Refer A Student

Referrals from alumni and families make a difference. Once a prospective student is referred, one in five of them apply. Over the past four years, nearly 300 students are at Hope because they first connected through a referral from someone like you.

WHY HOPE?

With more than 3,500 colleges and universities in the United States alone, what makes Hope such a unique option? Well, let’s start with three words: mind, body and spirit. These are the anchors of the Hope experience. Before you reach out to the prospective Hope students in your life, brush up on why there’s never been a better time to consider Hope College.

WHO SHOULD I REFER?

Students from around the world that are currently sophomores and juniors in high school and have demonstrated leadership, service and academic performance are great candidates for a referral. We seek students who will bring a wide range of perspectives and gifts to enrich our campus community. Though admission is selective, we’ll give each completed application careful consideration and review for factors that signal future academic and social success.

WHAT SHOULD I SAY?

Feel free to share your own Hope experiences in addition to these ideas:

For those that express interest, don’t forget to suggest they apply.

HOW DO I MAKE A REFERRAL

Making a referral is easy. You simply fill out this refer a student form. There are a few required fields including:

  • Name
  • Address
  • Current school

Other items like contact information, date of birth, GPA and academic interests are not required, but are helpful if you have them.

The Hope College admissions team will follow up with individual attention to the student you recommended.

WHAT HAPPENS NEXT?

You’ll receive an email from Hope confirming your referral, and we will follow up with the student encouraging them to apply to Hope.

As a thank you for referring a student you will receive a coupon code for $10 off a purchase of $40 or more to the Hope College Bookstore.

Refer a student today!

The Alumni Postcard Project

Here in the Office of Alumni & Family Engagement, we spend a few minutes every Tuesday morning watching a TED Talk or two. We’ve learned how to overcome fears from a man who climbed a 3,000 foot cliff with no ropes, how to find joy in everyday life, and how hilarious replying to a spam email can be. These short videos have given us a lot to talk about and have also inspired us to get creative in our work. A talk about sending letters to strangers led to a discussion on other ways mail can be used to connect and inspire. Lots of crazy ideas and a few bunny trails later, someone suggested asking our 33,000+ alumni to send postcards to our students to show them where a Hope education can take them.

 

Our new Boerigter Center for Calling and Career asks students “Where will you go?” So we want to know . . . “Where did you go?”

Are you an accountant in Austin? A biologist in Boise? A choreographer in Cleveland? Regardless of where your Hope education has taken you, we want to share your journey with the Hope students who will follow you into the world. The Office of Alumni and Family Engagement and Boerigter Center for Calling and Career are teaming up to launch The Postcard Project. The mission of the project is to inspire current Hope students by showing real-life examples of the paths they could take upon graduation (or even before!)

We are asking our network of more than 33,000 alumni to grab a postcard from where they live or work (hotel gift shops, gas stations or convenience stores like Walgreen’s often carry inexpensive postcards). Then simply write your name, graduation year, major and answer to the question “Where did your Hope education take you?” on the back of the card. You can be straight forward by answering the question with your job title and company, or get creative with a short tale.

Mail your postcard to:

Hope College
Boerigter Center
141 East 12th Street
Holland, MI 49423

We will display the postcards in an installation in the Boerigter Center lobby space in DeWitt Center, allowing students to peruse the cards as they are added in a space that has been designed for them to contemplate their future plans.

You need not have won a big award, made a big discovery or rake in the big bucks to be a big help with this project. We are looking for submissions from every corner of the world and every type of profession. We want students to have a realistic representation of the options that await them – maybe they’ll even be inspired to explore professions they’ve never heard of before.

Want to get even more involved in helping students discern their calling? Sign up to be a DiscoverWork host! This program, operated by the Boerigter Center, provides students with short-term opportunities to meet with or shadow professionals in their field of interest.

Check hope.edu/alumni/events for upcoming events both regionally and near campus.

The Invitation of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

During the school year of 1962-63, Roland Marshall ’63 and Pete Paulsen ’64, with the permission of the administration and the support of student government, invited Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. to campus. Pete contacted the Office of Alumni Engagement recently to share his story:

Hope College campus, 1965

Pete Paulsen ’64 recalls that the early 1960s were years of discussion, action, turmoil, and change. Although Hope College clearly never was a Berkeley, Paulsen admits, all over campus Hope students engaged in passionate discussions about what could and should happen to address the United States’ problem with racism, its movement toward war in Vietnam, and tensions with the Soviet Union.

He confesses that his memory might not be as good today as it was when he was a student. However, it appears that his friends are able to recall even less about the courageous step they took when inviting Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. to the campus of Hope College. “Much of this history must of necessity then be conjecture,” Paulsen therefore concludes. One of his friends involved was Roland Marshall ’63, a former classmate of James Sanford. Together, the two students attended Dr. King’s speech at Ohio University during the International Student Conference of Race. Paulsen recalls his friends’ excitement about the dynamic and direct nature of Dr. King’s presentation upon their return to Hope, and the powerful impact this had on him.

Paulsen believes that this enthusiasm matched the energy Dr. King generated through his effort to address the issues with American racism. Although Paulsen is unsure about specific details, he recalls having planned an invitation of Dr. King to the campus of Hope College together with several friends. Many students placed an importance on hearing what Dr. King, a pivotal figure in the civil rights movement, had to say, and demonstrating their support of his work.

Baccalaureate 1965

Paulsen is confident that an invitation of Dr. King could not have been realized had it not been for student support and the permission of the college’s administration. Unfortunately, Dr. King was unable to visit the campus. Paulsen does not possess a copy of the initial invitation letter and of Dr. King’s response to this. He vaguely remembers having sent Dr. King another letter asking him to choose a date, and in the summer of 1963, Paulsen received a second letter from Dr. King. This indicated that the first letter had offered a specific date on which Dr. King was unavailable. Paulsen recently gave this letter to Hope’s archives. The letter reveals that due to commitments to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, Dr. King was unable to visit Hope College.

MLK Jr. Letter to Hope College student Peter Paulsen, August 1963

According to Paulsen, Hope College has been committed to traditions and historic practice while simultaneously pushing for knowledge and morally right behavior and values. “It was courageous of the college to extend this invitation and invite a challenging voice to speak on campus and to community,” he says. “We need to continue that balance.”

“It was courageous of the college to extend this invitation and invite a challenging voice to speak on campus and to community.”

Thank you, Paul, for sharing your story and this letter. As we look forward to Martin Luther King, Jr. Day on Monday, January 19, you are welcome to attend a lecture by Dr. Joy DeGruy on campus at 2:00 pm. For more information, please visit hope.edu/calendar.

Hope Alumni Bring Unique Perspectives to the Tech Industry

One of the best parts of my job is meeting some of Hope’s 33,000 alumni on their home turf. With graduates living in all 50 states and over 80 countries around the world, the opportunities for connections are endless. Whether it’s entrepreneurs from Nairobi, newly found connections in Tokyo or young alumni making their mark in Chicago, it is inspiring to meet alumni as they pursue lives of leadership and service in a global society.

This exciting professional privilege reached new heights during a trip last fall to California and Washington State. In part because of a new partnership between the office of Alumni Engagement and the new Boerigter Center for Calling and Career, my goal was to establish connections with alumni in technology to share with current students on campus.

We have over 1,750 alumni living in states with Pacific shores. As you might expect, a fair number, over 600 in fact, live in the San Francisco and Seattle areas. Many of them, also as you might expect, work in the tech industry. This was the focus of my trip.

I had a great visit with Eva at Joanie’s Cafe. Her story of creating community within her field is inspiring.
I had a great visit with Eva at Joanie’s Cafe. Her story of creating community within her field is inspiring.

After Lyft rides during the first 24 hours in the Bay Area in two Lexuses, a Mercedes and a BMW, I knew I was not in Holland, Michigan anymore. My first appointment was in downtown Palo Alto with Eva Gaumond ’90. She has had an accomplished career as a user experience (UX) leader, often fostering collaboration and utilizing empathy she learned as a psychology major at Hope to get to the heart of user needs. After moving to the area and wishing there were more professional development opportunities in her field, she simply created them herself, co-founding a now 2,400 member non-profit professional UX organization from the ground up. It was an impressive start to my day.

Facebook’s new headquarters, MPK20.
Part of Facebook’s new headquarters, MPK21.

After breakfast, I made the short six mile trip out to Facebook’s new headquarters, MPK20. Designed by world-famous architect Frank Gehry, the 430,000-square-foot space, spread over 22 acres, is LEED-certified and boasts a 9-acre green roof (complete with work cabanas) and underground parking lot. While entering this compound of an office building was a unique experience, what made it even more meaningful was connecting with a friend now working inside.

I first met David Moore ’10 when he was an intern in the alumni office. From there he joined the Canadian digital marketing and e-commerce team at Gordon Food Service in Grand Rapids before moving to Philadelphia to work at a start-up using machine learning to personalize websites and apps. Now David counts himself fortunate to live in San Francisco where he works in product management on video products at Facebook. We were joined for lunch by another Hope alumnus, Josh Metzler ’99, who has been a software engineer at Facebook for the last seven years. A chemistry and religion major while at Hope, Josh is a self-taught coder who has now been working for the world’s largest social media company for longer than most of its 25,000 employees.

Facebook employees and Hope College alumni, David Moore ’10 and Josh Metzler ’99, take a break to talk about their Hope College experiences.
Facebook employees and Hope College alumni, David Moore ’10 and Josh Metzler ’99, take a break to talk about their Hope College experiences.

The Indian cuisine at Facebook is legit. Over naan and tandoori chicken we discussed how a liberal arts background has shaped how they solve problems at work. They shared that Hope gave them the freedom and supportive community to be curious. Then David told me this story: A friend of his visited during a semester off at Harvard and attended a class at Hope with him. Afterwards the friend remarked, “that was a better class than I’ve experienced yet in Cambridge – intimate, thoughtful, engaging.” At the time, David wasn’t sure he believed him. Now, after applying his Hope experience in Menlo Park, he thinks he does.

“Hope gave them the freedom and supportive community to be curious.”

Influenced by courses like creative writing and religion, these Facebook staffers talked about technology as being about understanding the deeper needs people have – some they can share, some that they can’t. Their work is focused on bringing the world closer together and understanding people’s perspectives. This way of thinking not only makes for a better interface on an app, but also helps to figure out how machine learning can help identify bad actors.

Golden Gate Bridge
After an evening enjoying some of the sights in San Francisco, I spent the next day connecting with alumni at Google and Tesla. At the Googleplex in Mountain View, a gathering of Hope alumni Googlers met over breakfast. In a testament to the longevity and relevancy of a liberal arts background, we had graduates from each of the last five consecutive decades represented.

Crossing the commencement stage back in Holland with dates ranging from 1979 to 2018, these product directors, software engineers and recruiting coordinators compared notes on what can help a graduate of this decade stand out. The consensus was that students should articulate the soft skills they have developed through a liberal arts education — skills like teamwork, problem solving and communication — alongside demonstrated hard skills developed through experiences like coding competitions, proficiency in programming and scripting languages.

“Students should articulate the soft skills they have developed through a liberal arts education — skills like teamwork, problem solving and communication.”

Google employees outside the Googleplex headquarters.
Karl Rasche ’00 (Senior Software Engineer), Ron Heiby ’79 (Technical Program Manager), Chris Turkstra ’93 (Product Director for Google Assistant), Douglas Van Wieren ’88 (Software and Site Reliability Engineer), and Josias Sanon ’18 (Recruiting Coordinator).

Later in the day, at a new Tesla office building in North Bay, you could sense the fast pace of innovation. There I connected with Blair Williams ’10 and Randy Johnson ’07. They shared how the undergraduate research program and international exchange programs sparked their interest in language and culture and opened the door for graduate experiences at places like Stanford, which in turn opened doors in Silicon Valley. They also shared how a liberal arts background has helped them to be well-rounded and not just technical. Through experiences at Hope they were able to wrestle with philosophical, societal, and spiritual questions, improve writing and communication skills, and becoming well prepared for working on cross-functional teams. The icing on the cake was the personal relationships with research advisors and senior seminar professors that turned into personal friendships which have shaped their lives in immeasurable ways.

“A liberal arts background has helped them to be well-rounded and not just technical.”

Blair Williams '10 and Randy Johnson '07 at Tesla.
Blair Williams ’10 and Randy Johnson ’07 at Tesla.

After two hours in flight over the peaks of Mt. St Helens, Mt. Adams and Mt. Rainier, I landed in Seattle. Among other alumni and employer connections, I met Thao Le ’11. Today she is a senior financial analyst at Amazon. Just a few years ago she was an international student at Hope College from Vietnam. While at Hope she majored in accounting and had internships at The Stow Company and Perrigo. Her first job after Hope was with Deloitte in Seattle working on an audit team. Traveling frequently while working with international teams at Amazon, she now uses leadership development and cross-cultural skills honed at Hope as a member of Mortar Board, Phelps Scholars and Hope Asian Perspective Association. We toured a new Amazon Go store and The Spheres, Amazon’s innovative downtown hub that brings a direct link to nature to Amazon employees. With her office right down the street, Thao shared that she enjoys working and visiting this unique home to more than 40,000 plants from the cloud forest regions of over 30 countries.

Thao Le ’11 shows off The Spheres at Amazon in downtown Seattle.

Once I was back on campus the next week, it was time to share lessons learned from these alumni with colleagues and students. Their stories can serve both as inspiration for future generations of Hope College students and for other alumni to get involved.

If you are interested in sharing your own career expertise, hosting a student or hiring a Hope graduate, complete the form at hope.edu/impact and a member of our team will be in touch with next steps.

10 Under 10 Award Recipient: Xander Krieg ’12

“He developed an algorithm that allows a greater understanding of facial expressions and emotions.”

Ten Under Ten Award Recipient Xander Krieg ’12

Xander Krieg graduated cum laude with a bachelor of arts degree in Japanese studies and psychology. After his time at Hope, he continued his education at the University of Hawaii where he received a master of arts degree in clinical psychology. Krieg is currently pursuing a doctor of philosophy degree in clinical psychology at the same university.

Since graduating from Hope College, Krieg has had a multi-career track in academics, business, and clinical psychology. Krieg’s scholarship and professional work have led him to spend the past few years of his life traveling between Japan and the United States, the two countries that he calls home. During his initial graduate studies, he worked as a graduate assistant and clinical practicum student at the University of Hawaii’s Center for Cognitive Behavior Therapy.

Krieg was then selected as the Fulbright-Hays Pre-Doctoral Scholar to Japan from 2015 to 2016. He completed his dissertation work at the University of Tokyo and began working for Hitotsubashi University’s Graduate School of International Corporate Strategy as a statistics and research design consultant, where he still consults today. Krieg has also spent time as a therapist and clinical staff member at the TELL Counseling Center in Tokyo, Japan. During the continuation of his education, Krieg was a doctoral intern and clinical staff member at the Student Medical and Counseling Center at Central Washington University. Throughout Krieg’s career as a businessman and academic, he has published peer-reviewed material in academic journals and books, as well as providing workshops, training, and other professional presentations both in the United States and overseas.

Krieg considers himself both a scientist and entrepreneur. In pursuit of his endeavor “to spread the science of psychology and human behavior analysis in the various local and international contexts,” Krieg co-founded Emosta, Inc., a consulting company that provides emotion AI technology to counselors, coaches, and HR consultants. As the chief research and design officer, Krieg is responsible for the design and development of the AI software.

Xavier Krieg receives the Ten Under Ten Award presented by Professor of Sociology Roger Nemeth.

The “10 Under 10 Awards” honor emerging leaders who are making significant contributions by living out their callings; engaged in the local and global community through professional and/or volunteer involvement; and use their education to think about important issues with wisdom and clarity, communicate effectively to bridge boundaries that divide human communities and act as agents of hope living faithfully into their vocations. Designed for alumni who are within 10 years of graduation, they are presented by the Hope College Alumni Association. Make a nomination today!

10 Under 10 Award Recipient: Travis Rieth ’10

“He travels North America as a photographer, writer, consultant, adventurer and advocate.”

Ten Under Ten Award Recipient Travis Rieth ’10

Travis Rieth, also known as Travis Wild, has lived a life of adventure, leadership, and service within numerous communities and through various roles. He says, “I am guessing why I was nominated for this award is not due [to] what has made up my professional career, but the life I’ve lived outside that as a writer, photographer, and someone who goes on adventures.” Rieth graduated cum laude with a bachelor of arts degree in psychology from Hope College.

Following his graduation from Hope College, Rieth worked as a primary counselor at the Dale House Project in Colorado Springs, where he worked with adolescent men and women who had been abused, homeless, in gangs, in juvenile detention, or in the foster care system in some capacity. After this position, Rieth lived homeless voluntarily in Denver in order to better understand how to empathize with a population few understand and for which he would focus on unconditional love. Rieth said he wanted to be “a Christian in a place it is desperately needed and living out love rather than just telling about it.”

This experience led Rieth to focus his efforts on speaking, writing, and leadership in the field of empathy. He has written two books: one about the adventure and lessons he gained leaving a life of comfort to live homeless for a short period of time, and the other is a children’s book for kids who have been abused or trafficked.

In 2011, he returned to Holland where he created a position at the Holland Rescue Mission focused on outreach and helping to build community programs to prevent recidivism. He led a few Hope College Greek Life retreats and coached varsity lacrosse at Holland Christian High School. Rieth then moved back out West where he worked as a Young Life mountain lodge caretaker just outside Lake Tahoe, California, where he coordinated the onsite activities and adventures for groups. From 2015 to 2017, Rieth worked as a travel director for PepsiCo, Marriott, Hewlett Packard, Mercedes, and New York Life.

Rieth founded Wild-Writes, a start-up company that provides photography, videography, design,  writing, digital and consulting services to brands in order to help better tell their stories. Outside of his work with his company, he is focusing on the publication of the books he has written and with aspirations to build on his work as a journalist and photographer. Find him on Instagram.

Travis Rieth receives his 10 Under 10 Award from Assistant Professor of Kinesiology and Volleyball Coach Becky Schmidt.

The “10 Under 10 Awards” honor emerging leaders who are making significant contributions by living out their callings; engaged in the local and global community through professional and/or volunteer involvement; and use their education to think about important issues with wisdom and clarity, communicate effectively to bridge boundaries that divide human communities and act as agents of hope living faithfully into their vocations. Designed for alumni who are within 10 years of graduation, they are presented by the Hope College Alumni Association. Make a nomination today!

10 Under 10 Award Recipient: Sarah Watkins ’08 Fabian

“She creates new worlds on the stage and instructs others on how to do the same.”

Ten Under Ten Award Recipient Sarah Watkins ’08 Fabian

Sarah Fabian graduated magna cum laude with a bachelor of arts degree in theatre and studio art minor. Throughout her undergraduate studies, Fabian spent the majority of her time within the theatre department learning, researching, and practicing the art of design. Over her four years, she contributed to the set designs of many productions, including Perfect Pie, The School for Scandal and Rose and The Rime. Fabian was honored as a senior for her work by receiving the Brad Williams Memorial Award for Creativity and Excellence in Design from the Hope College Theatre Department, and the Regional Design Project Award for her scenic design of A Flea in Her Ear and a Certificate of Merit for scenic design on Rose and the Rime at the John F. Kennedy National American College Theatre Festival.

After her time at Hope College, Fabian earned a master of fine arts in scenic design at Northwestern University, then she pursued a career as a teaching artist and theatrical scenic designer, serving as an assistant professor of theatre at Northeastern Illinois University since the fall of 2016.

“I feel incredibly blessed that every day I wake up and am excited for what’s ahead because I am doing what I love, am good at, can be paid for it, and most importantly, it’s what the world needs…Hope College did for me what I get the honor and privilege to do every day at NEIU, and I am so grateful for this gift.”

Outside of her professorship, Fabian has led workshops and presentations regarding scenic design and visual storytelling at the Goodman Theatre and Steppenwolf Theatre Co., to name just a few. She has also been honored for her work in the United States of America Emerge Exhibition at the Prague Quadrennial of Performance and Design Space and in multiple See.Me Photography exhibitions in New York City.

Sarah Fabian receives her award from Professor of Theatre Richard Smith.

The “10 Under 10 Awards” honor emerging leaders who are making significant contributions by living out their callings; engaged in the local and global community through professional and/or volunteer involvement; and use their education to think about important issues with wisdom and clarity, communicate effectively to bridge boundaries that divide human communities and act as agents of hope living faithfully into their vocations. Designed for alumni who are within 10 years of graduation, they are presented by the Hope College Alumni Association. Make a nomination today!

10 Under 10 Award Recipient: Jonas Lawson ’13

“He oversees high-profile campaign advertising at the local, state and federal levels.”

Ten Under Ten Award Recipient Jonas Lawson

Jonas Lawson began his education at Hope College with the intent on becoming a news reporter. Early on in his time at Hope, Lawson wrote his first TV commercial for a class project and fell in love with media. After four years, he graduated with a bachelor of arts degree in communication with a concentration on broadcasting.

As a senior, Lawson attended the National Association of Broadcasters Convention in Las Vegas with a class. There he was approached by Jeffery Myers, the founder of the Media Sales Institute at the Florida A&M University. Myers invited Lawson to attend the program after graduating from Hope, and in June 2013, Lawson graduated from the Media Sales Institute, a two-week intensive program for young graduates interested in pursuing a career in advertising sales.

The experience and opportunity at Florida A&M jump-started his career and landed him an offer for a position as a junior account executive from Comcast Spotlight in Houston, Texas. He began his career by building his book of clients and gaining exposure in the advertising field. In 2016, Lawson was awarded the President’s Club Award by Comcast Spotlight for his achievement as being one of the top six percent of Advertising Account Executives within the company who exceeded his yearly sales projections.

In September of 2017, Lawson took the next step in his career as a political advertising account executive with NCC Media, a television and online advertising firm in Bethesda, Maryland. He is responsible for overseeing high-profile campaigns, including candidate and issue advertisers at the local, state and federal levels.

Outside of his professional life, Lawson has maintained an active role in his community by volunteering with Comcast Spotlight on Comcast Cares Day. In 2013, he began volunteering with Star of Hope, an organization dedicated to providing resources to individuals who are homeless and mothers with young children who need shelter and assistance. He continues to support those around him by mentoring, coaching youth track, and extending support to those in need following natural disasters, such as Hurricane Harvey in Houston, Texas. Find him on LinkedIn.

The “10 Under 10 Awards” honor emerging leaders who are making significant contributions by living out their callings; engaged in the local and global community through professional and/or volunteer involvement; and use their education to think about important issues with wisdom and clarity, communicate effectively to bridge boundaries that divide human communities and act as agents of hope living faithfully into their vocations. Designed for alumni who are within 10 years of graduation, they are presented by the Hope College Alumni Association. Make a nomination today!

10 Under 10 Award Recipient: Maggie Mohr ’09

“She has made significant contributions in neuroscience through her research.”

Ten Under Ten Award Recipient Maggie Mohr ’09

Maggie Mohr, a young woman with a passion for science, graduated with a bachelor of arts degree in biology and psychology from Hope College. Towards the end of her undergraduate career and after making a considerable impact within the natural and applied sciences division, numerous professors encouraged Mohr to pursue graduate school.

In August of 2015, she earned a Ph.D. in neuroscience from the Michigan State University College of Natural Science Neuroscience Program focused on neuro- and gliogenesis in the pubertal rat brain and the implications for female reproduction. Mohr credits the unique and valuable research opportunities throughout her undergraduate experience at Hope College that gave her a solid foundation regarding science, learning, and service and prepared her for a career in academia and research.

As a graduate student, Mohr engaged in research, alongside Dr. Cheryl Sisk at Michigan State University, investigating cell proliferation during puberty and its consequent effects on adult behavior. After obtaining her Ph.D., Mohr received the Chancellor’s Postdoctoral Fellow within the Department of Neurobiology at the University of California, Los Angeles. There she continues her career as a scientist and researcher working on a project titled “Estrogen Responsiveness of Pubertally Born Astrocytes” within the laboratory of Dr. Paul Micevych.

Throughout her undergraduate and graduate career, Mohr received numerous awards for her contributions and research including the Travel Award (2009) and the Undergraduate Student Poster Award (2009) from the Society of Behavioral Neuroendocrinology and the Research Excellence Award (2013) from the Michigan State University Neuroscience Program. Mohr also received the Iris Cantor and CTSI Young Investigator Award (2017-2018) from the University of California, Los Angeles. In 2018, she was awarded the New Investigator Award from the Society for Behavioral Neuroendocrinology for her continued contribution to the field.

Mohr has pursued a passion for science outreach after graduating from Hope College. She has participated in various programs including the Michigan State University’s Neuroscience Outreach Team, 4H Exploration Days, Neuroscience Fair, and Brain Awareness Week. Mohr continues to contribute to the science community through her involvement in the Los Angeles Brain Bee, a program designed especially to excite high school students to learn about neuroscience.

Maggie Mohr receives her 10 Under 10 Award from Professor of Biology Greg Fraley.

The “10 Under 10 Awards” honor emerging leaders who are making significant contributions by living out their callings; engaged in the local and global community through professional and/or volunteer involvement; and use their education to think about important issues with wisdom and clarity, communicate effectively to bridge boundaries that divide human communities and act as agents of hope living faithfully into their vocations. Designed for alumni who are within 10 years of graduation, they are presented by the Hope College Alumni Association. Make a nomination today!

10 Under 10 Award Recipient: Carl Scholten ’11

“He leads school staff and encourages academic and spiritual growth in students.”

Ten Under Ten Award Recipient Carl Scholten ’11

Carl Scholten graduated magna cum laude with a bachelor of arts degree in education with a concentration in social studies from Hope College.

“Hope College made me a lifelong learner and taught me that an education is never complete. It inspired me to go back to complete my masters and will eventually drive me to complete even further education at the doctoral level.”

Scholten continued his education at Central Michigan University where he received his master of arts degree in school principalship site-based leadership.

Scholten began his teaching career as a seventh-grade teacher with the Grand Traverse Area Catholic Schools, teaching history and literature. He transitioned to teaching at the high school level at Traverse City Central High School where he taught United States history, crime and justice, and college test prep. After the completion of his master’s degree, Scholten accepted the position of school principal at St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Middle School, part of the Grand Traverse Area Catholic School system. As principal, he serves as the educational leader and chief administrator of the middle school, responsible for implementing and managing the policies, regulations, and procedures of the district. He has implemented a faith formation program for entire district staff, along with completing research on adolescent faith formation to guide curriculum and instruction of the district.

Since 2011, Scholten has served as head coach for a variety of sports teams within the Grand Traverse Area Catholic Schools system. He mentors athletes with a holistic mindset, focusing on the formation of the whole person within athletics. Scholten was a member of the coaching staff that won a Division IV MHSAA track and field state championship and has coached four conference championships and three state qualifying teams.

Outside of his professional career in education, Scholten plays an active role in his community. He volunteers as a CrossFit coach at a local gym, teaching multiple classes throughout the week. Scholten has served as a team member with Christ Renews His Parish and is a parishioner, Eucharistic Minister, and youth group leader at Immaculate Conception Catholic Church. He has also served as a high school group leader with Freedom Builders, a week-long summer mission trip program that focuses on improving local low-income housing while building relationships with God.

Carl Scholten and Chaz Shelton receive their Ten Under Ten Award presented by Associate presented by Jesus Montano on behalf of Professor of Education Baars Bultman.

The “10 Under 10 Awards” honor emerging leaders who are making significant contributions by living out their callings; engaged in the local and global community through professional and/or volunteer involvement; and use their education to think about important issues with wisdom and clarity, communicate effectively to bridge boundaries that divide human communities and act as agents of hope living faithfully into their vocations. Designed for alumni who are within 10 years of graduation, they are presented by the Hope College Alumni Association. Make a nomination today!