultimately become an OT.

How has your sport helped shape you as a person and a student-athlete?

Macey Mayer poses for a portrait.
Senior Macey Mayer

Mayer: Being a part of the swim team at Hope the past three years has truly had such an impact in shaping me into the person and athlete I am today. As a student-athlete at Hope, I have further developed important life skills such as time management, leadership, responsibility, and teamwork, preparing me well in many aspects for the next chapter of my life post-grad. Most importantly, my sport and experiences have furthered and encouraged my faith in Jesus. I am BEYOND thankful for my coaches and teammates of the Hope Swim & Dive team, as well as the friendships I have developed with other Hope student-athletes.

This year’s Hope Athletics theme is Strong and True. What does that mean to you as a student-athlete?

Mayer: As a student athlete, Hope Athletics theme of “Strong and True” means to me staying strong and true to my faith, school, sport, and teammates. This theme is an encouragement and testament to the leadership and community of Hope Athletics.

What extracurricular activity at Hope, outside of Hope Athletics, has been beneficial and memorable for you?

Mayer: Attending Hope College Young Life my freshman year was an extracurricular activity outside of Hope Athletics that got me involved with Greater Holland Young Life. (That) ultimately guided me to become a Young Life leader for a local high school. As a Young Life leader, I serve as a mentor, role model, and friend to the students of this highschool’s Young Life group. Alongside the other leaders, I organize and lead various activities that include group games, leader lesson time, and small group discussion time at our weekly gatherings we call “club.” Through this experience, I’ve learned how to be more open in walking with those who’ve come from different backgrounds and are at different places within their walk of faith. This experience has challenged me to live my own life with integrity and humility.

You also are one of Hope College’s two representatives for the MIAA’s Student-Athlete Advisory Council (SAAC) this school year. What are you aiming to bring to that role as well as learn from it? 

Mayer: My role includes giving updates of what SAAC is doing on Hope’s campus, as well as bringing ideas & opportunities from the MIAA SAAC meetings to Hope’s SAAC group. I hope to bring more awareness about what MIAA SAAC actually is and does and increase awareness on Hope’s campus of the importance of this group. I hope to learn more ways to implement and encourage community service, and diversity and inclusion opportunities on Hope’s campus through our institution’s SAAC group.

Elly Douglass ’04 Jordan: Hope Athletics Podcast

Elly Douglass ‘04 Jordan was not born yet when Title IX came into law on June 23, 1972, but is grateful every day the legislation did.

A fulfilling journey from childhood to adulthood would not have been possible without the federal civil rights law which prohibits sex-based discrimination by any educational institution that receives federal funding. Title IX also gave girls and women the equal opportunity to compete in sports across the country.

At Hope College, Jordan ran on the cross country and track and field teams before graduating with a degree in social sciences. 

Elly Jordan poses for a picture.
Elly Douglass ’04 Jordan

Now, Jordan is a supervising attorney at the Michigan Immigrant Rights Center and leads a team in providing trauma-informed legal services to refugee and immigrant kids who have experienced persecution and human trafficking.

Jordan talked about Title IX, which is celebrating its 50th anniversary, as a guest on the Hope Athletics Orange and Blue Podcast.

“Title IX is such a simple piece of legislation really that embodies the principle that we shall not have discrimination on the basis of sex in education,” Jordan said. “Since I’m 40, it predates me. So many of the women that we stand on the backs of were the people that really pioneered for us. I was rarely the first woman to do a lot of things. I know there have been a lot of women that have gone before me.”

Read More from Hope College’s Title IX at 50 Series

Opportunities Created

Upon graduation from Hope College with a degree in social sciences, Jordan moved to El Salvador with her husband to work as a missionary with the SHARE Foundation. Upon realizing she was in a position of privilege and could use that to do more to serve, she attended law school, where she excelled. 

After graduating from law school, Jordan worked as a law clerk for the US Court of Appeals, then joined Warner Norcross and Judd, LLP. Jordan left Warner to work as the Supervising Attorney at the Michigan State University College of Law Immigration Clinic.

Jordan then served as the Lead Attorney for the Survivor Law Project at the Michigan Coalition to End Domestic and Sexual Violence before working at the Michigan Immigrant Rights Center.

In April, Jordan was presented with the “Hope for Humanity” Award which is presented to Hope College alumni athletes who have demonstrated Christian commitment and service to others in their careers after Hope. 

“(Title IX) has impacted me quite a bit. I think it would be easy for me to take for granted a lot of the promise that Title IX has fulfilled thus far. Far be it for me to become lazy, to rest on my laurels and not continue to encourage that Title IX continues to fulfill its full promise.”

Orange and Blue Podcast Transcript

Title IX at 50: Nancy Kamstra, Swimming

Nancy Kamstra poses for a portrait
Nancy Kamstra, Hope College professor

Editor’s Note: On June 23, 1972, a federal civil rights law was passed that prohibited sex-based discrimination by any educational institution that receives federal funding. Title IX also gave girls and women the equal opportunity to compete in sports across the country. To commemorate the anniversary, Hope College Athletics shares memories and perspectives from Hope College student-athletes, coaches, and alumnae.

In our 11th and final installment, we hear from Nancy Kamstra ’82, a faculty member of the Hope College Department of Kinesiology who as a student was a member of the college’s inaugural swimming and diving teams. Kamstra also ran on the Hope’s cross country team. After graduating from Hope, Kamstra taught in Zeeland Public Schools for 28 years before returning to Hope in 2010 to develop a health minor that involved creating new courses to meet state standards to certify students to teach health in grades 6–12. Kamstra holds a master’s degree in Education from Grand Valley State University and a bachelor’s degree in physical education and special education from Hope.

Check out our Title IX profile series

What are some of your favorite memories from being a student-athlete at Hope and being a founding member of the swimming and diving program?

The fall of my freshman year I came to Hope and the Dow Center was a brand new building with a brand new natatorium!  We also had this young swim coach from California. He was supposed to be really good and he was and still is today! I was kind of nervous, but super excited. We didn’t have many girls on our team, but we were so honored to be the first swim team at Hope! Since Coach (John) Patnott coached both teams, we had workouts with the guys team too. I do remember them being so hard! The relationships, the hard work, the memories and life lessons are all powerful takeaways from my time as a student-athlete at Hope.

How did you discover you wanted to have a career in education, particularly health education?

I have wanted to be a teacher since I was in middle school. I knew this was God’s plan for my life. I loved the idea of physical education and health because this is an area that is so important! Being active and healthy is so important for all ages. I knew that I could help my students make better choices and that was powerful. Coming to Hope to teach students how to teach health and physical education has been such an amazing opportunity and journey. As a former longtime public school educator, to have the opportunity to teach the next generation of teachers and leaders is simply an honor.

What does Title IX mean to you today?

Title IX has provided so many opportunities for female student athletes!  It is so inspirational to see the growth of women’s sports at Hope College and the accomplishments of our female student-athletes.  When I look back at where our first women’s swimming and diving team started in the fall of 1978 until now, it is so exciting. Women in athletics deserve the same opportunities!

What is your hope for female student-athletes for the next 50 years?

My hope for female student-athletes at Hope in the next 50 years is that they will have the memories and experiences that I had as they move into life after competitive sport. I treasure the friends and relationships I made in the swimming pool and running cross country. The life lessons that athletics taught me have made me a better wife, mother, friend, teacher and person.  My coach taught me how to work hard and that anything is possible. For Hope student-athletes for the next 50 years, I hope that they continue to have the transformational experiences and success that Hope College Athletics is known for throughout the country. 

Arinn King and Jack Radzville: Hope Athletics Podcast

Arinn King and Jack Radzville displayed similar excellence on the field and in the classroom during their Hope College careers.

The 2022 Be Strong. Be True. Female and Male Athletes of the Year sat down together for an interview for the Hope Athletics Orange and Blue Podcast. They talked about their athletics and academic experiences and offered advice for incoming freshmen student-athletes.

Arinn King and Jack Radzville pose for portraits.
From left, Arinn King and Jack Radzville

King, a standout second baseman in softball, and Radzville, a decorated attacker in men’s lacrosse, graduated last month and concluded their playing careers.

King, an exercise science major, is headed to physical therapy school. Radzville, an electrical engineering major, has accepted a job with Ford Motor Company.

In April, King and Radzville received their Be Strong. Be True. honors during the annual HOPEYs awards ceremony.

The Be Strong. Be True. Athlete of the Year distinction is presented to a junior or senior who demonstrates the true essence of being a student-athlete and embodies the NCAA Division III motto of Discover, Develop, Dedicate.  This student-athlete is in high academic standing (minimum GPA of 3.5), plays a significant role on the team, and is involved in the Hope and Holland community.

Saying Thank You

Both student-athletes expressed gratitude for their four years on campus and all the people who supported them along their journeys.

King earned all-region honors from the National Fastpitch Coaches Association this spring. Hope posted a a 26-12 overall record.

“I would definitely say thank you to all of my coaches and my teammates. They pushed me on the field in the classroom, in my faith just and life in general with their friendships,” King said. “They pushed me to be my best in all aspects, taught me to be more confident in who I was. I’m definitely a better version of myself since walking into Hope because of them.”

Radzville received honorable-mention All-America honors from the United States Intercollegiate Lacrosse Association. The attacker was voted as the Michigan Intercollegiate Athletic Association’s Most Valuable Offensive Player this season. Hope finished with 15-2 overall record and earned the MIAA’s regular-season title.

“I want to say thank you to all my friends, teammates, coaches and my family because they have had my back and encouraged me to do the best I can,” Radzville said. “They’re always proud of what I’ve done, but they always pushed me to do better. I want to shout out Andrew Conlon, Cole Scheffler and my coaches, Mike Schanhals, Chris Scheldt, for always pushing me to do better academically and athletically.”

Written transcript of the Orange and Blue Podcast interview